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Need advice

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm an advanced snowboarder, but have recently wanted to try skiing. Only problem is that due to a traumatic injury when I was younger, my right hand was amputated and I wouldn't be able to hold a pole. I guess I'm just curious if it would be possible to become a good skier without poles? Could I use only one pole or would that throw me off? Would I look like an idiot without poles?

post #2 of 13

Welcome to epic goose.

 

Skiing without poles is fine.  Using only one might be a bit odd, but possibly helpful if you need something to push you along on flat sections.  You could try both ways.

post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

Welcome to epic goose.

 

Skiing without poles is fine.  Using only one might be a bit odd, but possibly helpful if you need something to push you along on flat sections.  You could try both ways.


Aren't there adaptive skiers who ski without an arm?

 

Paging @T-Square , he's an adaptive instructor.

post #4 of 13
Yes. But he said hand. There are adaptive ski poles. Outriggers that would work.
post #5 of 13
Skiing without poles is very doable. Andy Mahrer, steve's son, made an early free ride career of it as his trade mark
post #6 of 13
Not exactly relevant but this reminded me of an anecdote.

Once I was watching one of those half pipe contests on tv and one kid in the skier division went without poles and the announcers went on and on about the subtle differences between skiing with and without poles, the advantages and disadvantage of both, the intricacies of strategy that would lead one to opt one way or another, etc. At the end of his run, the roving reporter asked him about the factors that went into his strategic choice to eschew the poles. "Oh, I broke my hand; that's why I don't have poles." I cracked up.

I think you'll be fine. I see pole less skiers from time to time. Maybe there are some prosthetic solutions you could look into if you want to try poles eventually.
post #7 of 13

You can definitely ski without poles.  In some ways it forces you to be a better skier.  When you are learning, it's one less distraction, allowing you to focus on controlling your skis and balance.  Once you are a decent skier poles can be a crutch, allowing you to get away with mistakes.

 

That said, I'm sure that there are options for adaptive equipment.  I would steer clear of using only one pole mostly because I think it would create imbalance issues, or at least make it more challenging to stay balanced.

post #8 of 13

I'd think that skiing with ONE pole should be considered while starting. 

 

It would make it easier to get back up after falling. 

 

Not as important is being able to step out of bindings. 

 

Keep us posted on what you decide on.

post #9 of 13
I would think as an advanced snow boarder, OP will be fine with getting up after falling. My opinion is that a single pole would be more trouble than it's worth.
post #10 of 13

Not a problem to ski without poles.  No one is going to say you look strange.  I've got a buddy that lost both hands in Vietnam.  He's also an adaptive instructor.  There are times he skis with two poles.  He uses his hooks to hold on to them.  It works for him.  Then there are times he skis without poles.  Here's a picture of him teaching a blind skier at one of the VA/DAV Winter Sports Clinics out in Aspen.

 

 

So, as the Nike ad says.  Just Do It!

 

And have fun.

post #11 of 13

I used to be superstitious about skiing without poles, and if I forgot them I would rent some.  Then one day I broke my wrist skiing with a few hours of skiing left on my day ticket.  Clutching a pole in that hand was annoyingly painful, so I left my poles at the top of the hill for the rest of the day.  It was easy.   Since then I've had many occasions to ski without poles.  It's easy, no big deal.

 

Skiing without poles is no problem.  Lots of people do it.  You can skate easier than you can push yourself around with poles.

Skiing with one pole is awkward.  Two or none.

post #12 of 13
This 1 time. I had a sit ski lesson and did a warm up run before lesson with no poles. Jumped out in some heavy deep 2'cut up snow on 151cm sl skis. It wasn't fun.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by goose2015 View Post
 

I'm an advanced snowboarder, but have recently wanted to try skiing. Only problem is that due to a traumatic injury when I was younger, my right hand was amputated and I wouldn't be able to hold a pole. I guess I'm just curious if it would be possible to become a good skier without poles? Could I use only one pole or would that throw me off? Would I look like an idiot without poles?

 

 

The proper answer is Yes and Yes and NO, whatever works for you.  After skiing with 2 poles for some odd 40 plus years I broke a pole one day and didn't want to go rent 2 so I just skied with no poles.  This was very foreign to me and I felt out of timing, had nothing to push myself along slight uphill traverses etc.  I skied to the bottom where I had left my one good pole and grabbed it and tried again.  Amazingly this worked very well.  I carried my pole in my L hand and proceeded to match the normal L hand pole use with my R hand.  Doing the normal movements for forward carrying and planting with my empty hand just as if there was a pole in that hand.  This worked really well and actually made my skiing more precise and correct while I was trying harder. 

 

Welcome to Epic and by all means report back and let us know how it goes for you.  You can access yourself to some verry experienced skiers, instructors, bootfitters and just overall good people and we would love to have you along for the ride this winter.   Again, Welcome to Epic a site for real skiers.

 

Skiing with Epic is great.

 

 

 

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