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How long should diamond stones last?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I just started using some new diamond stones, and noticed a big difference compared to the ones I've been using for a year or two.  They were even causing little "dust bunnies" of metal, in addition to the black line on the stone. I can't remember ever getting that stones. I'm estimating I used my old ones over 50 times. Is that more than enough? There a little expensive for buying one set every season.

 

Before someone asks, yes I am lubricating them.

post #2 of 18
Different brands? Different grits?

I've been using three of mine for ten years. Others are newer.
post #3 of 18
Depends on how often you use them and the grit. I get a couple of seasons at least with my 200 grit WC/Pro stones, but I use this grit quite a bit. My med to fine grits I'm still going strong after 4 seasons of heavy (racer tunes) use on many, many skis.
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Different brands? Different grits?

I've been using three of mine for ten years. Others are newer.

Wow, long time. I have moonflex stones.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by hbear View Post

Depends on how often you use them and the grit. I get a couple of seasons at least with my 200 grit WC/Pro stones, but I use this grit quite a bit. My med to fine grits I'm still going strong after 4 seasons of heavy (racer tunes) use on many, many skis.

 

 I have 100, 200, and 400. I did notice that the used 100 grit and the new 200 grit feel very similar to the touch. I haven't been using the 100 grit for as long as the other two.

 

Am I doing something wrong? I've only used them for no more than two seasons, and you guys are getting much more out of them than that. I do rub it a fair amount when I make a pass. One pass last about 15-20 seconds (estimating).

post #5 of 18

Sounds like a lot of passes, I don't count (just go off feel) but sounds like a lot. (usually you can feel and hear when it's smooth to move on)

 

I'm guessing it has more to do with moving to the next stone before ready?  E.g. if you move to the 400 before the 200 has done it's work you'll wear out the 400 more quickly.

 

Similar, if you are filing your edges and don't use a smooth (2nd cut file) after the course cut....your 100/200 grit stones are going to take a beating.

 

The 100 (I don't use as I find it too aggressive) or 200 grit is going to get worn out the quickest by far.  This is normal considering how much you'll use it and what you ask them to do.  Finer grits are really just polishing an already smooth surface so won't see much wear there.

 

Maybe you are pressing too hard?  There should be very little pressure on the stone during passes, let the tool do the work.

 

Another factor is the quality of stone, the "economy" stones don't last nearly as long as the "pro or world cup" stones....cheaper sure but I find they last half as long.  

post #6 of 18
Are you sure it's not just loaded up with wax? Normally I don't have that issue with Moonflex, but I guess it's possible. Have you taken a toothbrush to it? Are you using this stone for a file? (Like to do bevel changes?)
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Are you sure it's not just loaded up with wax? Normally I don't have that issue with Moonflex, but I guess it's possible. Have you taken a toothbrush to it? Are you using this stone for a file? (Like to do bevel changes?)

WAX??? Where is wax coming from? 

 

 

You should diamond stone before you wax


Edited by Atomicman - 12/1/15 at 9:27am
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by nemesis256 View Post
 

I just started using some new diamond stones, and noticed a big difference compared to the ones I've been using for a year or two.  They were even causing little "dust bunnies" of metal, in addition to the black line on the stone. I can't remember ever getting that stones. I'm estimating I used my old ones over 50 times. Is that more than enough? There a little expensive for buying one set every season.

 

Before someone asks, yes I am lubricating them.

What diamond stones are you using? 

 

I rarely if ever use a 100 except for extreme damage. 

 

To answer your question more directly, you can feel with your finger the grittiness /condition of your stone. 

When I push my finger tip against the diamond if it feels slick and there is not much resistance , time for a new stone. 

 

You can also do the finger test back to back with a new stone and note the difference. 

 

Dust bunnies of metal are normal, particularly for the coarser stones.

post #9 of 18
He said he was using Moonflex.

No worries, A-man, I don't wax until after I do the edges. But some people get confused about the order and I know years ago I did.
post #10 of 18

or maybe the sidewall isn't trimmed back and his stone is grinding on the sidewall?

post #11 of 18
I could see that for DMT stones vs Moonflex, if the new ones are Moonflex, because my DMT stones go right to the edge, but the Moonflex are about an eighth of an inch in, consequently the DMT's have sidewall issues sooner. But if the old and new are the same, then I wouldn't think only the old ones would be having issues.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

He said he was using Moonflex.

No worries, A-man, I don't wax until after I do the edges. But some people get confused about the order and I know years ago I did.

I guess I never thought anyone would do a pristine wax job and then fark it all up with a bunch of passes with tools!  And I knew you knew this! 

 

 

But fact is stranger than fiction!:eek 

post #13 of 18
I've watched people in my tuning area who are new start to do this until I started yelling at them.

Being old, I have a checklist or my mind would wander when I get interrupted. I'm always coming down to the tuning room saying, "What was I doing....?" Fortunately, there's the old checklist telling me where I'm at on which set of skis.
Edited by sibhusky - 12/1/15 at 8:31pm
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

 

To answer your question more directly, you can feel with your finger the grittiness /condition of your stone. 

When I push my finger tip against the diamond if it feels slick and there is not much resistance , time for a new stone.

I did end up doing that, and the difference is pretty significant for the 200 grit.

 

It still confuses me how a few people here say they've used the same stones for years!

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by nemesis256 View Post
 

It still confuses me how a few people here say they've used the same stones for years!

 

If your edges are often damaged by rock hits, that puts wear on stones.     Not much you can do about it.

If you're pushing the stone into the edge with more than light pressure, that puts undue wear on stones.   Stop doing that (if you are).     Think polite handshake pressure and that's it.

If you're going tip/tail more than 10 times per edge per stone per tune, that puts undue wear on stones.   Stop doing that (if you are).   Move on to the next finer grit.

 

Do regularly wash off the face of the stone with an old toothbrush or something.

post #16 of 18

You can't use too much solution.  Dip the tool often.  As many have said don't press too hard.  I say don't press too hard until things smooth out.  As said above the 100's ans 200's are going to wear out faster as they see the most abuse from burrs and file striations.

 

I use a container full of solution and dip lots.  Then if any plastic, wax etc. gets into the stone I brush it well in the solution in the container.   Look here: https://youtu.be/aUZQ0isiPIQ?t=2m38s

 

Even with the best care, the do wear out.  At some point you need new ones.

 

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 

You can't use too much solution.  Dip the tool often.  As many have said don't press too hard.  I say don't press too hard until things smooth out.  As said above the 100's ans 200's are going to wear out faster as they see the most abuse from burrs and file striations.

 

I use a container full of solution and dip lots.  Then if any plastic, wax etc. gets into the stone I brush it well in the solution in the container.   Look here: https://youtu.be/aUZQ0isiPIQ?t=2m38s

 

Even with the best care, the do wear out.  At some point you need new ones.

 

I scrub mine with Softscrub and a small stiff brush, it is amazing how dirty they get and how easy they are to clean up.

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 

You can't use too much solution.  Dip the tool often.  As many have said don't press too hard.  I say don't press too hard until things smooth out.  As said above the 100's ans 200's are going to wear out faster as they see the most abuse from burrs and file striations.

 

I use a container full of solution and dip lots.  Then if any plastic, wax etc. gets into the stone I brush it well in the solution in the container.   Look here: https://youtu.be/aUZQ0isiPIQ?t=2m38s

 

Even with the best care, the do wear out.  At some point you need new ones.

 

I scrub mine with Softscrub and a small stiff brush, it is amazing how dirty they get and how easy they are to clean up.


Truth!  ^  Clean them up = small stiff brush!

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