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Skis Chattering?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Something that really annoys me at times is when the fronts of my skis "click" together.  I don't look down at my skis, but I can hear it.  They don't always do this.  My analysis is that if I had more weight on the front of my skis, it would be impossible for them to do that.  Am I right?  I keep trying to lean forward, keeping my shins in contact with the front of my boots, but we all know that what we try to do and what we actually do is sometimes different.

 

Any other ideas?

post #2 of 16
I assume you don't mean banging AGAINST each other? Just chatter, like some early rise skis will do on uneven hard pack? I have that problem with one pair of skis and to control it I have to mentally think about engaging the front of the ski on every turn. What am I actually DOING? Who knows? I just think "engage at the contact point" (they're not five point skis, so it's about five inches from the tip) with every turn off I'm on those skis. My normal skis for those conditions don't require that level of concentration, which is why I prefer them. Less exhausting mentally.

I don't think I lean differently, but it may be a timing thing. Sorry I can't help more.
post #3 of 16

I'd be willing to bet you are skiing with both your weight on your heels and, more importantly, too much weight on your inside ski. You should try to work on separating the upper and lower body, angulate vs bank, your inside leg should get 'shorter' as your outside leg gets 'longer' during a turn. Your shoulders should remain level, the inside shoulder and hand should not drop down into the slope. Your feet should be wider apart and  your weight balance should be balanced but forward. Imagine the body positioning for playing defense in basketball- knees and hips flexed, weight balanced over the feet, not back on your heels, hands up and in front of you at the bottom of your visual plane- that's what skiing should feel like, in balance but ready to move in any direction. 

 

post #4 of 16

My outside tail was slipping out on icy turns this weekend.   I think I keep an athletic stance most of the time, but was able to rectify the problem by focusing on pressing my shin into the boot going into the turn.  No more slippage even though the edges need to be sharpened.  I could almost feel the ski straightening when it should and balancing the power between front and back.

 

Got used to too much powder last year.

post #5 of 16

I agree with Whiteroom except about the feet wide apart.  The correct leg width is with the legs coming straight down from the hip sockets.  Walking width and skiing width are the same.*  When he describes shortening the inside leg on a turn so there isn't too much weight on the inside ski, that doesn't change the width between the legs.

 

So...stand easy on the balls of your feet.  Do not try to pressure the boot tongues with your shins by squatting, that's too much work and locks you into an ineffective position.  Stand on the balls of your feet and hinge forward at your ankles.  While moving there is no difference between having the body forward or the feet back, but there is a big difference in how that is achieved.  Our legs have three strong hamstring muscles that can pull our feet backward with ease.  As you begin each turn strongly pull both feet back.  You'll find out how far you need to pull them back depending on the steepness of the pitch, the tightness of your turn, and the characteristics of your skis.

 

And, some skis just chatter due to their less-than-perfect internal design & construction. 

 

*exceptions for stance width---an unaligned bow legged skier needs the feet wider apart.  An unaligned knock kneed skier need the feet very close together.  A skier with sloppy loose boots needs a wide stance for stability.  A skier with good natural alignment or correctly aligned by a good boot fitter in boots that fit uses the natural walking-width stance.

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiFox View Post
 

Something that really annoys me at times is when the fronts of my skis "click" together.  I don't look down at my skis, but I can hear it.  They don't always do this.  My analysis is that if I had more weight on the front of my skis, it would be impossible for them to do that.  Am I right?  I keep trying to lean forward, keeping my shins in contact with the front of my boots, but we all know that what we try to do and what we actually do is sometimes different.

 

Any other ideas?


What length is the ski compared to your weight and does it happen at slow or high speed?

post #7 of 16

Does this only happen whey you are going straight, between turns, or does it happen when you are turning too?

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

A few things for clarification:  I weigh 115 and am 5' 1" tall.  I have Dynastar Legend Powder skis that are 158's.  We were skiing at Wolf Creek in powder that was about 8 inches deep.  The skis seemed to click together when I turned. We were in the Waterfall area, but with the deep snow, I don't feel that I was going very fast.

