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ski insurance

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

I'll be skiing Verbier last weekend of Jan(from US).  Off-piste patrol evacuation is not covered w/ my lift ticket I assume?  What is this insurance called?  How much does it cost?  Are there different options and companies I could consider? 

 

I've only taken one sled ride in over 40 yrs of skiing, but I guess it is something I have to consider, esp since I'll likely be doing a lot of off-piste on my trip. 

post #2 of 28

I have not been, but EVERYONE I have talked to says hire a guide for at least the first couple of days.  

 

I am a member of the American Alpine Club and it offers insurance.  I am sure there are others, but this will give you a comp.

http://americanalpineclub.org/p/insurance

post #3 of 28

I have used REGA, the Swiss mountain rescue insurance system. http://www.rega.ch/en/start_en.aspx

post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post
 

I have not been, but EVERYONE I have talked to says hire a guide for at least the first couple of days.

Usually when EVERYONE thinks something, they are usually wrong.

"This guide is necessary" business I don't understand, I'm not going to La Grave.  First is cost.  w/o looking it up, i think it's like $150/day to be in a group.  I'm in a group of 4-6 following someone around.  If there is fresh snow, i am likely waiting for people flailing and falling.  I'm one of 4-6, how do I even get a chance to have good talks with the guide about the resort.  Sure, he will take me to special places that I won't find on my own.  But seriously, there are 80 lifts there and it is known for it's off-piste, steeps and moguls.  I am sure I can find plenty of that w/o shelling out a big part of my budget to ski similar steeps well off the beaten track.  And if it hasn't snowed for a few days, oh well, I'll just have to miss out on the hidden powder and I'll catch it next time.  I've skied plenty of powder and I'll get it the next time it comes. 

 

Most of us are on some kind of budget.  I find that many guys don't go on these trips because of cost.  I've been on dozens and dozens of ski trips w/o breaking the family budget, because I always get good ski value for my money.  I will very, very likely have another ski trip later in the winter.  I'm not going to blow $500 for a couple days of guided skiing when I could put that towards another trip.  I'm not pinching pennies but I work hard for my money!

 

I got the same "you need a guide" when I posted my reports on my other two trips to Europe and I certainly didn't!  In St Anton I rode most of the lifts (probably 50) in a couple of days.  I skied every area of the resort, including the White Ring in Lech.  I had no problem, all by myself!  I skied most of Zermatt on my other trip and had a blast.  (although it was not my kind of skiing!).

 

Now there is a possibility that I might joint the Ski Club of Britain and ski with a leader for one day, ($75) my last day, But to start, I'm just going to ride every gondola I can find, scope out some nice steeps on the way up and take my chances.  I have plenty of NA big resort experience and I hope my good mountain sense and skills will keep me safe!  US double blacks are fine, but I will try my best to keep out of the triple blacks!

post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tecumseh View Post
 

I have used REGA, the Swiss mountain rescue insurance system. http://www.rega.ch/en/start_en.aspx

 

It doesn't seem clear to me whether becoming a patron(30CH) entitles me to ski patrol services?  If I become a patron, is that all I have to do??

post #6 of 28

suit yourself so long as you are aware of the European difference between piste and off piste

post #7 of 28

As I recall, REGA employs the term, "patron," for organizational and legal reasons. The money you pay for the insurance is considered something like a "donation" to the organization, presumably to enable REGA to operate as a charitable organization or non-profit society, though that's just my guess. So when you pay the fee you become a patron for a year. They'll send you a card containing various contact numbers, the most important of which is the emergency rescue number, the equivalent of 911. 

 

I've always used REGA for ski mountaineering trips. If you are injured and need a helicopter evacuation or serious first aid, alpine paramedics will come and get you. As I recall, the coverage does extend to ski resorts, and isn't restricted to the high alpine or backcountry. Best to double check that detail, though. Also I seem to recall that the policy (as well as the fee) for international visitors differs from that for Swiss nationals.

