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Best Resort for Mid March 2016: Very Mixed Group (No True experts)???? Help! - Page 2

post #31 of 65
I'd tell them to come here, but the long term forecast for this winter looks bad and mid March, who knows? But last year we were having rain and falling slush around then. Can't believe I get two of these winters back to back..

But to the OP. When they says it's going to be La Nina, come here.
post #32 of 65
I do think Big Sky is quite good for intermediates.  I some potential controversy about keeping gung-ho teenage boys away from Lone Peak before they are sufficiently skilled to be safe up there. To me the key is this:
Quote:
  I have a group that is looking for their first western Mountain experience.
With so many resorts to choose from, I say save the places with marquee expert terrain for a later date when those boys will be able to appreciate it.

The converse is true also.  When they are hotshots they might complain about "not enough steeps" at a place like Bachelor for a whole week.  For now Bachelor would be perfect and offer more than enough challenge with long runs and wide open ungroomed snow.
Edited by Tony Crocker - 11/7/15 at 10:58am
post #33 of 65

I think the mid-March timeframe might be more of a concern for Big Sky for this group than whether or not the parent can make sure the teens and other friends stay on appropriate terrain.  In this case, the parent is over 50, so probably has enough life experience to make good decisions to keep everyone safe.  The nice part about a destination resort like Big Sky is that between the free mountain tour and plenty of friendly Mountain Hosts at the base who are happy to answer questions, people going for the first time can easily learn what they need to know about where to go skiing.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 
Quote:
I've skied big sky several times, and definitely sounds like a good fit in terms of terrain - before the tram it was considered one of the best places for intermediate skiing, and still has loads of options in the range OP asked about.

Most of that intermediate terrain is on the low intermediate side.  For the OP's description, none of the Lone Peak runs (serious terrain with fall consequences) are appropriate.  Not a great situation for the

Quote:
Two Teenage gunners (aggressive, but medium skills based on Small eastern Sliding: 1 is a snow boarder, One a Skier).

What I disagree with is the idea that there isn't terrain that's a challenge for solid intermediates or adventurous intermediates ready to go exploring off groomed trails.  The glades on Andesite, as well as the wide open area under Thunder that is not groomed could be great fun for an entire day.  When I took the free mountain tour, the group was mostly senior skiers (ages 60-75) from the northeast who were old enough to want to take it easy most of the time even though they said they skied easy trees and steeper groomers back home.  She pointed out lots of places for them to consider during their ski week.

 

Agree that this particular group would not be skiing off the tram.  But I do not want to leave the impression that intermediates should avoid Big Sky, especially with Moonlight blue cruisers available too.

post #34 of 65

Two of the biggest names, largest in area, with the smallest of crowds even if it is during spring break, would be Aspen and Big Sky/Moonlight Basin.

 

Big Sky doesn't have a very impressive village, imo and apres-skiing is limited to small number of places.

 

Aspen has the option of staying in town or slope side at Snowmass or less expensive accommodation down the valley in Basalt. There is an excellent bus service between the 4 mountains and down the valley even beyond Basalt, so a car is not necessary. If a rental car is part of the trip then there is free day parking at Snowmass near the lifts if there a 3 or 4 (I'm not really sure of the #) people in the car. There are also park and ride lots in Basalt and just before the turn off the highway to Snowmass.

post #35 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

Two of the biggest names, largest in area, with the smallest of crowds even if it is during spring break, would be Aspen and Big Sky/Moonlight Basin.

 

Big Sky doesn't have a very impressive village, imo and apres-skiing is limited to small number of places.

 

Aspen has the option of staying in town or slope side at Snowmass or less expensive accommodation down the valley in Basalt. There is an excellent bus service between the 4 mountains and down the valley even beyond Basalt, so a car is not necessary. If a rental car is part of the trip then there is free day parking at Snowmass near the lifts if there a 3 or 4 (I'm not really sure of the #) people in the car. There are also park and ride lots in Basalt and just before the turn off the highway to Snowmass.


