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4-day ski trip @ Stowe, VT - too long or just right?

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 

Hi I have 4-days off for x'mas (Dec 24th - 27th) and I already booked a flight to Burlington VT for a ski trip.  I'd like to know if skiing all 4 days @ Stowe, VT is too much (overkill)? I am tempted to ski one day at Bolten Valley because of the close proximity, and / or spend 1-day at Smuggs.  If so it will be spending 2-day at Stowe.  

I find an Airbnb place near Stowe for 3-night stay.  I am an adv. beginner and mostly skied at PA (I am from NoVA), also been to Snowshoe and Killington, VT.  I have never tried tree line skiing and not sure if I am comfortable of trying this yet,  hence I probably will not be visiting Jay's peak.  

 

Any advice you guys can offer will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks in advance.  

 

Mod note: moved to Resorts, Conditions & Travel

post #2 of 35

First, barring a major December snowstorm, nobody skis trees in Vermont in December.  There's too much "stuff" (rocks, tree stumps, etc.) that needs to get covered up.  So, you probably don't have to worry about ducking into the trees.

 

Stowe has one of the most powerful snow making systems in the north-east, so if it gets cold and stays cold, they should be able to get a fair amount of terrain open.  However, as a self-described advanced beginner, you might find that Stowe's blue-square trails are steeper than what you're used to in the mid-Atlantic.  That said, they do have one of the most wide-open beginner hills around.  This is it:

 

(Well, not the trail on the far left...).  All those buildings in the foreground are the Stowe Mountain Lodge.

 

I have yet to get bored skiing Stowe and I get there 30, 40 times a year.  I think one of the great characteristics of Stowe is that all of their trails ski differently; they feel unique.  But that involves subtleties that advanced beginners might not appreciate.

 

It's up to you...  you'd see every trail quite a few times over four days.  Variety can be good too.

 

Be aware that while Google Maps shows that Stowe and Smuggler's Notch are a 10 minute drive apart, the direct road between them is closed in the winter.  In reality, they're about an hour apart.  As you've noticed, there are quite a few areas near Stowe -- Smugglers Notch, Bolton Valley, and Sugarbush.  They're probably all about the same distance from Stowe.

post #3 of 35

I do not think 4 days at Stowe would be too long at all. I am an intermediate to adv intermediate skier, and Stowe is one of those places you can ski over and over again.

 

Stowe's biggest advantage over many places in New England is the length and vertical of its runs. There is a big bonus of extra time on the snow, rather than the chairlift, and that means fewer lift rides for the same amount of skiing--and therefore fewer repetitions which can lead to boredom. Stowe might be expensive, but it has a deserved reputation--including a reputation for being expensive.

 

If you are looking for a change, and some of that could also come with saving $$, Sugarbush has some very accessible terrain on the lower mountain. The Gate House lift is very beginner/low intermediate focused, while Super Bravo has access to more generally intermediate trails, with some long twisting trail options like Jester.

 

If you opt to visit Bolton Valley, be aware of what it is. Bolton Valley will not have much more than the slow Vista Quad running, and does not have the snowmaking capacity to open quickly if the season has a slow start. It is much more of a locals hill. That being said, the lower mountain is very beginner friendly, accessible via a few mid-mountain lifts. Bolton also offers awesome pricing on lessons. $39 for a group, or $110 for a two hour private.

 

Four days at Stowe will not disappoint you at all.

 

For about the same money, and the variety you think you may enjoy, consider starting with a day at Bolton Valley with a group lesson, then try Sugarbush, maybe with a lesson as well. Finish off with two days at Stowe. Those first days getting your legs, taking lessons, and then applying those skills will make the time at Stowe that much more enjoyable. You will have better skills to take advantage of more of what Stowe has to offer.

post #4 of 35
Thread Starter 

Thank Central VT08, that's really good advice, I did not think about that (lessons).  i have a MCP so 1st 2 days @ Stowe is free then 50% off lift ticket thereafter.  Therefore, the cost will not be much for my lift tickets.  I am more concerned about getting bored spending 4 days at the same place, hence looking for some varieties...  Taking lesson at Bolton is a good idea.  I will definitely consider that.  As for Sugarbush, I will be going back to VT with my friends in late Jan. (after MLK wknd), they get a time share in Waitsfield, which is close to Sugarbush  and MRG.  So I will wait to visit Sugarbush in Jan.  

post #5 of 35

Sounds like you are set with the MCP.