 

The REGA  website should give you all the details, plus there is a contact link you can use if you have questions. In my case the response time for answers to questions was quite good, a day or two. 

 

Hope that helps.

post #8 of 28

I just came across a Verbier-specific insurance scheme which might suit you better than REGA. Here's the link: http://www.verbinet.com/ski-insurance

post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

Usually when EVERYONE thinks something, they are usually wrong.

"This guide is necessary" business I don't understand, I'm not going to La Grave.  First is cost.  w/o looking it up, i think it's like $150/day to be in a group.  I'm in a group of 4-6 following someone around.  If there is fresh snow, i am likely waiting for people flailing and falling.  I'm one of 4-6, how do I even get a chance to have good talks with the guide about the resort.  Sure, he will take me to special places that I won't find on my own.  But seriously, there are 80 lifts there and it is known for it's off-piste, steeps and moguls.  I am sure I can find plenty of that w/o shelling out a big part of my budget to ski similar steeps well off the beaten track.  And if it hasn't snowed for a few days, oh well, I'll just have to miss out on the hidden powder and I'll catch it next time.  I've skied plenty of powder and I'll get it the next time it comes. 

 

Most of us are on some kind of budget.  I find that many guys don't go on these trips because of cost.  I've been on dozens and dozens of ski trips w/o breaking the family budget, because I always get good ski value for my money.  I will very, very likely have another ski trip later in the winter.  I'm not going to blow $500 for a couple days of guided skiing when I could put that towards another trip.  I'm not pinching pennies but I work hard for my money!

 

I got the same "you need a guide" when I posted my reports on my other two trips to Europe and I certainly didn't!  In St Anton I rode most of the lifts (probably 50) in a couple of days.  I skied every area of the resort, including the White Ring in Lech.  I had no problem, all by myself!  I skied most of Zermatt on my other trip and had a blast.  (although it was not my kind of skiing!).

 

Now there is a possibility that I might joint the Ski Club of Britain and ski with a leader for one day, ($75) my last day, But to start, I'm just going to ride every gondola I can find, scope out some nice steeps on the way up and take my chances.  I have plenty of NA big resort experience and I hope my good mountain sense and skills will keep me safe!  US double blacks are fine, but I will try my best to keep out of the triple blacks!

 

In a place like St. Anton or Verbier, they wouldn't have you in a group with a bunch of people flailing and falling all over the place. There are too many good skiers in those resorts for that.

 

The "you need a guide" advice is for people who are not used to having terrain within the resort boundaries that has a lot of unmarked hazards and no avalanche control. If you just assume that everything inbounds will be safe, then you can get in a lot of trouble very quickly. If you're willing to stick to terrain that you can see from the lifts, scope out your line from top to bottom to ensure that there aren't any hazards, and take the risk of assessing the avalanche danger yourself, then you probably don't need a guide.

 

But if you do hire a guide, this is the type of stuff they can take you to.

 

post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tecumseh View Post
 

I just came across a Verbier-specific insurance scheme which might suit you better than REGA. Here's the link: http://www.verbinet.com/ski-insurance

Thanks.  This is confusing.  They list three type of insurance.

EHIC card - I think? that is for Europeans

Off-Piste Insurance Card - this is probably what I need, but it gives an example of no coverage for avalanche rescue or body retrieval if no avalanche reciever

Carré / Carte Neige Insurance - Euro residents.

 

maybe I need Rega + Off-Piste Insurance Card?

post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

Thanks.  This is confusing.  They list three type of insurance.

EHIC card - I think? that is for Europeans

Off-Piste Insurance Card - this is probably what I need, but it gives an example of no coverage for avalanche rescue or body retrieval if no avalanche reciever

Carré / Carte Neige Insurance - Euro residents.

 

maybe I need Rega + Off-Piste Insurance Card?

