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Smoking Cat skiing Deal at Chatter Creek

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

If you have Catskiing on your bucket list here's a SMOKIN Deal going on at Chatter Creek Catskiing. This place is the real deal, Iconic Mountain lodge, 5 Star food and Mind blowing terrain.

 

 

Take advantage of the Exchange rate and gather a few friends for the trip of a lifetime. Trust me this place is off the hook good!

 

post #2 of 27

$800 per day is a deal?

post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
 

$800 per day is a deal?

Well.....he said he was smokin'.......

 

=)

post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hopefully your Backcountry skiing skills are better than your math skills! Just Kidding there. 2 days for $1250 equals $625 a day which covers food, skiing, lodging.

 

Here's a little price comparison if you travel to ski for a weekend on groomers or chunder.

 

$175  2 Lift tickets at a crowded resort 

$600  3 nights lodging at a resort 

$200  5 Star Food   

$975

post #5 of 27

That is better.  I was looking at their posted rates on their site. A bit over $1600 for 2 days if I read it right.

 

Just checked their site again and no mention of anything under $1625 for 2 days.  If offering a deal they maybe should mention it somewhere?


Edited by crank - 11/19/15 at 7:10am
post #6 of 27

Not sure why in your comp you list 3 nights at a hotel.  Guessing Chatter Creek is only giving 1 day. Good deal if you can get there and have other things to fit around the 2 days, just don't think your comp makes sense.

post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 


They bring you in the night before on this trip. So thats the reason for the comparision of 3 nights.

post #8 of 27

I have been to Chatter Creek 4x.  One of the trips, in 2008, was some of the best snow I have ever skied, along with Chatter Creek's photographer in the cat to record the occasion: http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6356

 

Regular season rates, Jan. 15 - Mar. 18 are ~$1,100CDN per day.  After several years at par exchange rates or worse, we Americans can knock ~25% off those prices, so yes, Canadian cat skiing is cheaper now for Americans than it has been in several years.

 

The "smokin deal" at $625/day is for shoulder season in December.  I have expressed the view before that choosing shoulder seasons for cat/heli skiing is a dangerous gamble. The reason you're paying the big bucks is for killer powder and great terrain.  Weather is unpredictable as it is, so why lower your odds of getting what you're paying for?

post #9 of 27

Nov 10th. 

 

 

Early season is a gable when there is no base. But the base is good already this year and December often has the deepest quality snow of the season.   

 

 

post #10 of 27

Pictures like those above can be cherry picked and really give no clue as to the reality of skiing.  Nonetheless several resorts in western Canada opened this weekend with far above normal base depths and open acreage.  So if you're tempted to push the envelope with one of these early season offers, this would be a promising year to do that.

post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 

Whats up with all the negativity with you people? Its seems that no one can reply to anything without it being a sharp jab or taking things too literal.  Skiing is skiing, shoulder season or high season. It's a game of chance. I've had many a trip in January, February suck because of the weather and I've had EPIC trips in Mid December or late March. If $300, $600 or $1000 a day is to much for you to spend on skiing, I understand just no need to berate someone for it. 

People need to relax, skiing is about having fun.

post #12 of 27
Quote:
Whats up with all the negativity with you people?

Marketing people will try to sell anything, even when conditions suck. It costs the same to run a cat/heli operation at any time of the year.   If the price is discounted, it's due to lower demand because knowledgeable skiers know the odds are riskier.  I try to provide a reality check in terms of optimal times of the season and what the historical context is.

 

I think I have pointed out some very relevant positives here:

1) Canadian exchange rate is the best it has been in quite awhile.

2) Even though mid-November is usually way too early to be drawing conclusions about the current season, the start in western Canada is so far above average right now that early season deals may be more worthwhile than usual.

post #13 of 27

The base is good. 60inches at tree line.   Those early storms were heavy and have knocked down a lot of the alders and other brush. The grassy slopes are in their prime right now, and the alpine is almost there. The skiing is good now. 

 

 

You're a numbers guy Tony, you can see that it's colder and snows way more in the early season than late in the interior.  If you want good snow and you're playing the odds than Dec-Jan is your time. 

 

More Cherry picking. (from RMR Facebook)

 

 

 

Another winter storm warning today. 20cm at valley bottom. 

post #14 of 27

While I haven't been up, yet, I am hearing (and seeing, as in the picture above this post) that early conditions in the interior are epic this year. We've had some of our very best days in the shoulder seasons. Odds are pretty good that Chatter will be excellent, barring some unspeakable event like a (rhymes with crabapple) express. Even then, they're generally high enough and far enough away from the gun-sights that they'll be good. I think this is a really good deal, especially if paid for with U.S. currency.

post #15 of 27

Mica keeps it real. 

