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New Skis and Boots [northeast, last purchase Rossignol Cut 9.6 15 years ago]

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

 

I need some help buying new skis and boots. I am 6'1, 185lbs, 45 year old, former racer in my teens in the 80's. Didn't ski for 10 years then went back to skiing recreationally in '99 when I bought a pair of Rossignol Cut 9.6 184cm skis and Nordica Grad Prix boots (they had a few versions; I bought the silver and blue ones). I've been skiing with the same boots and skis for the last 15 years (about 10 days per year). I ski groomed trails only, mostly the east coast, though we go to the west Coast or to Europe once in a while. My boot liners have fallen apart (though the shells are still fine) and nobody will service my bindings anymore hence I am looking for new boots and skis. 

 

First the boots: I am surprised all new boots are super soft. I have narrow feet so I fit in race boots and tried the Nordica Dobberman 120. They still seem to flex more than my old Grand Prix but the main thing is they are a lot more upright than my old boots. I like the aggressive forward angle of my old boots. Most shops don't recommend putting new liners on a 15-16 year old boot, but I am tempted as I am very used to and comfortable with the old boots. So my dilemma is whether to spend half the money and put new custom liners or get new boots.

 

Skis: I learned on straight skis and almost bought straight skis in '99 - they were still available back then. I ended up buying skis with a side cut  - Rossignol Cut 9.6 184cm - and was very impressed how easy they were to turn. I am now looking at the Atomics (never had a pair but always wanted one going back to the '70s!). I see most new skis are very wide. I was thinking Nomad Blackeye TI 181cm (127-81-111) - went to the store to see them and they look to me pretty wide in person. I also looked at Atomic Redster Xt 170 (118-72-106) - 170 was the longest they had. These looked more like traditional skis.I ski mostly on groomed trails, on hard pack or ice, so I don't think wide skis are for me. 

 

Any help will be appreciated. I need to buy without testing the skis as we don't live close to a resort and I want to get this over with and get ready for the season. I suspect I will get used to whatever I get and won't know any better, but still want to try to make a more informed decision. Thanks!

post #2 of 14

Skis: If you ski mostly hardpack, groomed trails and ice, you are correct;  wide skis are not your best choice.  Stick with skis under 75 mm.  Your best bet is a race ski or one-step-down from race ski (cheater race skis).  

Suggest you look at Stöckli Laser SX, Head World cup Rebels i. Speed, Fischer RC4 Worldcup SC (shorter turns) or RC (longer turns), Kästle RX12, Nordica Dobermann SLR (short turns) GSR Plate (long turns).

Also suggest you rent wide skis (with tip rocker and camber underfoot) when you ski west coast.

 

Boots: Not all plastic is created equally, I would go for new custom fitted liners after very close inspection, impact testing and flex testing of shells.

 

If you go with new boots, they come in a range of flex ratings from 80 to 150.  Many can be adjusted for forward lean, canting, cuff alignment, etc.  You just have to look for them.  The best advice is to find a good boot fitter.  Good luck with that.


Edited by Ghost - 11/18/15 at 7:11am
post #3 of 14
And remember, boots always feel softer in the shop where lots of times the temperatures are in the 70's, not the 20's.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

And remember, boots always feel softer in the shop where lots of times the temperatures are in the 70's, not the 20's.


Yup, but they are a lot easier to crush when you are making a hard turn at 40 mph than when you are standing still in a shop. 

At least you have your old boots to compare to.

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your replies. I will bring my old boots to the store for them to inspect and also for comparison purposes if I end up having to buy a new pair.

 

I will do more research on the skis suggested, but in the meanwhile I was looking more closely at what Atomic has to offer. The Nomad Blackeye Ti from my original post that I saw at the store is not the best choice as it is too wide. I now see Atomic has a narrower Nomad Temper Ti 181 cm, waist 73mm. That may be an option for me. Then I see the Redster XTi 176cm, waist 72mm and only about $100 more. Has anyone tried any of these? Do you have an opinion on the ARC technology/float deck/single anchor point system on the Nomads? Thanks!

post #6 of 14

Forget the Nomads, just get one of the skis Ghost mentioned

 

As for boots, if the Dobermann fit you well, there is also a GPX 130, GP 130 and WC 150.  You might also want to look at the Head Raptor B3 which comes in a 140 flex.  The Head is a 97mm last and the Nordica is, I think, 98mm.  Lange RS 140 is also a 97mm last.  As to the forward lean, modern skis don't take terribly well to what we now call excessive forward lean.  That doesn't really apply to the skis Ghost recommended.  And a good boot fitter can increase the forward lean.

post #7 of 14

Wow, the Cut 9.6. 

Are you at all disposed to taking lessons?

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Wow, the Cut 9.6. 

Are you at all disposed to taking lessons?

LOL. I haven't thought about it. Between my little kid, my wife and everything else that goes on on a family vacation I am lucky to have a few runs by myself here and there. Besides, at this point, not only due to age but mostly due to very little skiing, I lack the conditioning to do more than a few runs at a time at my old pace. I don't ski seriously enough any more to have any aspirations. We only ski one vacation per season (5-6 days) plus a weekend day here and there - maybe a total of 10 full days per season. It will take a lot of skiing for me to get back in shape in order to benefit from any instruction. Plus, I don't feel right taking myself away from my family to do my own thing when we have limited time for skiing. Actually, I am not sure - I may have to think about it.