No idea about the specifics for Verbier & REGA insurance

 

But EHIC is the reciprocal EU resident healthcare card

Carre/Carte Neige is insurance offered with the lift pass (Carte is seasonal, Carre is with the pass).

 

In Verbier it looks like this is a=called Snow assist and available at an extra 5 CHF a day

 

http://en.verbier.ch/seedo/winter/prices#PricesandInsurance

 

Many people buy the pass insurance even if they are already covered by other insurance because it makes it really easy for pisteurs to validate your coverage before they sled you or call in a heli.  

 

EDIT:  Just had a look at the Snow Assist - seems a bit ambiguous if you are off a marked run - this is par for the course with general travel insurance products in Europe and may mean you are better topping up with a climbing style policy.


Edited by fatbob - 11/9/15 at 7:12am
post #12 of 28

Probably best to get clarification from the horse's mouth (i.e., contact Verbier and/or REGA directly to see just what you need). I was under the (perhaps mistaken) impression that Carte Neige was only available/relevant at French ski resorts, principally because I haven't noticed it mentioned in connection with skiing in Switzerland, until now.

post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

Usually when EVERYONE thinks something, they are usually wrong.

"This guide is necessary" business I don't understand, I'm not going to La Grave.  

 

I got the same "you need a guide" when I posted my reports on my other two trips to Europe and I certainly didn't!  In St Anton I rode most of the lifts (probably 50) in a couple of days.  I skied every area of the resort, including the White Ring in Lech.  I had no problem, all by myself!  I skied most of Zermatt on my other trip and had a blast.  (although it was not my kind of skiing!).

 

Now there is a possibility that I might joint the Ski Club of Britain and ski with a leader for one day, ($75) my last day, But to start, I'm just going to ride every gondola I can find, scope out some nice steeps on the way up and take my chances.  I have plenty of NA big resort experience and I hope my good mountain sense and skills will keep me safe!  US double blacks are fine, but I will try my best to keep out of the triple blacks!

 

I symphathise but I think the "best" advice to any N American skier looking to ski off-piste in Europe remains "you need a guide" until they can articulate why they don't.  Then if you can explain that you have Avy kit, outside the gates experience, topo maps  and a solid crew then I'd say have at it BUT be very careful with glaciers.  It's the same advice as for any Euro skier looking to go off piste, there is lots of safe stuff out there but until you know why and when it's safe, don't take any random assurances from people on tinterweb.  Every year there are incidents really near to pistes and people having horrible experiences by virtue of taking what they thought was a "shortcut".

post #14 of 28
It's the hidden crevasse thing that worries me the most.

The video was a snore until about three minutes in, then the guide idea got more interesting.

I realize that we've got it good here, being able to go where we like because ski patrol is on the job.
post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 

I hate to be argumentative about this "guide is necessary" but I guess I am.

I just have no idea why it is assumed that with 80 lifts I can't find some nice black trails and moguls run to ski by myself.

Avalanche danger - I'll worry about that if there is fresh snow.  My last two trips to Europe had zilch danger, there was no recent snow and it was all skied out.

But, If there is powder to be had, I think $150/day extra to go with a guide and ski powder all day would be well worth it.

Crevasse danger - please correct me if I'm wrong, I know there is a glacier at the top of Mont Forte, but besides that are crevasse's a danger there?  I'm pretty sure on another thread someone said they are not at Verbier.  I'll find out for sure. 

Cliff's etc - I'll just have to use my ski sense to scope out routes prior to wondering off.  I am sure there is gravity to be had w/o taking unnecessary chances even though it is labeled off-piste. 

A guided day - now i am reading that most of these guided trips go on the fringes of the resort.  So I spend 2 hrs going off the back of Mt Forte and what good does that do me in learning the resort???  If there is a crevasse danger to worry about - I am not going to take a chance in finding my way through by myself the next day.  What good in learning the resort does it do me to go off the beaten path for say 1/2 of the guided day, when I might not trust myself to take the exact same route again.