For a group of beginner/intermediates going in mid-March, if cost isn't that much of an issue, I'd say flying to ASE, staying slope side at Snowmass, and skiing at Snowmass and Buttermilk could be a very fun ski vacation.  If intermediate teens like park, then might really enjoy more than one day at Buttermilk.  Since there are green, blue, and black trails there, any intermediate adults in the group could have a good time there too.  Certainly no worries about crowds at Buttermilk from what I've read.

post #36 of 65

I'll put in a word for Solitude.  I took my family there for a week a couple of years ago and we had a great time.  Definitely planning to go back sometime.  Sure it's not the biggest resort around but when you factor in Brighton right next door there's more than enough variety for a 5 day ski trip.  When we were there, we got the combined pass one day and although we had to take a short shuttle trip to get to Brighton (the Solitude->Brighton trail was closed), we were able to ski back no problems.  Also, with suitable caution, the OP and his two 'gunners' will likely greatly enjoy Honeycomb Canyon.  That run is super cool for a mini adventure psuedo backcountry type experience.

 

As others have noted though, Solitude isn't really a name mountain and there also isn't much in the way of night life, so if those things really are priorities then go elsewhere.  If you just want to focus on the skiing then I think Solitude is a great choice.  The "village" is pretty small but has all you need for a trip of that length, and we found the accommodation to be of a good standard.

post #37 of 65

It would be easy to look down your nose at the desire for a "name" mountain, but the more I think about it the more I come to think there is nothing wrong with it.  (Not my cup of tea, but so what?)  Although "undiscovered" and hard-to-get-to might serve the same social function instead.

 

But "name mountiain" is a tough one for us to judge.  Ask around your office -- you might be surprised what mountains people have never heard of.  I remember how surprised people were when I told them I was going skiing in New Mexico.  New Mexico?  They have snow in New Mexico?  Isn't it always hot there???

 

I wonder what the best known are among non-skiers?

post #38 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

It would be easy to look down your nose at the desire for a "name" mountain, but the more I think about it the more I come to think there is nothing wrong with it.  (Not my cup of tea, but so what?)  Although "undiscovered" and hard-to-get-to might serve the same social function instead.

 

But "name mountiain" is a tough one for us to judge.  Ask around your office -- you might be surprised what mountains people have never heard of.  I remember how surprised people were when I told them I was going skiing in New Mexico.  New Mexico?  They have snow in New Mexico?  Isn't it always hot there???

 

I wonder what the best known are among non-skiers?


I would think big mountain destinations that get mentioned in the travel section of media outlets like Forbes, the NY Times, or USA Today have more name recognition among Americans who have no interest in giving skiing a try.  Especially those who live in metropolitan areas like NYC, Houston, Chicago, etc.  Harder to say about Californians since Tahoe and Mammoth are more or less within driving distance.

post #39 of 65

I noticed no one used the four letter word around here yet - VAIL. :duck:  :ROTF 

post #40 of 65

It's funny, I was one of the first to reply with lots of suggestions and I didn't even consider Vail.  It's actually not a terrible option, but there is a certain amount of hassle and expense that goes into skiing Vail which can be avoided at a lot of other places.

 

As for places non-skiers have heard of...Aspen has to be one with Vail not too far behind.  After that...Jackson Hole maybe?

post #41 of 65
:hopmad:OMG:hopmad:
Not Vail!
No one ever had any fun there!
post #42 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Streak View Post

OMG:hopmad:
Not Vail!
No one ever had any fun there!

 

Vail is too crowded. No one goes there anymore. :D 

post #43 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

It would be easy to look down your nose at the desire for a "name" mountain, but the more I think about it the more I come to think there is nothing wrong with it.  (Not my cup of tea, but so what?)  Although "undiscovered" and hard-to-get-to might serve the same social function instead.

 

But "name mountiain" is a tough one for us to judge.  Ask around your office -- you might be surprised what mountains people have never heard of.  I remember how surprised people were when I told them I was going skiing in New Mexico.  New Mexico?  They have snow in New Mexico?  Isn't it always hot there???

 

I wonder what the best known are among non-skiers?

