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New boots and binding question

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I'm relatively new to skiing, and had inexpensive boots last year. This year I decided to buy good boots, and have a question about the size of the boot and the bindings on my skis.The new boots are 5 mm longer than the old boots. Do I need to take my skis into the shop to have the bindings adjusted? My level of skiing has not changed so my din setting would be the same. If I need to adjust the bindings, is this something that I can easily do on my own?
post #2 of 22

Yes.  You should have a reputable shop adjust your bindings for Length and Forward Pressure.  Unless you are pretty experienced, NO I would NOT do this myself.  

 

New boots are like an arranged marriage.  You hardly know each other.  Things will be uncomfortable at first.  There will be some pain and tears, but be patient and work with them.  You will grow to love each other.  

 

Enjoy.

post #3 of 22

Yes, without a doubt. Bring them to a reputable shop. If you don't have the knowledge and practical experience, it is best left to the shop guys.

post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by edicus View Post

I'm relatively new to skiing, and had inexpensive boots last year. This year I decided to buy good boots, and have a question about the size of the boot and the bindings on my skis.The new boots are 5 mm longer than the old boots. Do I need to take my skis into the shop to have the bindings adjusted? My level of skiing has not changed so my din setting would be the same. If I need to adjust the bindings, is this something that I can easily do on my own?

I highlighted the interesting sentence.

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

click on the above address and read through how to "shell check" a boot, to see if it is the right size for you, then check your new boots, just for the fun of it.

 

Happy skiing

 

mike
 

post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by edicus View Post

I'm relatively new to skiing, and had inexpensive boots last year. This year I decided to buy good boots, and have a question about the size of the boot and the bindings on my skis.The new boots are 5 mm longer than the old boots. Do I need to take my skis into the shop to have the bindings adjusted? My level of skiing has not changed so my din setting would be the same. If I need to adjust the bindings, is this something that I can easily do on my own?


How you are planning on finding the new boots?  Usually when you buy new boots from a shop with a good boot fitter, they will make any minor adjustments to the bindings for free.  If you are asking how to adjust bindings, much safer to let a qualified tech do it.  Bindings are important safety devices, not just a way to keep boots attached to skis.

post #6 of 22
Yeah, that was my first reaction as well. LONGER? Red flag.
Quote:
Originally Posted by miketsc View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by edicus View Post

I'm relatively new to skiing, and had inexpensive boots last year. This year I decided to buy good boots, and have a question about the size of the boot and the bindings on my skis.The new boots are 5 mm longer than the old boots. Do I need to take my skis into the shop to have the bindings adjusted? My level of skiing has not changed so my din setting would be the same. If I need to adjust the bindings, is this something that I can easily do on my own?
I highlighted the interesting sentence.

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me



click on the above address and read through how to "shell check" a boot, to see if it is the right size for you, then check your new boots, just for the fun of it.

Happy skiing

mike

 
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. My question about boot size was regarding the length to fit in the binding, not for size. I went to a ski shop and was fitted and bought boots.

Today I took boots and skis to ski shop for proper binding settings.
post #8 of 22
Quote:
 I went to a ski shop and was fitted and bought boots.

That does not mean that the boots are the right size for you.  We don't know how well the store clerk was trained.  It is an easier sell for boots that are too big.  My rule of thumb--if the new boots don't hurt in a few spots they are too wide, maybe too long, maybe both.  You want the boots as small as possible.  The bootfitter at the shop will then heat and press out spots where the boots press on the lumps and bumps we all have on our feet.  Scroll down to the Punching and Grinding video:  http://lous.ca/services/

 

So, do check the shell fit as Mike suggests.  Your new boots might need to be returned for a snugger size.

 

All that said, different brands of boots may have a longer sole for the same internal size.  All bindings have a range of length adjustments.  Some are easy with a screwdriver, but you need to know what to look for on the forward pressure indicator.  Some don't even require a tool, but again, the forward pressure indicator must have the right reading.  The shop that made a nice profit on those boots should do this for free--it takes a slow worker 2 minutes.

post #9 of 22

Hmm... Goes to profile to check location. Nothing.

 

You from the US of A?

 

Well then you should bring them to a certified dealer, have them adjusted and tourqe tested and remember to sign the waiver. 