Avalanche - google verbier avalanche deaths - and what you will find is that the guided skiers also were buried in avalanches!!!  It is likely that if there is fresh snow, my chances of burial are higher going w/ a guide rather than carefully selecting well skied pitches on my own.  Even so, it is a chance we take.  A skier was buried at Snowbird a few years ago in bounds - on a run I've very likely been on.  I'm experienced enough to know what a measured risk is while skiing. 

There are likely going to be a couple ten thousand people skiing the resort the days I am there.  It's silly to think they all need guided experience of that resort to enjoy their day. 

That's why I'm going to Verbier - hopefully the good are there w/o having to wander too far off the beaten path, or so i read!

post #16 of 28

Like I said suit yourself.  And also as I said I have never been so my advice is the ultimate nth degree internet babble.  The Americans and Europeans I have talked with have all told me to hire a guide. There are reasons beyond safety to hire a guide.

post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

It's the hidden crevasse thing that worries me the most.

The video was a snore until about three minutes in, then the guide idea got more interesting.

I realize that we've got it good here, being able to go where we like because ski patrol is on the job.

 

Unseen cliffs and gullies are the bigger dangers in most places. European resorts have no qualms about building easy groomers around or above hazards like that. And usually, there aren't any markers. So if you just jump into a line without scoping it out from a lift or elsewhere, then you can easily find yourself on top of something that could cause a lot of pain. Crevasses are only a danger in the few places with glaciers.

 

The first three minutes of the video are on the small, scraped out area at the top of the lift that everyone has to ski down. The snow is rarely good enough in that spot for having fun just because of the amount of traffic. But once you go down a little way, it gets much more interesting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
 

I hate to be argumentative about this "guide is necessary" but I guess I am.

I just have no idea why it is assumed that with 80 lifts I can't find some nice black trails and moguls run to ski by myself.

Avalanche danger - I'll worry about that if there is fresh snow.  My last two trips to Europe had zilch danger, there was no recent snow and it was all skied out.

But, If there is powder to be had, I think $150/day extra to go with a guide and ski powder all day would be well worth it.

Crevasse danger - please correct me if I'm wrong, I know there is a glacier at the top of Mont Forte, but besides that are crevasse's a danger there?  I'm pretty sure on another thread someone said they are not at Verbier.  I'll find out for sure. 

Cliff's etc - I'll just have to use my ski sense to scope out routes prior to wondering off.  I am sure there is gravity to be had w/o taking unnecessary chances even though it is labeled off-piste. 

A guided day - now i am reading that most of these guided trips go on the fringes of the resort.  So I spend 2 hrs going off the back of Mt Forte and what good does that do me in learning the resort???  If there is a crevasse danger to worry about - I am not going to take a chance in finding my way through by myself the next day.  What good in learning the resort does it do me to go off the beaten path for say 1/2 of the guided day, when I might not trust myself to take the exact same route again.

Avalanche - google verbier avalanche deaths - and what you will find is that the guided skiers also were buried in avalanches!!!  It is likely that if there is fresh snow, my chances of burial are higher going w/ a guide rather than carefully selecting well skied pitches on my own.  Even so, it is a chance we take.  A skier was buried at Snowbird a few years ago in bounds - on a run I've very likely been on.  I'm experienced enough to know what a measured risk is while skiing. 

There are likely going to be a couple ten thousand people skiing the resort the days I am there.  It's silly to think they all need guided experience of that resort to enjoy their day. 

That's why I'm going to Verbier - hopefully the good are there w/o having to wander too far off the beaten path, or so i read!

 

The recommendation for a guide is for people skiing off piste. If all you want to do is cruise around the area, then you don't need a guide for that. The problem you might run into is that there probably won't be a lot of terrain that you like that is controlled, since European resorts like to groom so much stuff. So once you take some runs down the marked ski routes off Mont Forte, then you'll face the choice of cruising groomers or going off piste. 