 

 

Don't ever tell a non skiing cat lover or animal rights person that you are going cat skiing.They will be :duck:

post #44 of 65
Keeping in mind two of the OP's initial comments, keeping cost down and El Niño considerations. I'd suggest SLC. Stay there, rent a car and make day trips to any of the 10 or so resorts within an hour. You can get there cheap, ski the same day, stay at lower altitude in SLC. The only thing you don't get is the resort experience. For that, how about Copper. Great intermediate mountain with long runs and cheap skiing. I got 2 for 1 coupons so lift tickets were only $55/ day. You can stay in the village relatively cheaply. Keep in mind altitude is 9700' though. Steamboat does allow the elimination of a car rental if you fly directly into Yampa but then getting groceries, another cost saver is more difficult. Steamboat altitude is ~7500' so a bit lower than Copper and spring can bring softer conditions down low. The town is great experience.
post #45 of 65
Vail for mixed ability group is the best .

Many of the areas have different ability levels right next to the others so halfway down when it gets easier you can meet up and ski the rest together .

An area like Copper is strictly segmented with advanced on the left looking uphill and the far right beginner runs . I love the mountain but td not good for a mixed group of ability levels that want to ski together .
post #46 of 65

If the OP really wants to save $, then stay in the east. If the OP really wants to experience western skiing, then stay slope side or in a real ski town, not a city.

post #47 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

If the OP really wants to save $, then stay in the east. If the OP really wants to experience western skiing, then stay slope side or in a real ski town, not a city.


Note that the OP was asking for friends who are clearly going on a ski trip just to be able to have the experience, not because they are "skiers".  He wanted to get ideas from others because how he plans a ski trip for himself is quite different.

 

Post #1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post
 

I have a group that is looking for their first western Mountain experience./

 

It'll be: 1 Strong Intermediate 55 year old Dad.

           2. Two Teenage gunners (aggressive, but medium skills based on Small eastern Sliding: 1 is a snow boarder, One a Skier).

           3. 30 Year old couple, intermediate at best skiers with middling levels of fitness.

 

They are looking for a real deal western resort experience, that is, a name mountain, notably different from what we have back east with off mountain options (and money is a bit of a concern).

 

They are going mid march of 2016.

 

My Suggestions were:

 

1. Steamboat

2. Snowmass

 

and dark horse 3rd:

 

3. Solitude (delivers on terrain, cost and crowds, but maybe not on other aspects).

 

What else should be in mi???  They don't have passports and want to stay in the Continental US, and I was looking 'southerly' due to El Nino.  (Telluride is probably too hard and too much, Taos, just too hard).  I thought maybe Batchelor if the snow lines up.....

post #48 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

Most of that intermediate terrain is on the low intermediate side.  For the OP's description, none of the Lone Peak runs (serious terrain with fall consequences) are appropriate.  Not a great situation for the


Hmmm . . . I guess we see it differently.  I see a good range of intermediate terrain, from stuff that's just above the harder greens to stuff that's just short of the easier blacks.  Of course it depends on conditions, but the various intermediate runs off of Ramcharger on Andesite are pretty good intermediate runs, especially if they haven't been groomed, not to mention Moonlight.  While there may be limited selections at any given skill level, I've found that there's a well-covered range from bunny to super challenging, without large gaps or jumps.

post #49 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

It would be easy to look down your nose at the desire for a "name" mountain, but the more I think about it the more I come to think there is nothing wrong with it.  (Not my cup of tea, but so what?)  Although "undiscovered" and hard-to-get-to might serve the same social function instead.

 

But "name mountiain" is a tough one for us to judge.  Ask around your office -- you might be surprised what mountains people have never heard of.  I remember how surprised people were when I told them I was going skiing in New Mexico.  New Mexico?  They have snow in New Mexico?  Isn't it always hot there???

 

I wonder what the best known are among non-skiers?

