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Winterizing basics

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Helllllooo!
Ok bear with me, but I am preparing my car for its first winter!

I have a 2007 Toyota Highlander with 4WD
I will be driving around Colorado, Montana, Canada, and Alaska

My plan of things to get:
Block heater
Oil pan warmer
Changing the oil and antifreeze stuff to the proper temp requirements
Putting on snow tires
Chains

Is that it? Should I do this the week before I drive out there (in Tn) or wait til I'm already in Colorado?
Any others tips and tricks?

Thank you!!!! smile.gif
post #2 of 17

Keep your windshield wiper fluid full, always carry an extra bottle, and make sure its temperature rating is low so it doesn't freeze.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Didn't think of that thanks!!
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Keep your windshield wiper fluid full, always carry an extra bottle, and make sure its temperature rating is low so it doesn't freeze.


By low we mean -40 degrees; the alcohol evaporates quickly on your windshield and the stuff freezes well above the rated temperature.

 

I've always made do with just the block heater, never had the oil pan heater, but I've never had to make an engine outlast my car.  Got about 400,000 km on the last engine/car.

post #5 of 17
Some cardboard or a grill bra to keep your engine operating temperature up.
post #6 of 17

Wiper blades - get new ones, and get the winter ones.  Not a big deal, you just don't want the cantilevered ones with exposed hardware that can freeze in place.

 

Stock up a winter emergency kit.  I'm not going to list all the necessary items, just google it for help.

 

Get a good windshield scraper with a brush.

 

Good one on blocking the airflow to the radiator, Slider.  I use a piece of pond liner from work (80mm HDPE plastic sheet) and use tie wraps to hold it in place on the grill.  It's a lot harder to put on now that I installed a grill guard.  The grill guard was put on in response to all the dang deer on the road.

post #7 of 17

If you are going somewhere that is cold, you should get one of these electric blankets to keep your battery warm too.

4270191.jpg?_v=5a94e708-b43a-47fc-b9d2-56110847a5a6

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

If you are going somewhere that is cold, you should get one of these electric blankets to keep your battery warm too.

4270191.jpg?_v=5a94e708-b43a-47fc-b9d2-56110847a5a6


I'd go with this instead the block heater.  This was all I used back in the days of carburetors, and is way easier to install than a block heater.  You can't start a warm engine with a cold dead battery, but you can sure start a cold engine with a warm battery.  I'd forego the oil pan heater too - it'll probably end up on the road somewhere on the Alcan highway, torn off by a dead raccoon carcass.

post #9 of 17
Block heaters are invaluable but so is a warm battery. Get some gas treatment. A small propane torch is handy too. Don't set your e brake!
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

it'll probably end up on the road somewhere on the Alcan highway, torn off by a dead raccoon carcass.

😂😂😂😂😂😂
post #11 of 17

Don't know about the USA, but most of the gas in Canada already has ethanol in it now, and much of it is "winter" gasoline too.   Gas line antifreeze is a thing of the past 'round here.

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Block heaters are invaluable but so is a warm battery.

I'll just do both. I'd rather do too much and be over zealous than cursing myself later lol
post #13 of 17

I used to do both block heater and battery blanket, then I moved to a warmer climate and put the battery blanket in a "safe" place.  Now I'm back in the cold.  If I ever find that blanket, it's going back on the car.  

post #14 of 17

Keep a small shovel and some old towels and blankets in your truck. We also have some granola bars in the glove box.

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by x10003q View Post
 

Keep a small shovel and some old towels and blankets in your truck. We also have some granola bars in the glove box.


A real shovel, not one of those folding plastic shovels.  Minimum acceptable shovel is aluminum (will bend on ice - steel is better, but how often do you have to shovel ice to get unstuck).

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by alit423 View Post

Helllllooo!
Ok bear with me, but I am preparing my car for its first winter!

I have a 2007 Toyota Highlander with 4WD
I will be driving around Colorado, Montana, Canada, and Alaska

My plan of things to get:
Block heater
Oil pan warmer
Changing the oil and antifreeze stuff to the proper temp requirements
Putting on snow tires
Chains

Is that it? Should I do this the week before I drive out there (in Tn) or wait til I'm already in Colorado?
Any others tips and tricks?

Thank you!!!! smile.gif


Do you already have an big ice scraper?  Can get a long handle brush with ice scraper at the other end in snow country.

 

I also have a standard size brass ice scraper that I actually bought in Durham long ago that works much better than a plastic one.

 

Following the thread because I'm going to be driving my NC minivan up to New England during ski season again this winter.  Good reminders of what I need to pack.  Have stuff but buried somewhere in the garage.

post #17 of 17
There's another thread on winter rv camping with good info.
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