 

Anyways, when you're weighing up the dangers of skiing off piste in Europe, you also have to consider incidents like the US ski team guys who died last year. They hopped on a face that was just off to the side of one piste and within sight of one or two others, but they still set off a slide big enough to kill them. It didn't help that they didn't have any beacons, which slowed down the search.

 

It's like my brother likes to say: the Alps can kill you in a hurry.

post #18 of 28

The EHIC gives access to the state-provided healthcare in Switzerland at a reduced cost and will cover your treatment until you return to the UK. It will not cover your evacuation costs from the mountain to the hospital. Not applicable if you are a US / Canadian citizen.

 

 

Now I was going to recommend getting Carre Neige which is a French based daily insurance for rescue off the mountain to the hospital which is valid in Switzerland at most resorts but I am not sure if it is available to non EU citizens.

 

Does anyone have info on this.?

 

If Carre Neige is OK for US citizens then I would go with that. 

post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 

Just an update on my trip.  No longer solo, my best ski bro is coming along and good chance #2 also.  So the plan is - when in doubt - let them go first!!

post #20 of 28

For me, the advantage of taking a guide (beyond the obvious and all important issue of safety) is that you will be sure to get to the best snow and slopes.  You can eyeball slopes from the lifts, you can follow tracks into off piste areas, you can ask around, and odds are that you will find some good off piste skiing and have a great time.    I've had a great time skiing at a lot of Euro resorts just by following my nose and being aware of my surroundings.  Then I've skied those same resorts with a guide and found out what I had been missing.  I understand the value play but I'd contend that if you haven't gone with a guide, that you do it once and then evaluate whether it holds enough value for you when you put the experience up against the cost.  It's a long way to travel and you're only out on the hill for a relatively short time.  I find that the value is in getting the most out of the experience.  I've wasted a lot of ski time going to the wrong lift or wrong exposure at the wrong time of day.  There's no question that skiing with a guide is a better skiing experience.  It's up to you to determine if that experience is worth the extra money to you. 

post #21 of 28
Quote:
I'm in a group of 4-6 following someone around.  If there is fresh snow, i am likely waiting for people flailing and falling.  I'm one of 4-6, how do I even get a chance to have good talks with the guide about the resort. 

This is a non-issue IMHO.  When I was with Piste-to-Powder in St. Anton they separate groups into 4 ability ranges and all 3 days I was with very compatible groups of 4-5 people.  No different than heliskiing in an A-Star.

Quote:
In St Anton I rode most of the lifts (probably 50) in a couple of days.  I skied every area of the resort, including the White Ring in Lech. 

The White Ring is a long series of marked groomed runs.   That video off the north side of the Valluga?  You're not even allowed up there without a guide, and that was clearly the highlight run of my week in the Arlberg.

Quote:
I skied most of Zermatt on my other trip and had a blast.  (although it was not my kind of skiing!).

No you didn't because it was in December and only a limited number of pistes were open and zero off-piste.  Zermatt in Feb. 2014 was my most impressive Euro trip and it was a quite different experience than you described.

 

Quote:

I hate to be argumentative about this "guide is necessary" but I guess I am.

I just have no idea why it is assumed that with 80 lifts I can't find some nice black trails and moguls run to ski by myself.

You can, but I'll bet groomed blacks and moguls aren't what you like best about Snowbird.

Quote:

Avalanche danger - I'll worry about that if there is fresh snow.  My last two trips to Europe had zilch danger, there was no recent snow and it was all skied out.

But, If there is powder to be had, I think $150/day extra to go with a guide and ski powder all day would be well worth it.

You get far enough off-piste and there will likely be some powder several days after a storm.  And your late January time frame is ideal in terms of multiple day powder preservation.  That should be one of the reasons you're going to the Alps in the first place.  Wide open powder slopes are not all hammered in the first 2 hours like they are most places in North America.

Quote:
Crevasse danger - please correct me if I'm wrong, I know there is a glacier at the top of Mont Forte, but besides that are crevasse's a danger there?  I'm pretty sure on another thread someone said they are not at Verbier.  I'll find out for sure.