 

Whenever I talk about skiing with a "Layman" they never know about Snowbasin. Funny enough some have heard of Powder mtn. Man, those 2 mountains would sure fit the bill for these travelers but not sure if they have enough street cred. They could fly to SLC cheap and stay at a nice hotel in Ogden for cheap or rent a condo. Probably not a whole lot of nightlife but terrain-wise and expense-wise, would be perfect. Not a ton of groomed at Powder mtn but they could practice their powder/tree skills on pretty gentle terrain and even take a snowcat ride to a great wide open bowl. Tons of terrain for them at basin.

post #50 of 65

When I visited Snowbasin for the first time last January, I was amazed with how few people were actually there.  Since crowds (both on the lift and on the hill) are one of the most critical factors for me, the fact that I felt like I had Snowbasin all to myself made it a pretty special place to ski.  Great terrain (particularly John Paul area and Strawberry bowl), great lodges, great lifts, and plenty of room to maneuver make it one of my favorite places to ski.  While having the Olympic downhill events there certainly helped it, Snowbasin is in direct competition with the Cottonwood Canyons and Park City and just seems so darn far away from SLC in comparison.  Almost everyone I met while skiing there was either from Ogden (or closer) and had a season pass.  They also thought it was crowded (which was hilarious).  I'll be hitting up Snowbasin in two months and am looking forward to it.  I've skied at almost all the big spots out West and Snowbasin is my 4th favorite ski mountain (only behind Telluride, Aspen Highlands and Snowbird).

post #51 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lofcaudio View Post
 

When I visited Snowbasin for the first time last January, I was amazed with how few people were actually there.  Since crowds (both on the lift and on the hill) are one of the most critical factors for me, the fact that I felt like I had Snowbasin all to myself made it a pretty special place to ski.  Great terrain (particularly John Paul area and Strawberry bowl), great lodges, great lifts, and plenty of room to maneuver make it one of my favorite places to ski.  While having the Olympic downhill events there certainly helped it, Snowbasin is in direct competition with the Cottonwood Canyons and Park City and just seems so darn far away from SLC in comparison.  Almost everyone I met while skiing there was either from Ogden (or closer) and had a season pass.  They also thought it was crowded (which was hilarious).  I'll be hitting up Snowbasin in two months and am looking forward to it.  I've skied at almost all the big spots out West and Snowbasin is my 4th favorite ski mountain (only behind Telluride, Aspen Highlands and Snowbird).

 

One of the cool things about skiing at Snowbasin is being able to ski a good bit the trails used for the Olympic downhill course.  

 

I wonder if the OP has run any of our suggestions by his friends and what their reactions were.  It would be interesting to see if some of our suggestions are shot down due to not being a Western resort experience.

post #52 of 65
Thread Starter 

First of all, Thanks to everyone who chimed in.

 

As of right now, I spoke to my friend and they are zeroing in on Snowmass, Vail, and Steamboat.  I hadn't really thought about Vail at first (I was never a big fan), But it makes good sense for this crew of travelers.

 

All this time thinking about someone else's travel plans I need to start about my own this season....I am stuck with a President's week this season for extended travel, and a week in April...April is easier to figure, but where to go President's week?  Wish it wasn't an El Nino year and I'd head to BC, I might still if the weather holds up.  I thought about driving to Le Massif, spending a night or two in Quebec City and then skiing...

 

Thanks again

post #53 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post
 

I have a group that is looking for their first western Mountain experience./

 

It'll be: 1 Strong Intermediate 55 year old Dad.

           2. Two Teenage gunners (aggressive, but medium skills based on Small eastern Sliding: 1 is a snow boarder, One a Skier).

           3. 30 Year old couple, intermediate at best skiers with middling levels of fitness.

 

They are looking for a real deal western resort experience, that is, a name mountain, notably different from what we have back east with off mountain options (and money is a bit of a concern).

 

They are going mid march of 2016.

 

My Suggestions were:

 

1. Steamboat

2. Snowmass

 

and dark horse 3rd:

 

3. Solitude (delivers on terrain, cost and crowds, but maybe not on other aspects).

 

What else should be in mi???  They don't have passports and want to stay in the Continental US, and I was looking 'southerly' due to El Nino.  (Telluride is probably too hard and too much, Taos, just too hard).  I thought maybe Batchelor if the snow lines up.....

 

Can the Op clarify what type of terrain this group is looking for? 

 

Are you looking for...

1. Best chance of getting on powder.

2. Tree Skiing

3. Bowl skiing

4. Something else

 

 

Bowls are generally the type of terrain that doesn't exist in the East. Of that list, I would probably say Solitude. Steamboat doesn't have much in the way of bowls and the alpine terrain at Snowmass is going to likely be too tough.

