or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Advice on Ski Size for Tall/Thin Guy
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Advice on Ski Size for Tall/Thin Guy

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Getting back into skiing after snowboarding for the past few years.

 

Height: 6' 1"

Weight: 165/170

Skiing Style: Aggressive

Terrain: Mix (going out to Big Sky this January, but mostly ski on the East Coast)

 

I'm deciding between the Blizzard Brahmas and Armada TSTs. Would welcome other suggestions.

 

But my main concern is, what size? I'm thinking something in the 180-185 range but would like to hear some advice.

post #2 of 8
For the brahma go with the 180 size, the 187 will be too long. No experience with the armada
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlrsn View Post

Getting back into skiing after snowboarding for the past few years.

Height: 6' 1"
Weight: 165/170
Skiing Style: Aggressive
Terrain: Mix (going out to Big Sky this January, but mostly ski on the East Coast)

I'm deciding between the Blizzard Brahmas and Armada TSTs. Would welcome other suggestions.

But my main concern is, what size? I'm thinking something in the 180-185 range but would like to hear some advice.

Those two skis are kind of apples and oranges. If you are looking at a do it all ski primarily for the east, the Brahma is a better choice. Or one of its many peers. The TST is more of a playful, agile, soft snow ski.
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

What would you say a

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


Those two skis are kind of apples and oranges. If you are looking at a do it all ski primarily for the east, the Brahma is a better choice. Or one of its many peers. The TST is more of a playful, agile, soft snow ski.

What skis would you say are comparable to the Brahmas?

post #5 of 8

Buy a ski for where you mostly ski and rent a ski if needed when you travel.  That means you should buy a ski with a hard snow bias and either take it with you when you travel or just rent when you travel.  You say you're an aggressive skier but that says nothing about the terrain you ski.  On piste only to off piste only, where do you fit on that spectrum?  It makes a big difference.  If you never ski off-piste, why get a ~90mm ski when a 80-85mm will serve you better?  So tell us  about the terrain you ski and we can offer some suggestions.

 

Also tell us about your boots, because we are mostly obsessed with folks having boots that actually fit their feet instead of someone else's feet.  And that usually means you need to get them from a good bootfitter, not just some minimum wage clerk in a big box sporting goods store who may not even ski.  And ski boots don't fit like snowboard boots.

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

Buy a ski for where you mostly ski and rent a ski if needed when you travel.  That means you should buy a ski with a hard snow bias and either take it with you when you travel or just rent when you travel.  You say you're an aggressive skier but that says nothing about the terrain you ski.  On piste only to off piste only, where do you fit on that spectrum?  It makes a big difference.  If you never ski off-piste, why get a ~90mm ski when a 80-85mm will serve you better?  So tell us  about the terrain you ski and we can offer some suggestions.

 

Also tell us about your boots, because we are mostly obsessed with folks having boots that actually fit their feet instead of someone else's feet.  And that usually means you need to get them from a good bootfitter, not just some minimum wage clerk in a big box sporting goods store who may not even ski.  And ski boots don't fit like snowboard boots.

 

It's honestly a mix. I take at least 2 week-long trips out West (Colorado, Utah, Montana, Whistler, etc.) per year. On these trips, I prefer to go off-piste. I live on the East Coast though, so I also take a lot of day trips (8-10 per year) to Vermont & New Hampshire (so, obviously a lot of groomed trails, although I do tend to venture into glades as much as possible). On the overall spectrum, then, I would say I lean more towards off-piste.

 

Don't have boots yet, but I certainly won't be going to Dick's or anything of the sort for them. I'll find a good bootfitter in my area.

 

Thanks for the advice.

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlrsn View Post

 

It's honestly a mix. I take at least 2 week-long trips out West (Colorado, Utah, Montana, Whistler, etc.) per year. On these trips, I prefer to go off-piste. I live on the East Coast though, so I also take a lot of day trips (8-10 per year) to Vermont & New Hampshire (so, obviously a lot of groomed trails, although I do tend to venture into glades as much as possible). On the overall spectrum, then, I would say I lean more towards off-piste.

 

Then you probably want something around 90-95mm that has good edge grip for those extra hard eastern days.  Skis that come to mind are the Atomic Vantage 90CTi, Blizzard Brahma, Fischer Motive 95, Elan Amphibio 88XTi.  You could even go as wide as 100mm;  Nordica Enforcer, Vantage 100CTi.  Any of these skis will do what you want for most of your skiing.  None of them will be great in really deep stuff so you want to rent some really fat skis if you get the chance to ski deep.

 

Quote:

Don't have boots yet, but I certainly won't be going to Dick's or anything of the sort for them. I'll find a good bootfitter in my area.

Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read through the wikis about fitting and terminology so you have a basic understanding of how the fitting process should go.  Then check the "Who's Who" to see if there is a fitter listed near you.  If there is, call and make an appointment.  If not, ask here and someone will be able to recommend a skilled fitter.  Not all ski shops have good fitters.  If someone asks what your shoe size is, that isn't a good sign.  Ski boots should not fit like shoes.

post #8 of 8

tlrsn, how did you feel on your demo run on the Brahmas?

 

You didn't demo?  That's like buying a car from a catalog.  Worse.  Buying a dog from a catalog.  The cheapest thing you can do when shopping for skis is the demo.  Buying the skis that put the biggest smile on your face means that it'll be a long time until you buy more.  Also you can demo the length as well as the model.  You'll find huge differences in the feel of equally high quality skis of the same genre.  The one you really like might not be my favorite, and that's OK.

 

How much energy do you put into the skis?  How much energy do the skis need put into them for their best performance?  Skis are made stiffer as they're made longer.  The longest/stiffest size in any ski line is made for the biggest, strongest guy on the mountain.  That isn't me nor you at 165#.  If the skis are too soft they'll be like skiing on noodles.  If they're too stiff they'll be like skiing on 2x4s.  If they are right for your skiing energy input, they'll do their best for you.  My rule of thumb, for my weight, ability, style, and energy level is to buy one size less than the max in each line.  My carvers are 170, my mid-fats are 177, and my fatties are 180.  Each responds just right for me.  With your weight, you may put less energy into the ski than I do, and perhaps two sizes down from the longest/stiffest will give you the best response.

 

Buy boots that are just right for you.  Boots are our most important piece of gear.  Hand carry them on a plane; you can buy or rent anything else if the airline loses it.  Here are six great videos mainly about boots:  http://lous.ca/

 

What type of ski is the best where you usually ski?  Why 88 mm?  Would a narrower ski be better on the harder snow in the East?  Then, if there is fresh snow on your western trip, rent.  Or buy something suitable on eBay this year, and demo on a powder day for a Spring purchase at a close out price.  There is no one ski that will be great on typical snow in both regions.  There is no one ski that will be great everyday in the West (where I've skied for 40 years).  I grab my 76s or 85s or 95s depending on the day's conditions, or take two pair on a trip to an out of town western mountain.  If I could count the days I've skied on hard pack in B.C. and Colorado, and Montana, and Wyoming, and Utah...it's plenty.  And the day's I've had thin new snow.  Or wet heavy snow.  Or deep fluffy powder.  One ski for everything is like playing golf with one club.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Advice on Ski Size for Tall/Thin Guy