I only had one day at Verbier but I think you're right about the crevasses.  At Chamonix and Zermatt I was guided in places where there were crevasses, including this one we skied inside!

 

Quote:
Cliff's etc - I'll just have to use my ski sense to scope out routes prior to wondering off.  I am sure there is gravity to be had w/o taking unnecessary chances even though it is labeled off-piste. 

When off piste ski routes are miles and thousands of vertical feet long you often have no clue at the top whether you're skiing into a potential terrain trap.  Sort of like Granite Canyon at Jackson Hole.  I'd love to ski that, but I'm not going to unless I'm guided by a local who has been there before. On your own you have to be sensible and only ski where you can see that you have a safe exit.

Quote:
A guided day - now i am reading that most of these guided trips go on the fringes of the resort.  So I spend 2 hrs going off the back of Mt Forte and what good does that do me in learning the resort???  If there is a crevasse danger to worry about - I am not going to take a chance in finding my way through by myself the next day.  What good in learning the resort does it do me to go off the beaten path for say 1/2 of the guided day, when I might not trust myself to take the exact same route again.

These are unique ski experiences that you won't get anywhere else.  Some in the Arlberg I would do on my own with friends now that I have seen them, the ones with glacial features Chamonix/La Grave/Zermatt definitely not.

Quote:
There are likely going to be a couple ten thousand people skiing the resort the days I am there.  It's silly to think they all need guided experience of that resort to enjoy their day. 

Yes, and 95+% of those people stay on the pistes.  You and I go to the Alps precisely because we want to be part of the other 5%.

Quote:
That's why I'm going to Verbier - hopefully the goods are there w/o having to wander too far off the beaten path, or so i read!

Actually I have some sympathy with SnowbirdDevotee's premise. I think you need to research and pick your spots in terms of when you're getting the most value from being guided.  It varies a lot by resort IMHO.  My experience has been as follows:

 

La Grave:  Here you need to be guided all the time unless you're content to ski the one run under the lift all day.

 

Chamonix: This was my first Euro trip.  It was a press trip with guides every day. Guides are required on Vallee Blanche.  Grands Montets I could have done OK on my own but did get to ski that crevasse run with the guides.  Guides are probably not needed at the smaller places (Le Tour, Brevant-Flegere, etc).

 

St. Anton/Lech/Zurs/Stuben:  I hired Piste-to-Powder for 3 of my 6 days there.  As noted above guides are required for top of the Valluga.  The other places I skied with guides were far enough off-piste that I would never have found them on my own.  And there was not that much new snow, so those far off places were where the powder was.

 

Davos (3 days after the week in the Arlberg):  Here I did it SnowbirdDevotee's way, and the last day on Parsenn was a nice powder day.  But Parsenn is mostly intermediate terrain and much of the powder was close by the pistes.  Two days at Flims-Laax (also very intermediate but minimal new snow) were also unguided.

 

Zermatt:  Liz and I had one guided day for the trek to and ski down the Schwarze Glacier.  I did a lot of research about Zermatt before the trip.  Within Zermatt there seemed to be vast terrain, notably off the 3,450 vertical Hohtalli tram, which could be visually scouted as SnowbirdDevotee envisions.  Since it snowed 3x during our week the powder was there for the taking and not a long trek away as on the Arlberg trip.

 

On the Chamonix trip we had a daytrip to Verbier: http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=5551

We were guided until lunch.  After lunch I went up the Mont Gele tram on my own for another impressive run. 

 

The rules of thumb IMHO:

1) The more expert terrain reputation, the more likely you should be guided at least some of the time to get the most out of what the resort has to offer.

2) The less intense research you do in advance, the more likely you should hire a guide to speed up the learning curve.

Due to #1 above, I would advise SnowbirdDevotee at Verbier to reserve a guide for one day early in the trip, see how it goes and decide whether you want more.   