 

Telluride in Resolution Bowl may be good. 

 

Two mountains with really excellent intermediate/advanced bowl terrain are Loveland and Arapahoe Basin. However, these are ski areas with no lodging at the base. Both will give you a good feel for what Western skiing is all about- big wide open spaces to play. If this trip is happening during prime Spring Break time, I would choose Loveland over A-Basin for crowd reasons. Loveland has more intermediate terrain anyways.

 

If what the OP is looking for is powder and trees, I would take a gander at Wolf. Wolf has the best trees I've ever skied (1000 acres with no cut runs) and many of them are really approachable for an intermediate. We have some bowl terrain,. but it isn't much to write home about. The opportunity to get on soft snow is among the best in the intermountain West and better than any major resort (Grand Targhee beats us in that regard, but few others have a more favorable snow/skier visits ratio). This is if your group is really looking to venture off the groom. If not, you group would be quickly bored. You will also be staying 30 minutes away on either side of the pass- no ski in ski out here.

post #54 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post
 

First of all, Thanks to everyone who chimed in.

 

As of right now, I spoke to my friend and they are zeroing in on Snowmass, Vail, and Steamboat.  I hadn't really thought about Vail at first (I was never a big fan), But it makes good sense for this crew of travelers.

 

All this time thinking about someone else's travel plans I need to start about my own this season....I am stuck with a President's week this season for extended travel, and a week in April...April is easier to figure, but where to go President's week?  Wish it wasn't an El Nino year and I'd head to BC, I might still if the weather holds up.  I thought about driving to Le Massif, spending a night or two in Quebec City and then skiing...

 

Thanks again


If you want to look at threads related to their top choices, I added links for all of them.  Look under Topics Discussed (right hand column).  Scroll down to the bottom of a Resort Page to get to the list of tagged threads.

 

Does that mean you'll be in in LCC in April?  I'll be there around the time of the Alta Demo Day.

post #55 of 65
Quote:
As of right now, I spoke to my friend and they are zeroing in on Snowmass, Vail, and Steamboat.

For mid-March Snowmass is a clear cut choice.   Blue Sky and some of the front of Vail will be as good, but the the main Back Bowls will need to be timed for sun.  As noted earlier, Steamboat is lower and mostly sun exposed and not recommended that late in the season.

 

Locals can chime in here, but depending upon how many spring breaks hit your week, Vail could be busy, and it's always busier than Aspen/Snowmass. Not as busy as Christmas and probably not as busy as President's week though.

post #56 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post
 

First of all, Thanks to everyone who chimed in.

 

As of right now, I spoke to my friend and they are zeroing in on Snowmass, Vail, and Steamboat.  I hadn't really thought about Vail at first (I was never a big fan), But it makes good sense for this crew of travelers.

 

All this time thinking about someone else's travel plans I need to start about my own this season....I am stuck with a President's week this season for extended travel, and a week in April...April is easier to figure, but where to go President's week?  Wish it wasn't an El Nino year and I'd head to BC, I might still if the weather holds up.  I thought about driving to Le Massif, spending a night or two in Quebec City and then skiing...

 

Thanks again

One advantage of Snowmass over the other two is that the four Aspen mountains have very different appeal.  The free shuttle system makes it easy to get around.  Could rent skis from the resort shop that moves skis from one mountain to another overnight as part of the service.

 

The group could spend a day at Highlands, which has a local vibe that most destinations resorts like Vail and Steamboat don't.  The view from the patrol shack at the summit is great.  I would think they could also have fun at Ajax seeing the view from the gondola and taking their time on the long blue cruisers.  Being able to say they skied Ruthie's might mean something in the future to someone who follows ski racing.  Great views of Highlands Bowl from Ajax too.

post #57 of 65

Of those three, easy choice for me: Snowmass!  Vail would be a very distant 2nd, with Steamboat not even considered primarily for the reasons Tony stated.  The primary knock against Snowmass is cost, but overall cost would most likely be less than Vail.  Terrain and crowds alone are enough for my to fully endorse Snowmass.  Access to Highlands and Ajax make it a no-brainer, IMO.

post #58 of 65

I think you can't beat the scenery at Ajax.  Nature is nice and all, but that feeling that you are dropping onto the top of buildings adds so much perspective (in the literal, optical sense).

post #59 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lofcaudio View Post

It's funny, I was one of the first to reply with lots of suggestions and I didn't even consider Vail.  It's actually not a terrible option, but there is a certain amount of hassle and expense that goes into skiing Vail which can be avoided at a lot of other places.