 

As an advanced beginner, who I am assuming is going to use that MCP out west, I would highly encourage lessons.

 

A lesson at Stowe is $120. A lift ticket and a group lesson at Bolton Valley your first day would be less expensive. And, again it would allow you to get your legs under you.

 

You are going to get far more out of your MCP if you can develop your skiing as much as possible before your trip. Investments in lessons are a big factor in getting more out of a visit or a larger ski area, especially out west. There are tons of greens and easy groomed blues on the East Coast. You go out west for the things you cannot find as easily here in VT. Stowe will be a good place to offer you challenge, and move that comfort on harder and steeper terrain up and up.

post #6 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by fosphenytoin View Post
 

Thank Central VT08, that's really good advice, I did not think about that (lessons).  i have a MCP so 1st 2 days @ Stowe is free then 50% off lift ticket thereafter.  Therefore, the cost will not be much for my lift tickets.  I am more concerned about getting bored spending 4 days at the same place, hence looking for some varieties...  Taking lesson at Bolton is a good idea.  I will definitely consider that.  As for Sugarbush, I will be going back to VT with my friends in late Jan. (after MLK wknd), they get a time share in Waitsfield, which is close to Sugarbush  and MRG.  So I will wait to visit Sugarbush in Jan.  


The other advantage of taking a lesson during a holiday period is that you won't be waiting as long in a lift line when you are with an instructor.

post #7 of 35

As a novice, a lot of the terrain at Stowe is going to scare the hell out of you.  And don't even think about trees.  That said, there are some nice long runs there for you to enjoy.  Four days there will not bore you, but a day at Smuggs or Jay or Bolton is worth considering. 

post #8 of 35

While Stowe can be intimidating like JimH says, I would agree with CtVT08 in that lessons will be your best bet........... sorry but forget Bolton and Smuggs....... they are nice but can't compare to Stowe at all unless you have a large family and want to save $$$. Only then should they even be on the radar unless we get hit with a HUGE noreaster storm while you are here. Stowe will have PLENTY of terrain for four days and has much better snowmaking capacity. 

 

Take back to back lessons (that is morning lessons two or three days in a row) and really learn and improve your knowledge of Stowe. They have an excellent ski school and you will progress much faster with back to back lesson days, skip lines, and learn where to go on the mountain as it has so many different personalities if you understands it's flow. You will learn to do trails you normally might not do on your own and that is the key to improvement. Enjoy! :) 

post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yo Momma View Post
 

While Stowe can be intimidating like JimH says, I would agree with CtVT08 in that lessons will be your best bet........... sorry but forget Bolton and Smuggs....... they are nice but can't compare to Stowe at all unless you have a large family and want to save $$$. Only then should they even be on the radar unless we get hit with a HUGE noreaster storm while you are here. Stowe will have PLENTY of terrain for four days and has much better snowmaking capacity. 

 

Take back to back lessons (that is morning lessons two or three days in a row) and really learn and improve your knowledge of Stowe. They have an excellent ski school and you will progress much faster with back to back lesson days, skip lines, and learn where to go on the mountain as it has so many different personalities if you understands it's flow. You will learn to do trails you normally might not do on your own and that is the key to improvement. Enjoy! :) 


The counter argument for an intermediate with a tight budget is that if spending a day at Bolton warming up and taking a lesson is substantially less money than a day at Stowe with a group lesson, starting at Bolton is worth considering.  Afterwards OP would be able to get more out of their time at Stowe.

 

Agree that Stowe will have plenty of green/blue terrain by late Dec for an intermediate to be quite happy for 4 days and a stellar ski school.

 

The hour drive to Smuggs is probably not worth it for someone with the MCP.  For an intermediate without the MCP who is interested in lessons, not as clear cut during a holiday period.  On a normal weekend, Smuggs would have shorter lift lines.  But the lifts are pretty slow so might get more skiing time at Stowe for someone skiing mainly blues.  I like the vibe at Smuggs though.  I can see why it's a great place for a family ski vacation.  Very different from Stowe.

post #10 of 35

How long do you plan on skiing each day?  If you will be skiing from opening to close each day, I would say it's worth exploring another mountain.