 

post #16 of 27
Quote = surfacehoar:
You're a numbers guy Tony, you can see that it's colder and snows way more in the early season than late in the interior.  If you want good snow and you're playing the odds than Dec-Jan is your time. 

Canadian interior snow is a little bit more front ended than in the US.  For comparable intermountain high snowfall climates:

Mt. Fidelity near Rogers Pass averages 61% of season snowfall before Jan. 31

Grand Targhee averages 56% of season snowfall before Jan. 31

Alta averages 52% of season snowfall before Jan. 31

 

That said, Chatter Creek is not in the BC interior ranges (Selkirks, Purcells), it's in the Canadian Rockies and averages 350 inches at its lodge vs. 450-500 at comparable elevation in the Selkirks or Monashees.

Quote = Goldmember:
barring some unspeakable event like a (rhymes with crabapple) express. Even then, they're generally high enough and far enough away from the gun-sights that they'll be good

Yes, Chatter Creek is unquestionably the safest bet in cat skiing to avoid rain.  They had ski terrain above the infamous Tropical Punch of January 2005, and that's why I started going there in 2007.

 

The disadvantages to December are:

1) It takes a very deep snowpack to build out all the cat roads.  You will have plenty of acreage but it will be far from the 50,000 that Chatter has mid-season.

2) Chatter's best skiing is in the alpine and the light may be difficult.  Most cat operations are skewed more toward tree skiing where flat light is not an issue.

3) Hours could be slightly shorter than in later months with longer daylight.

 

Accepting that we have a great start to the snowpack, the value proposition of the early deal could easily outweigh the 3 factors above.

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

The disadvantages to December are:

1) It takes a very deep snowpack to build out all the cat roads.  You will have plenty of acreage but it will be far from the 50,000 that Chatter has mid-season. - Not only deep snowpack but time to get them built. It takes awhile to get the system built out but, with a good snowpack, they can get an early start compared to many years.

 

2) Chatter's best skiing is in the alpine and the light may be difficult.  Most cat operations are skewed more toward tree skiing where flat light is not an issue. - This is true all winter, there. They can have flat light any time.

 

3) Hours could be slightly shorter than in later months with longer daylight. - True but, with early season legs, slightly shorter days are often welcome by some.

 

Accepting that we have a great start to the snowpack, the value proposition of the early deal could easily outweigh the 3 factors above. - Probably the most important aspect to consider of this, as this is a good price and likely a good season to take advantage of it.

 

To each, their own for determination of value.

post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfacehoar View Post
 

Mica keeps it real. 

 

 

Do you know Dave P.? I just noticed that this was posted on his FB page. Looks pretty sweet! I liked the narrative under the video:

 

"Last week, Mica President Paul Norrie, Operations Manager Dave Pehowich, and Chief Pilot Matthew Callahan made the first turns of the season up at Mica. “Wow! Certainly not the time to ask for a raise”, said Norrie, grinning from ear to ear. “The lower elevations have three feet more snow than all of last season, and every turn today was thigh to waist deep!”
Enjoying their own Private Program, the crew spent the day making snowpack observations and “quality checks” on classic runs such as Kokanee Trees, Wildcat and Golden. With three weeks still to go before the arrival of our first guests, and more snow falling today, we really couldn’t ask for a better start to the 2015-16 season."

 

I think it's safe to say that we're off to a muuuuuch better start than all of last year.

post #19 of 27

Hey Freeride I have spent the summer and fall crunching numbers to get as much as I can out of a big trip, so it is just a place I have been.  Didn't mean to harsh it.  Plus there has been no snow worth while to go to here.  Been watching the season develop out your way.  Have thought all along it is going to be a better year than last year el Nino be damned. 

 

Drawbacks to early season skiing include more avalanche prone slopes, more likelihood of injury tree skiing due to stump and tree fall, fewer lines filled in above and shorter, colder days.

 

I am sure the pros know their terrain and snow pack and are safe.  The reasons I listed above will combine with the roads still being put in to possibly limit terrain.