 

Whiteroom - You said you thought besides being on my heels (I probably was because I haven't skied in powder as much as I'd like), you thought perhaps I had too much weight on my inside ski.  I usually warm up on hard-packed snow by skiing on one ski (the downhill ski) for a few turns to make sure my weight is on the correct ski. Maybe this was a problem because I was skiing in powder and was trying to distribute my weight over BOTH skis? The weight of the powder snow did seem to push me back on my heels even though I was trying to concentrate and keep my hands out in front of me.

 

Also, I tend to ski with my skis together (old school) and I was purposely trying to keep them apart in a natural stance in the powder snow.

post #9 of 16
Hitting your skiis together in powder does happen. Skis with huge shovels make it worse. It's not a huge deal, as long as you don't cross your tips. Your stance in powder should be about the same as in hard snow, except maby a little wider if you have wide skis
Edited by clink83 - 11/30/15 at 12:28pm
post #10 of 16

In regards to the "old school technique" it is interesting that it is the symptom of a clicking sound from shovel contact that are your grounds for complaint and inquiry rather than the performance outcome of the same genesis. In other words, if your skis are clicking, I might recommend that the annoying sound could be the least of your concern. If this is the case, Whiteroom has competently and completely redressed your entire technique to "fashion forward", stick figure not withholding.

 

That said, a closer stance, more evenly weighted skis, wider skis and unstable platform in powder are all appropriate or naturally occurring precedents to your complaint, something Clink covered well enough.

 

My opinion? I think you've got a foot in both puddles. If this is the case, my recommendation is a pair of dry socks and waterproof shoes.

post #11 of 16

Also strive for equal edge angles (no A-frame).  An outside ski sinking due to being on a higher edge angle can cause it to bump into the other ski.

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Ah-h-h-h, I think maybe you have something there.  I do remember my knees coming together due to apprehension, thus creating the A-frame!

post #13 of 16

You perhaps keep the skis too flat to the snow?

post #14 of 16

Also check alignment to be sure that you are not riding both inside edges of your skis due to improper alignment.

post #15 of 16
While ghost's comment regarding being in "3D" snow and the outside ski tipped more than the inside ski will result in the outside ski being "pushed" into the inside ski is very astute, based on the OP's comments on his technique, I don't think he is tipping enough in the pow for this to be the case. I think that Razie's simpler suggestion may be the particular issue for this skier. The flat skis of less dynamic turns in powder are much more free to swivel laterally and perhaps, as well, more likely to produce the "clacking" sound than the other.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
 

I agree with Whiteroom except about the feet wide apart.  The correct leg width is with the legs coming straight down from the hip sockets.  Walking width and skiing width are the same.*  When he describes shortening the inside leg on a turn so there isn't too much weight on the inside ski, that doesn't change the width between the legs. You mean the width between the feet.....As you inclinate your legs get closer together. No way around it, but your feet stay similar width apart. 

although feet width vary some  too. Look at Hermann's Legs and then his feet!

 

 

 

 

 

So...stand easy on the balls of your feet.  Do not try to pressure the boot tongues with your shins by squatting, that's too much work and locks you into an ineffective position.  Stand on the balls of your feet and hinge forward at your ankles.  While moving there is no difference between having the body forward or the feet back, but there is a big difference in how that is achieved.  Our legs have three strong hamstring muscles that can pull our feet backward with ease.  As you begin each turn strongly pull both feet back.  You'll find out how far you need to pull them back depending on the steepness of the pitch, the tightness of your turn, and the characteristics of your skis.

 

And, some skis just chatter due to their less-than-perfect internal design & construction. 

 

*exceptions for stance width---an unaligned bow legged skier needs the feet wider apart.  An unaligned knock kneed skier need the feet very close together.  A skier with sloppy loose boots needs a wide stance for stability.  A skier with good natural alignment or correctly aligned by a good boot fitter in boots that fit uses the natural walking-width stance.

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