Edited by Tony Crocker - 12/3/15 at 12:46pm
post #22 of 28

Did you guys settle this yet? I read all the posts, but frankly, I only skimmed through, too much rhetoric, pictures and video were nice though :)  I got one question for the OP, and it's a serious Q, not a troll. I'm just curious.

 

 If you're skiing off piste in the Alps alone, why do you need rescue insurance? If you're face down in a crevasse, dead, and they find you in the spring, will they charge the cost of recovering your body to your estate at that point?  Are you banking on cell phone coverage if you are down, but still alive?

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCRUFFY View Post
 

Did you guys settle this yet? I read all the posts, but frankly, I only skimmed through, too much rhetoric, pictures and video were nice though :)  I got one question for the OP, and it's a serious Q, not a troll. I'm just curious.

 

 If you're skiing off piste in the Alps alone, why do you need rescue insurance? If you're face down in a crevasse, dead, and they find you in the spring, will they charge the cost of recovering your body to your estate at that point?  Are you banking on cell phone coverage if you are down, but still alive?

If you're in a crevasse it might be 100s of years before you're flushed out of the glacier snout. But falling is a crevasse is only one problem - there are lots of places you can get to easily where you can get hurt but be in cellphone range or indeed get a fair amount of passing traffic but would be pretty difficulty to run a patrol sled from.

post #24 of 28
Was this insurance question ever settled?
Info here is pretty vague for Switzerland.
post #25 of 28
Get the snow assist added on a lift ticket because it's cheap and gets you free ski patrol rescue at least. It's not something I've ever looked into in detail because I have an annual travel insurance policy that should reimburse for off piste accidents.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post

Get the snow assist added on a lift ticket because it's cheap and gets you free ski patrol rescue at least. It's not something I've ever looked into in detail because I have an annual travel insurance policy that should reimburse for off piste accidents.
Thanks. Sounds like the basic.
The confusing thing is Air-Glaciers or Rega. Appears that the former reimburses or will do the helicopter themselves.
Rescue Card- Carte de Sauvetage:
http://www.air-glaciers.ch/sion/images/pdf/charte_ang_0216.pdf
Rega Patron:
https://www.rega.ch/en/support-rega/become-a-rega-patron.aspx
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post

Get the snow assist added on a lift ticket because it's cheap and gets you free ski patrol rescue at least. It's not something I've ever looked into in detail because I have an annual travel insurance policy that should reimburse for off piste accidents.
Thanks. Sounds like the basic.
The confusing thing is Air-Glaciers or Rega. Appears that the former reimburses or will do the helicopter themselves.
Rescue Card- Carte de Sauvetage:
http://www.air-glaciers.ch/sion/images/pdf/charte_ang_0216.pdf
Rega Patron:
https://www.rega.ch/en/support-rega/become-a-rega-patron.aspx

Air-Glaciers and Rega Patron appear to be standard helicopter medical evacuation and repatriation I have purchased in the past from International SOS when working in a developing country. It's a way to reach a medical facility of the standard a Westerner is accustomed to quickly. The lift ticket add-on offers ski patrol search and rescue, based on my limited one day Chamonix experience. Two are complementary, not duplicative services. @fatbob and others, do you agree?
post #28 of 28
I think so. Like I said I've never looked into the help evac cards myself but I would guess it's like the Tahoe lifeflight thing you can buy a membership to. If Ski patrol/SAR determine you need a heli you'll get one I think but if your insurance doesn't automatically cover it it this thread seems to indicate you might get a billhttp://www.englishforum.ch/insurance/155820-mountain-evacuation-via-helicopter-insurance-2.html.

France outside resort boundaries I e. Where you are in SAR scope rather than patrol, heli rescue by PGHM is free but in resort you pay or have carte neige.

In Austria my experience is that patrol will regularly call helis even for on piste leg injuries.
Edited by fatbob - 2/13/16 at 3:21pm
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