 

Given the price differential for the premium months it is quite a deal to live the high life.   Since the product Chatter Creek delivers is essentially the same throughout the year, I do think the price difference represents the consumer confidence in when the best skiing is from a long way out.  The prime weeks cost significantly higher than the shoulder seasons and I think most of the people who have that sort of change like to make prudent decisions with their money especially when it costs more.  This high season seems seems consistent across the industry..

post #20 of 27

This talk about shoulder season skiing and how good it could be brought this trip to mind. This was shot Dec 14th and 15th in 2007. Very early season but....well, watch for yourselves.

 

 

post #21 of 27

This is an old thread but still relevant.  Regarding late season at Chatter Creek, given their larger tenure and location, featuring higher elevations than all other BC cat ops, isn't Chatter the safest bet of them all in late March?  Even now in late April, Chatter still has sub zero temps at their peak elevations according to snow-forcast.  So on Chatter's website they have a considerable amount of availability in the late season at their best prices.  More available spots in late season tours than December tours.  There are comments above about snow road creation and how they require a lot of snow to build so in December Chatter would likely not have as much access.  I guess what I'm saying is that you'd think the late season trips would fill up faster than the early season trips due to the longer days with more available terrain.  Chatter's peak elevation is 2900, now I don't know how many of their peaks are that high, but I don't see how a late March trip at Chatter would be any riskier than an early March trip at almost any other cat op due to CC's higher elevations.  

post #22 of 27

DanH's comparison of Chatter vs. other cat operators for late season is valid ... to a point. Yes, the higher altitude/cooler temps will delay the onset of spring vs. other ops.  However, from late March onwards you still need north exposure to preserve powder.   Chatter has far flung terrain with variable exposures and even when conditions are good you don't get a huge amount of vertical due to the time it takes to move around.  So I think the actual ski time in good powder will be relatively limited in late season unless it has snowed quite recently and stays cold. 

 

Most cat ops I would avoid going later than first week of March.  Chatter I might add a couple of weeks to that.  By late March I would be inclined toward heli not cat skiing.  The heli can position all of your runs in high altitude and north facing if that's what's necessary.  My first Canadian heli days were March 28-29, 1998 at TLH and they were impressive indeed.

Quote = Mainiac:
The prime weeks cost significantly higher than the shoulder seasons and I think most of the people who have that sort of change like to make prudent decisions with their money especially when it costs more.  This high season seems seems consistent across the industry..

Yes, and Chatter Creek's high season pricing does run a week or two later than the other places, just as Mustang's starts a week or two earlier.

 

Shoulder season deals are great for those who live within a couple of days' drive and can book last minute knowing conditions are right.  For those of us living thousands of miles away and advance booking for once a year or a special occasion, not so much.

post #23 of 27
Someone posted on TGR,
it is currently raining to the top and Unskiable mank.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

 

Shoulder season deals are great for those who live within a couple of days' drive and can book last minute knowing conditions are right.  For those of us living thousands of miles away and advance booking for once a year or a special occasion, not so much.

I quite agree. The whole concept of taking ANY kind of chance on heli or cat skiing doesn't seem to make sense. 

 

With luck, I can get amazing powder skiing in a decent ski resort. Paying the premium of heli/cat to me is to pretty much guarantee powder, without taking much chance. So going on shoulder season seems to defeat that purpose.

 

Unless, of course, you're already there and the condition is good, then you're in a good position to jump on that smoking deal 

post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 


I've had some incredible powder days in late March and even April but the chance of having warmer temps and soft sticky snow are a lot more likely during late season than December. I still am a huge believer in December and early January trips because of the higher chance of continual snowfall. The base might not be 8' deep but it's soft!  It's all a somewhat manageable risk no matter what time of the season!  You can live in a Glass house and not take any chances or get out and take a calculated risk. It's all good!

post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 

For all you Nay sayers, Here's a video we shot in mid December in British Columbia.

 

post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
 

I quite agree. The whole concept of taking ANY kind of chance on heli or cat skiing doesn't seem to make sense. 

 

 

I've had pretty good luck just booking Southwest into Spokane in January.  If the weather looks good, bring one other really good skier and a wallet full of cash.

If not, cancel with no change fee.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeride View Post
 


I've had some incredible powder days in late March and even April but the chance of having warmer temps and soft sticky snow are a lot more likely during late season than December. I still am a huge believer in December and early January trips because of the higher chance of continual snowfall. The base might not be 8' deep but it's soft!  It's all a somewhat manageable risk no matter what time of the season!  You can live in a Glass house and not take any chances or get out and take a calculated risk. It's all good!

 

 

True, but your risk is a lot lower when your already there.

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