 

If however, you'll ski for an hour or two, take a break, ski a bit more, grab some lunch, ski a little more, then call it a day by say 2:00, you should be fine sticking to Stowe.  Then go explore happy hour, shopping, spas, and restaurants along the Mountain road and down into Waterbury.  

 

If you want to explore the region, there are plenty of options, but if you just want a fun four day trip with some skiing, and some other activities mixed in, I would say just plan to spend the whole time in Stowe.

post #11 of 35

Last season after the snow conditions out west deteriorated I did a 6 day trip to Vermont, basing my stay in Burlington.  I did 2 days at Stowe, and 1 day each at Bolton, Smuggs, Sugarbush and Gore.
Although I absolutely loved each area, I was pleasantly surprised with Bolton Valley.  No crowds, cheap tickets and food, and excellent terrain.  If I were to do a 4 day trip out there I would ski Bolton, Smuggs, Stowe and Sugarbush.  Gore was so great I could have actually spent 4 entire days there.

post #12 of 35

If you aren't interested in off-piste skiing, Stowe in December will be great! There is enough to keep you busy for 4 days, but if you get tired of lapping the groomers, you can always head over to Sugarbush or Smuggs.

post #13 of 35
Thread Starter 


To Hrspear:  I am a hardcore skier, so I do try to get on the 1st lift chair, ski until the last chair.  Yes, sometimes I eat a heavy b'fast so I can skip lunch and maximize my time on the slope.  Anyway, I m just a bit worried about lapping the same groomers the entire time (as thefortress said) @ Stowe then I may get bored.  

To Maine-skier: yes, I heard good things about Bolten and i think it is under-rated.  

As for Smuggs, per an online review, it is one of the top 10 ski resorts in the east coast but based on the posts I read here.  People don't think much about it?  Not sure why?  (I've never been to either so I can't comment)

I was hoping to get some lessons in before Stowe here in Mid Atlantic.  But looking at the weather, I am not sure if any PA ski resorts will be opening before x'mas.  With that said, I may spend a day or 2 either at Bolten or Smuggs for lessons (before heading to Stowe).  The cost of lessons varies significantly among these 3 resorts (Stowe costs 2x as much).  If you guys have any good instructor that can recommend please pm me.  Thanks again you guys for the valuable advice.  Much appreciated!  

post #14 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by fosphenytoin View Post
 


To Hrspear:  I am a hardcore skier, so I do try to get on the 1st lift chair, ski until the last chair.  Yes, sometimes I eat a heavy b'fast so I can skip lunch and maximize my time on the slope.  Anyway, I m just a bit worried about lapping the same groomers the entire time (as thefortress said) @ Stowe then I may get bored.  

To Maine-skier: yes, I heard good things about Bolten and i think it is under-rated.  

As for Smuggs, per an online review, it is one of the top 10 ski resorts in the east coast but based on the posts I read here.  People don't think much about it?  Not sure why?  (I've never been to either so I can't comment)

I was hoping to get some lessons in before Stowe here in Mid Atlantic.  But looking at the weather, I am not sure if any PA ski resorts will be opening before x'mas.  With that said, I may spend a day or 2 either at Bolten or Smuggs for lessons (before heading to Stowe).  The cost of lessons varies significantly among these 3 resorts (Stowe costs 2x as much).  If you guys have any good instructor that can recommend please pm me.  Thanks again you guys for the valuable advice.  Much appreciated!  

It's fair to say that those who post often on EpicSki are not typical of the skiers at Smuggs.  The Smuggs lift are old and slow.  The advantage is that the slopes tend not to get crowded and the lift lines are shorter than at Stowe on a weekend.  Having been there once, including going over to the beginner area near the slope side resort lodging, I completely understand why it would be a great place to spend a ski vacation for a family with young kids and parent who ski.  There is plenty of advanced terrain with trees and steeps, along with intermediate terrain of assorted types.