 

Am I the only one who thinks it's a bit scary with all the people out there not able to check the forward pressure on their own bindings? They should have provided user manual for those things but I guess the "legal enviroment" in some countries prevent that from happening. Google tech manual and the binding brand and you might find something.

post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
The guy at the store had me wear them for 15-20 minutes and lean forward in skiing position. They are Salamon xpro 90. They are a bit snug-if I didn't know about ski boot sizing I'd say they are too small, but not TOO small. They felt good after 20 minutes.

Where I bought them is not from my neighborhood ski shop so can't have boot seller adjust binding. My ski shop checks binding for proper release afte making adjutments.
post #11 of 22

edicus, it is very important to do a shell size check before you ski in them...in case...you need to get a smaller boot.  No returning them after skiing in them and there is no practical way to fix a boot that is too big.

 

Did the salesperson who fit your boots take the liners out and have you slip your foot into the shell and measure space behind the heel with toe touching end? If not...TAKE THE BOOTS BACK AND GO TO A BETTER BOOT FITTER.

 

Almost nobody gets a LARGER boot when getting new boots, that is why we are unanimously concerned.

post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
My shoe size is 10 which equates to mondo 28, and the boots are 27.5
post #13 of 22
God forbid you should actually do this shell check...


Here, peruse this: http://www.epicski.com/t/93737/what-is-your-boot-size-mondo-bsl-relative-to-your-street-shoe-sneaker-size-us-currently-indicate-shell-fit-measurements-if-you-know


You'll notice that there are some people that got your size boots and some who got even smaller. Don't assume that because someone posted their size that their boots are right, either. I bet there are none in too small a boot, though, because they wouldn't be able to ski. Some would say the same about the boots that are too large.
post #14 of 22
.......
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
I'm not saying I won't so the shell check. Boots are at shop right now with skis for binding set.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by edicus View Post

My shoe size is 10 which equates to mondo 28, and the boots are 27.5

Bingo.  The guy who owns the shop where I work part time wears a size 9-1/2 shoe, his boots are 26.5 and he is a boot fitter.  Shoe size is not how you determine what size boot you need.  Shoes are always too long.  Did they even measure your feet or just ask what size shoe you wear?  If they didn't measure your feet, take the boots back, they are too big.

post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

Bingo.  The guy who owns the shop where I work part time wears a size 9-1/2 shoe, his boots are 26.5 and he is a boot fitter.  Shoe size is not how you determine what size boot you need.  Shoes are always too long.  Did they even measure your feet or just ask what size shoe you wear?  If they didn't measure your feet, take the boots back, they are too big.

Dude, the example you gave is the EXACT same drop from street shoe -> ski boot as the OP.  Chill out and let him check his boots when he has them back in his hands. 

 

 

( I mean, I agree they almost certainly could be smaller. But because they could be fit smaller, doesn't automatically mean they should be smaller. There are folks out there that don't get to ski a lot, they might want their boots to be comfortable for the 5 to 10 days they get to ski per year, instead of spending every day on snow dealing with fit issues that need to be addressed by the bootfitter. We are not all alike in our wants and needs from ski boot fit.)

post #18 of 22

Maybe the guy is so good that he could tell by looking at feet what size they were.  I'm a US 11 in my Danner hiking boots, but usually wear a 10 or 10.5 in shoe size in Canada (who knows if it's US or UK sizing :confused).  My comfy boots are 27.5.

post #19 of 22
Shop should do for free! Did your feet grow since your old boots? Where your old boots too small? Did you buy a really different type of boot? If not check the shell fit. A lot of shops put people into boots that are too big!
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by edicus View Post

My shoe size is 10 which equates to mondo 28, and the boots are 27.5
My shoe size is 10 and wear a 26.5 in a Lange XT (97mm) . I did not rely on a chart.
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Yeah, that was my first reaction as well. LONGER? Red flag.


That does depend on the fit.  I have some 315 bsl length boots that fit really snug and when I bought some softer boots for bc applications, they were 317.  Man, did 2 mm make a world of difference in comfort.  Well and the boot is likely a bit more comfortable too.  But to the OP's question, for 2mm I had to adjust my bindings to have the correct forward pressure.

post #22 of 22

Quote:

Originally Posted by FatChance View Post


My shoe size is 10 and wear a 26.5 in a Lange XT (97mm) . I did not rely on a chart.

This sounds about right to me, as I wear a 10.5 length shoe and usually have a 27.0 shell.

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