 

On another note - I just bought a pair of Atomics Redster D2 3.0 XT 175cm. Thank you all for the advice, particularly the recommendations by Ghost - I did some research, almost got a pair from Ghost's list, but at the end ended up buying the Atomics - I've always wanted a pair of Atomics going back to the 70's and always managed to get something else instead. It is like growing up wanting a Mercedes - now the BWM may be the better car but you still want a Mercedes :) I really do appreciate all the recommendations though.

 

Next on the list is to bring my old Nordica Grand Prix boots to the store to see if they are still good to be fitted with new custom liners. If not, will have to do more boots research... 

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgrd0q View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Wow, the Cut 9.6. 

Are you at all disposed to taking lessons?

LOL. I haven't thought about it. Between my little kid, my wife and everything else that goes on on a family vacation I am lucky to have a few runs by myself here and there. Besides, at this point, not only due to age but mostly due to very little skiing, I lack the conditioning to do more than a few runs at a time at my old pace. I don't ski seriously enough any more to have any aspirations. We only ski one vacation per season (5-6 days) plus a weekend day here and there - maybe a total of 10 full days per season. It will take a lot of skiing for me to get back in shape in order to benefit from any instruction. Plus, I don't feel right taking myself away from my family to do my own thing when we have limited time for skiing. Actually, I am not sure - I may have to think about it.

 

On another note - I just bought a pair of Atomics Redster D2 3.0 XT 175cm. Thank you all for the advice, particularly the recommendations by Ghost - I did some research, almost got a pair from Ghost's list, but at the end ended up buying the Atomics - I've always wanted a pair of Atomics going back to the 70's and always managed to get something else instead. It is like growing up wanting a Mercedes - now the BWM may be the better car but you still want a Mercedes :) I really do appreciate all the recommendations though.

 

Next on the list is to bring my old Nordica Grand Prix boots to the store to see if they are still good to be fitted with new custom liners. If not, will have to do more boots research... 

Do think about it a bit.  I was an intermediate when I got my daughter started on skis at age 4.  Learned as a teen but didn't ski much for a few decades.  Waited until my daughter was an advanced skier until I started taking lessons myself.  She learned in ski school so I picked up a few ideas here and there from her instructors.  We were skiing about 10 days in the southeast plus a spring break trip to Alta once she could do blues there.  Had I known what I know now ten years later, I would've had more fun and not had as much to undo if I'd taken a few lessons when she was in ski school.

 

If your budget can handle it, a private lesson for 2-3 hours with an experienced instructor (PSIA Level 3 is good) with 10+ years of experience is a worthwhile investment.  Could ask for recommendations by name for specific ski areas.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgrd0q View Post
 

Besides, at this point, not only due to age but mostly due to very little skiing, I lack the conditioning to do more than a few runs at a time at my old pace. I don't ski seriously enough any more to have any aspirations. We only ski one vacation per season (5-6 days) plus a weekend day here and there - maybe a total of 10 full days per season. It will take a lot of skiing for me to get back in shape in order to benefit from any instruction. Plus, I don't feel right taking myself away from my family to do my own thing when we have limited time for skiing. Actually, I am not sure - I may have to think about it.

Couple of things to think about, actually. One is that you've created a vicious cycle; not enough skiing to get in shape, not in enough shape to ski much. You can get in shape off the slope, y'know. A stationary bike for instance, or a stairmaster use a lot of the same muscles. If you don't belong to a gym and don't want to, go run some hills or stairs. 

 

Two, emphasize about taking time away from the family. Solutions: Have the whole family take a lesson. More fun that way, everyone benefits, more cost efficient, you get to cut lines. 

post #11 of 14

I can't imagine how many ski days it would take to get into skiing shape.  That's one reason why I work out in a gym all year, ride road bikes and mountain bikes, hike and also run.  45 years old and you're talking about age?  I wish I was forty five again so I could take better care of myself for the next 25 years.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Good point about exercise. We have Total Gym at home and I do the stationary bike mostly for cardio purposes. That keeps me generally in shape, but no way can I ski like I used to when I did it on a daily basis in my teens. My thighs will absolutely kill me. This is not a priority though - I enjoy skiing leisurely with the family and having a few runs here at there by myself at a faster pace.
post #13 of 14

George Foreman became the world heavy weight boxing champion at age 45 with a 10th round knock out.   Just say'n.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgrd0q View Post
 
Good point about exercise. We have Total Gym at home and I do the stationary bike mostly for cardio purposes. That keeps me generally in shape, but no way can I ski like I used to when I did it on a daily basis in my teens. My thighs will absolutely kill me. This is not a priority though - I enjoy skiing leisurely with the family and having a few runs here at there by myself at a faster pace.


Since you seem interested in skiing in general, all the more reason to take a lesson.  If you learn more about how to use the skis, you are much less likely to have burning thighs.  Short story: my ski buddy for trips out west is in his 60s, advanced skier since the 1960s, took a few semi-private lessons with me last season out west, after the first lesson he was more than willing to take another because of how much less effort it took for him to make turns.  I've become an advanced skier after age 55 with the help of PSIA Level 3 instructors both in VA and out west.  Had I known what I know now, I would've taken a few lessons ten years ago when I put my daughter in ski school starting at age 4.  I was an intermediate as a working adult after skiing for two seasons as a teen.

 

One way to see how your fitness matches up with the muscles most relevant to skiing is the self-evaluation by Bumps for Boomers, which is based in Aspen.

 

http://www.bumpsforboomers.com/basic-ski-fitness-free-online-video-skiing-exercises

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