 

Did you get bored spending more than a day or two on Killington groomers?  I haven't been there but can't imagine that Stowe groomers are that much different.  But then I've learned how not to get bored at Massanutten (74 acres, no ungroomed terrain) as an advanced skier because I know how to make use of of my time practicing fundamentals that make trips out west more fun.

post #15 of 35

Quote:

Originally Posted by fosphenytoin View Post
 


To Hrspear:  I am a hardcore skier, so I do try to get on the 1st lift chair, ski until the last chair.  Yes, sometimes I eat a heavy b'fast so I can skip lunch and maximize my time on the slope.  Anyway, I m just a bit worried about lapping the same groomers the entire time (as thefortress said) @ Stowe then I may get bored.  

To Maine-skier: yes, I heard good things about Bolten and i think it is under-rated.  

As for Smuggs, per an online review, it is one of the top 10 ski resorts in the east coast but based on the posts I read here.  People don't think much about it?  Not sure why?  (I've never been to either so I can't comment)

I was hoping to get some lessons in before Stowe here in Mid Atlantic.  But looking at the weather, I am not sure if any PA ski resorts will be opening before x'mas.  With that said, I may spend a day or 2 either at Bolten or Smuggs for lessons (before heading to Stowe).  The cost of lessons varies significantly among these 3 resorts (Stowe costs 2x as much).  If you guys have any good instructor that can recommend please pm me.  Thanks again you guys for the valuable advice.  Much appreciated!  

 

Again, to re-iterate the size of Stowe compared to mid-Atlantic areas.  Every lift ride on the main quad or the gondola gets you 2,100 vertical feet; i.e., three times what you're used to in the mid-Atlantic.  Both lifts are pretty fast.  The quad starts at 7:30 on weekends and holidays, and it doesn't usually start getting really busy until around 10:00.  In those 2.5 hours, it is easily possible to rack up well over 20,000 vertical feet of skiing.  There is no runout at Stowe; i.e., you are skiing it every single turn back to the lift.  That's enough to get most people's legs hurting a bit.

 

The Spruce side lifts are shorter, but I believe they still gain well over 1,000 vertical feet each.  If you can ski from first to last chair, more power to you -- I've done it on epic powder days -- but there's a reason the slopes empty out fast after lunch; i.e., most people's legs are fried.

 

As for instructor recommendations...  I don't know anybody at Bolton or Smuggs or anywhere but Stowe.  There are several Stowe instructors who post here -- paging @epic to see if he has any recommendations for you.  Also paging @freeski919

post #16 of 35

Bored at Stowe???? That's a new one........Now I'm really confused! LOL.............

post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yo Momma View Post
 

Bored at Stowe???? That's a new one........Now I'm really confused! LOL.............


Keep in mind the question in Post #13 is about relatively early season skiing (Dec) from someone who has not skied much outside the Mid-Atlantic.  Pretty sure didn't learn until recently and is a working adult without much vacation time.  In the Mid-A, a Christmas ski trip could mean 3-4 green/blue groomers that take even an intermediate perhaps 5 min to finish.

 

When I was an intermediate only skiing out west for 4-5 days every 2-3 years a couple decades ago, I got bored on a powder day with no visibility during a powder storm at Snowbird.  The other intermediates on that Raleigh Ski Club trip didn't even bother to ski that day because they were too scared.  Needless to say, the advanced skiers had a ball skiing off the tram and weren't about to keep an intermediate company who had with no powder experience and wasn't even skiing many black groomers.  It was my second day ever at Snowbird.  Ended up there instead of Alta because that was the easiest way to get a ride from someone who knew how to drive on snow.  Since I learned to ski as a teen in the northeast, low visibility didn't bother me as long as I stayed on green and easy blue trails I'd skied a couple days before.  But that still got old by the afternoon.

post #18 of 35
Thread Starter 

To Marznc:  My sense of direction is very bad and I get lost very easy.  Therefore, whenever I am on a solo ski trip, I become extra cautious.  

 

When I ski alone, I tend to stay on the main trails and I don't venture out to new trails in the afternoons (because afraid the lift maybe closed by the time I find my way back).  One time I skied alone at Snowshoe, 1 main ski lift to the village was closed early so I had to take a diff lift back to the village.  It took me 1.5 hours just find my way to the right lift.  That was a memorable lesson!!! 