As for places non-skiers have heard of...Aspen has to be one with Vail not too far behind.  After that...Jackson Hole maybe?
Perhaps I can provide some perspective on this since I live in the Houston Metro area.... A couple weeks ago, I was at the food court at the mall and to my surprise, Vail Resorts was running a Park City ad over and over on a HUGE screen right smack in the middle of the place..... So of course I knew I had to act quickly to save my Epic Local Pass. I made sure everyone in there knew how bad Park City really was. 😉 Just kidding, I'm pretty I convinced my friends that they need to go 😂
Most people seem to also know about Breck and Vail.
post #60 of 65
@Liam I'm slightly confused, have you crossed off Utah? If you have, I hope you reconsider. Both of the teens in your group sound like myself, aggressive advanced intermediates. I have an Epic Pass this year, so I will be spending most my time in Colorado, but most of my short 17 years have been spent skiing in Utah. I'll even be going to the University of Utah next year.

While Salt Lake is not so glamorous, it is still incredibly beautiful, and there are plenty of non skiing activities as well:
Go check out the LDS Temple Square in Downtown Salt Lake, it is truly gorgeous. The City Creek mall is probably one of the coolest malls around. If you're feeling sciency, go check out Clark Planetarium. If you're a basketball fan, go catch a Jazz game. For some more snow stuff, go tubing at Gorgoza Park off of I-80 by Jeremy Ranch. If you're at Park City, make a stop by the Utah Olympic Park. If for some reason you like mines, go check out Bingham Copper Mine, the world's largest open pit mine. Just don't go swimming in the Great Salt Lake. Gross 😷😂
Back to skiing: I'm surprised that no one has said anything about Powder Mountain. I'm biased towards it, because that's where I first powder skied on 18 inches of fluff. Best Christmas Day ever! I know in the spring, the conditions can be slightly iffy, but if it's a powder day, do yourselves a favor and rent some fat skis and head to PowMow. You will be skiing freshies all day, 9am to 4pm, instead of the usual 9am to 10am. Most slopes are low angled enough that iffy intermediates can easily handle them, and there are plenty of steeper runs to keep advanced intermediates entertained.

As far as skiing Park City in mid-March, it can be iffy as well. But it is probably the best intermediate mountain in the West when conditions are good. I was there last March, and it was hard pack skiing til noon, then I was skiing some pretty fun tree runs and slush bumps the rest of the day.

Snowbird, Solitude, and Brighton are your bet bets for snow. Brighton is probably the best for a group of mixed intermediates. The price is wallet friendly, the snow is great, there is plenty of terrain variety, and the crowds are very low. Brighton skis bigger than it is.

If you decide on Colorado, you can't go wrong with Snowmass. It's not as pricey as you think and it's probably the best in Colorado for your group. They lowered their Teen multi-day ticket rates to $59 per day this year when you purchase 7 days in advance. When I was there in March 2014, the snow was fantastic (But the advance purchase teen rate was $298 for 3 days!). If you want budget lodging, stay 40 minutes down the road at the Hanging Lake Inn in Glenwood Springs. The owners are super nice, and they sell discounted lift tickets.

Unless you have a lot of money, or plan to ski there more than 6 or 7 times (in which case you could get an Epic Local Pass for $620 for adults, and $480 for teens), Vail is just not worth the $150 per day. I will be spending my skiing time there this year because of the cheap season passes and awesome back bowls, but nowhere is worth $150 per day (unless it's cat-skiing😄).
Here are some pictures-
Snowmass March 2014

Canyons (Park City) March 2015

Powder Mountain December 2014

Hope this helps! 😀
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