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Is Jack Taylor the paradigm?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

The title of this thread should read "Is Jack Taylor the paradigm?" My cat thought my mouse was a real mouse and pawed it, which posted the thread before I corrected the title.

 

Cassedy doing some old-school bump skiing where she has to "work the legs" to bring her skis around. It was hard to be good back in her day. Newfangled skis have changed mogul mechanics by enabling skiers to bring skis around much more easily. New school mogul skiing reminds me of the "tip turning" that I did on groomers in 1975 when I was showing off. I would slide the back of my skis back and forth as fast as I could. Twin tip heaven. IMHO paradigm mogul mechanics are halfway between Jack Taylor and Nelson Carmichael.

 

 


Edited by OldSchool47 - 11/5/15 at 11:50am
post #2 of 7

It's difficult to compare old to new partially due to seeded bumps versus natural, but the thing that really makes the new school look more smooth and less erratic is using shorter poles in the bumps.  Us old schoolers have a lot of wild pole flicks even when trying to keep our hands out front due to having to plant on the backside near the top of the bumps higher than we would skiing on groomed or powder.  Using poles in the bumps about a foot shorter than we use on groomed or other non bumped/rutted terrain eliminates that excess arm motion.

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

It's difficult to compare old to new partially due to seeded bumps versus natural, but the thing that really makes the new school look more smooth and less erratic is using shorter poles in the bumps.  Us old schoolers have a lot of wild pole flicks even when trying to keep our hands out front due to having to plant on the backside near the top of the bumps higher than we would skiing on groomed or powder.  Using poles in the bumps about a foot shorter than we use on groomed or other non bumped/rutted terrain eliminates that excess arm motion.

 

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool47 View Post
 

The title of this thread should read "Is Jack Taylor the paradigm?" My cat thought my mouse was a real mouse and pawed it, which posted the thread before I corrected the title.

 

 

There. Fixed it for you.

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
"Prior to Taylor’s arrival on the freestyle scene, moguls competitors could be judged on ‘recovery,’ a trademark of early ‘hotdogging’ to perform seemingly out of control, knee-busting runs. Taylor brought a sense of precision, control, and the tight, compact style reflected by today’s competitive mogul scene. He helped pioneer the compact, controlled style mogul skiing is known for today."
 
Source: Lord Of Freestyle: The Legend Of ‘Little’ Jack Taylor
 
"Jack visualized his hands and eyes forming an isosceles triangle," Rusty Taylor said. "He always kept his eyes and hands in the same plane, and his goal was never to let one side of the triangle get longer than the other."
 
Source: Tom Ross remembers: Little Jack lived and skied large.
 

 

    

post #6 of 7
Notice the Spademan bindings with no toe pieces.
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Old school.

 

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