 

During my 3-day ski trip to Killington, I was also very "conservative" and did not venture out much.  Because of that, I did "run out of trails" i can explore during that 3 days there.  (plus one main gondola was closed, so that also limited my access to some of trails I wanted to re-visit.)

post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by fosphenytoin View Post
 

To Marznc:  My sense of direction is very bad and I get lost very easy.  Therefore, whenever I am on a solo ski trip, I become extra cautious.  

 

When I ski alone, I tend to stay on the main trails and I don't venture out to new trails in the afternoons (because afraid the lift maybe closed by the time I find my way back).  One time I skied alone at Snowshoe, 1 main ski lift to the village was closed early so I had to take a diff lift back to the village.  It took me 1.5 hours just find my way to the right lift.  That was a memorable lesson!!! 

 

During my 3-day ski trip to Killington, I was also very "conservative" and did not venture out much.  Because of that, I did "run out of trails" i can explore during that 3 days there.  (plus one main gondola was closed, so that also limited my access to some of trails I wanted to re-visit.)


Completely understand.  My DH has no sense of direction.  I'm the opposite so am always the navigator when we do a driving trip.

 

I know it was said before . . . I think that 3-4 days at Stowe would be fine.  You should like Spruce Mountain.  Everything funnels down to pretty much the same place, where all the lifts start.  Don't know if Stowe has one, but if there is a free mountain tour that's always a good way to get to know a new ski resort.  Tours are always on groomers.  The host adjusts the route to match what the group with them is comfortable skiing.  You can always get advice of where to ski in the afternoon from the Guest Services desk.  When they know where you had fun in the morning, they can make recommendations for the afternoon if you want to try something different.

post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by fosphenytoin View Post
 

To Marznc:  My sense of direction is very bad and I get lost very easy.  Therefore, whenever I am on a solo ski trip, I become extra cautious.  

 

When I ski alone, I tend to stay on the main trails and I don't venture out to new trails in the afternoons (because afraid the lift maybe closed by the time I find my way back).  One time I skied alone at Snowshoe, 1 main ski lift to the village was closed early so I had to take a diff lift back to the village.  It took me 1.5 hours just find my way to the right lift.  That was a memorable lesson!!! 

 

During my 3-day ski trip to Killington, I was also very "conservative" and did not venture out much.  Because of that, I did "run out of trails" i can explore during that 3 days there.  (plus one main gondola was closed, so that also limited my access to some of trails I wanted to re-visit.)

 

Stowe is not a place where you need to worry about getting lost. Pretty much everything empties out to the same spot. Its not like Killington which has a half dozen base areas that don't interconnect. If you're on Mansfield, as long as you're not on Toll Road, everything empties out to the Mansfield parking lots. Pretty simple really.

 

As far as getting bored, not something I'd worry too much about. 

post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

Stowe is not a place where you need to worry about getting lost. Pretty much everything empties out to the same spot. Its not like Killington which has a half dozen base areas that don't interconnect. If you're on Mansfield, as long as you're not on Toll Road, everything empties out to the Mansfield parking lots. Pretty simple really.

 

As far as getting bored, not something I'd worry too much about. 

For those who are reading but not posting . . . freeski919 is an instructor at Stowe.  Also has experience skiing in the Mid-Atlantic.

 

As an aside, one of the advantages of Pico over Killington is that Pico is smaller, less crowded, and easier to figure out.  For my solo ski safari last March, I skipped Killington and spent a day at Pico in powder conditions instead.  I've become an advanced skier in recent years, but would have been happy with the choice as an adult intermediate.  There is much to be said for repeating the same trail a few times when working on improving technique.  Can experiment with skiing the same trail in different ways when a place is not crowded.

post #22 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

Stowe is not a place where you need to worry about getting lost. Pretty much everything empties out to the same spot. Its not like Killington which has a half dozen base areas that don't interconnect. If you're on Mansfield, as long as you're not on Toll Road, everything empties out to the Mansfield parking lots. Pretty simple really.

 

As far as getting bored, not something I'd worry too much about. 

 

 I strongly second freeski919's thoughts. Stowe has to be the easiest to navigate area I've skied at with over 600' of vertical.  If you are on a run you think is too hard for you go to the next trail to your left*. If you're on a trail you think is too easy for you go to the next trail to your right. At the bottom of most trails going left will take you back to the base. Exception one is the gondola, same left harder, right easier but not tied to the runs to their right. Exception two is if you are skiing down toll road and reach the top of a chair that is not running go left immediately or you will wind up at the toll road base. Great if it's open, but a wait for the bus if not. 

 

Early season the woods are usually a bad idea and generally moguls don't get out of hand so stay on the trails and you can't hardly get lost. I can't imagine getting bored in 4 days (OK I skied for 20 years at a place with ~300' and never got bored) But if you do Sugarbush/MRG are an easy drive and Mount Ellen tickets can be a bargain. Jay peak would be roughly the same time but a more convoluted drive. 

 

*lefts and rights when facing downhill

post #23 of 35

Agree that Sugarbush is worth checking out for an intermediate staying at Stowe.  However in this case, the OP is taking advantage of the fact that Stowe was added to the MCP for 2015-16.

 

I wasn't planning on going to Stowe this season but am trying to figure out how to get there since I bought the MCP for trips out west.  Also got a free lift ticket for Sugarbush by attending the Warren Miller film last night.  Hard to pass up 3 days of VT skiing that don't require buying a lift ticket.

post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave W View Post
 

 

 I strongly second freeski919's thoughts. Stowe has to be the easiest to navigate area I've skied at with over 600' of vertical.  If you are on a run you think is too hard for you go to the next trail to your left*. If you're on a trail you think is too easy for you go to the next trail to your right. At the bottom of most trails going left will take you back to the base. Exception one is the gondola, same left harder, right easier but not tied to the runs to their right. Exception two is if you are skiing down toll road and reach the top of a chair that is not running go left immediately or you will wind up at the toll road base. Great if it's open, but a wait for the bus if not. 

 

Early season the woods are usually a bad idea and generally moguls don't get out of hand so stay on the trails and you can't hardly get lost. I can't imagine getting bored in 4 days (OK I skied for 20 years at a place with ~300' and never got bored) But if you do Sugarbush/MRG are an easy drive and Mount Ellen tickets can be a bargain. Jay peak would be roughly the same time but a more convoluted drive. 

 

*lefts and rights when facing downhill

 

You have that backwards...  Stowe gets easier the farther to skier's right you go (at least on the Mansfield / Quad side).

post #25 of 35
nm.

Edited by Whiteroom - 11/16/15 at 8:54pm
post #26 of 35

Sorry

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

 

You have that backwards...  Stowe gets easier the farther to skier's right you go (at least on the Mansfield / Quad side).

Oops, sorry my dyslexia must be kicking in. Thanks for catching that.

post #27 of 35
Thread Starter 

Thanks all for your valuable input.  I have a Stowe trail map and I've already started studying it.  (I don't like reading maps except trail maps:D).  I also called Stowe and learned that they do offer mtn tour and they will take you to trails based on your level.  The forerunner (?) opens at 7:30 a.m. and that's where Toll Road trail is.  But I was told by resort staff that toll road relies on natural snow, it may not open in x'mas time.  If so, I will plan to hit the 1st chair on Mansfield side at 8:30 a.m.   

If I turn out liking Stowe, I may re-visit there during the MLK wknd.  My cousin takes his family to Stowe every year during MLK wknd.  He invites me to join them this coming year... so I will see.  

 

As for Sugarbush, I will visit there the week after MLK wknd.  My friend has a time share in Waitsfield and we will stay 1 week there.  During that week, my friends and I are planning to visit Killington, Pico and MRG also.   (To Marznc: I heard good things about Pico but I did not get a chance to go there last time.  So I will go this Jan.  I heard the best day to ski in Pico is Thursday because it closes on Tues and Weds.to groom the trails.  I hope to meet you in Stowe or Sugarbush.... if not, I guess we can plan to meet in Alta/Snowbird in early April. I will be there from April 2nd to 9th).  

 

To DaveW and KevinF:  to clarify my understanding about easy and hard:

 

If I am on a run you think is too hard, go to the next trail to my RIGHT. If on a trail I think is too easy: go to the next trail to my LEFT. At the bottom of most trails going RIGHT will take me back to the base. Exception one is the gondola, same RIGHT harder, LEFT easier but not tied to the runs to their LEFT. Exception two is toll road, reach the top of a chair that is not running go RIGHT immediately or you will wind up at the toll road base.

 

Is it correct?  

 

post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by fosphenytoin View Post
 

Thanks all for your valuable input.  I have a Stowe trail map and I've already started studying it.  (I don't like reading maps except trail maps:D).  I also called Stowe and learned that they do offer mtn tour and they will take you to trails based on your level.  The forerunner (?) opens at 7:30 a.m. and that's where Toll Road trail is.  But I was told by resort staff that toll road relies on natural snow, it may not open in x'mas time.  If so, I will plan to hit the 1st chair on Mansfield side at 8:30 a.m.   

If I turn out liking Stowe, I may re-visit there during the MLK wknd.  My cousin takes his family to Stowe every year during MLK wknd.  He invites me to join them this coming year... so I will see.  

 

As for Sugarbush, I will visit there the week after MLK wknd.  My friend has a time share in Waitsfield and we will stay 1 week there.  During that week, my friends and I are planning to visit Killington, Pico and MRG also.   (To Marznc: I heard good things about Pico but I did not get a chance to go there last time.  So I will go this Jan.  I heard the best day to ski in Pico is Thursday because it closes on Tues and Weds.to groom the trails.  I hope to meet you in Stowe or Sugarbush.... if not, I guess we can plan to meet in Alta/Snowbird in early April. I will be there from April 2nd to 9th).  

There are advantages to going back to the same place at different times.  Especially when you can go with family or friends.

 

The only possible time for me to ski in VT this season is the last week of Feb.  Much more likely to meet up at Alta in April.  Happy to take a few runs together at Alta.

post #29 of 35
Quote:
To DaveW and KevinF:  to clarify my understanding about easy and hard:

 

If I am on a run you think is too hard, go to the next trail to my RIGHT. If on a trail I think is too easy: go to the next trail to my LEFT.

 

Is it correct?  

 

 

Sorry for my dyslexia I had it backwards, you are correct on that part.

Quote:
At the bottom of most trails going RIGHT will take me back to the base. Exception one is the gondola, same RIGHT harder, LEFT easier but not tied to the runs to their LEFT. Exception two is toll road, reach the top of a chair that is not running go RIGHT immediately or you will wind up at the toll road base. 

This part is still my bad...corrected version is

At the bottom of most trails going LEFT will take me back to the base. Exception one is the gondola, same LEFT harder, RIGHT easier but not tied to the runs to their RIGHT.... Just to add, at the base of the Gondola looking towards the parking lot the Over Easy lift to the spruce base is just to the right, further right is the Fore Runner Quad. (More or less level from Fore Runner to Gondola, it seems uphill both ways.)  Exception two is toll road, reach the top of a chair that is not running go LEFT immediately or you will wind up at the toll road base. Sorry about the confusion I have sown, thank you again KevinF for pointing it out. 

 

What can I say, as well as being a left handed dyslexic, I'm an instructor at Sugarbush and don't ski Stowe as much as I'd like. PM me before your SB trip and I may be able to get discount tickets for you.

post #30 of 35

Fosphenytoin:

 

Stowe is a hotspot of skiing in the East.  If you have never gone, then go for sure.  Yes, there is expert terrain @ Stowe where you really need to know what you are doing.  But, there is lot's of other terrain that's mellow and not so severe.  4 days is nothing @ Stowe.  One thing to think about is maybe try x-country skiing for a day- you can rent gear for the day.  I'm a hack when it comes to x-country skiing, but you might like it.  It can be very cold the end of Dec. but I figure if you are from Penn.,  you'll be prepared for the cold.   Haven't been in there in decades  but The Matterhorn, on the Mt. Rd,  used to be a hotspot right after skiing

 

GO!  Stowe is one of the all-time Classics

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › 4-day ski trip @ Stowe, VT - too long or just right?