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post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Skinny skis.

 

post #2 of 24

Haha ..... his knee pads are on the outside of his pants

 

So, where do  you stand on the burning two pole plant controversy??

post #3 of 24

I think OS47 learned at Tomahawk so it 's ok to  double sometimes. Do you remember Tomahawk OS47?

post #4 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool47 View Post
 

Skinny skis.

 

 

You are 54 years old and skiing Strawberry Fields at Squaw with your alpine skis during a snow storm when you begin hearing "Astral Weeks" by Van Morrison. You are not using a portable music player. You are having a religious vision. The revelation tells you that your purpose in life for the next 10 years is to learn to tight-turn telemark carve at a 5.5 level (tennis lingo) on metal-edged XC skis in all snow conditions on 30 to 40 degree slopes. All snow conditions = corn, packed-powder, and powder. You decide that you must move to the Truckee/Tahoe area in the next 3 years to achieve your goal. 

post #5 of 24

Great video!  should be entitled "Deconstructing and Reconstructing Varieties of the Telemark Turn"

post #6 of 24

Howdy Folks.

 

New Guy here.

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Lutes View Post
 

Haha ..... his knee pads are on the outside of his pants

 

GET OFF MY LAWN!

 

[Getting Old ain't for sissies.  ;)]

 

We used to wear them on the inside until you wore holes in the knees of your pants, then wear them on the outside to cover the holes. Used to ski the bumps pretty hard, & my knee would whack my ski or a bump on every turn. Hard on britches.

 

In the photo, my left knee pad is flopping around. You can see the duct tape covering the hole in my pants underneath.

 

In those days, ski clothes were not that bomber. Especially mine.

 

 

So far as the double pole plant goes, no thanks. A recovery move in my book. I wasn't aware there was a controversy. In the mid 80s in the Wasatch the double pole plant was still in use, but considered obsolete by the shredders. The difference was too obvious to be controversial.

 

In any case, I don't care how other folks ski, as long as they're safe, having fun, and not trashing my line. ;)

 

PS: These days, I have bulletproof gear, and always wear my knee pads on the inside. Happy?

 

:)

post #7 of 24
Beautiful. Can a guy over 60 with no significant alpine experience learn to do this? I'm more interested in trekking through rolling old growth forest tha racing an avalanche down the face of a mountain in virgin snow. I just moved to Tacoma Wa and want to play in the Olympics or Cascades.
post #8 of 24

Awesome video!

post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tree Lee View Post
 

Howdy Folks.

 

New Guy here.

 

 

 

 

 

GET OFF MY LAWN!

 

[Getting Old ain't for sissies.  ;)]

 

We used to wear them on the inside until you wore holes in the knees of your pants, then wear them on the outside to cover the holes. Used to ski the bumps pretty hard, & my knee would whack my ski or a bump on every turn. Hard on britches.

 

In the photo, my left knee pad is flopping around. You can see the duct tape covering the hole in my pants underneath.

 

In those days, ski clothes were not that bomber. Especially mine.

 

 

So far as the double pole plant goes, no thanks. A recovery move in my book. I wasn't aware there was a controversy. In the mid 80s in the Wasatch the double pole plant was still in use, but considered obsolete by the shredders. The difference was too obvious to be controversial.

 

In any case, I don't care how other folks ski, as long as they're safe, having fun, and not trashing my line. ;)

 

PS: These days, I have bulletproof gear, and always wear my knee pads on the inside. Happy?

 

:)

Ah, the 80s ….. good times.  The double pole plant was just  a test question to make sure you weren't someone else ;)

 

Stopped using knee pads, after realizing I hadn't bumped my knees in over  decade.  Might start again just to keep my aging knees a little warmer.  In my "youth" I had a pair of bright pink knee pads that I wore over purple leopard striped tights in the Spring - "I think I might throw up"  was a common response. 

post #10 of 24

Hello Paul.

 

I'm an old dog, and I wear my knee pads mostly to keep my knees warm these days. It helps. And they still come in handy if you fall off your bar stool.

 

"bright pink knee pads that I wore over purple leopard striped tights in the Spring"

 

Just reading that made me go blind in one eye.

 

 

More 80s.

 

Voile' plates. Yes? No?

post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tree Lee View Post
 

Howdy Folks.

 

New Guy here.

 

 

....

 

We used to wear them on the inside until you wore holes in the knees of your pants, then wear them on the outside to cover the holes. Used to ski the bumps pretty hard, & my knee would whack my ski or a bump on every turn. Hard on britches.

 

...

 

I just noticed that yesterday as I was pulling my shell/pants off - the inside is getting frayed. I've used them for years including volunteer patrolling, so I am getting my moneys worth. I've been putting the pads on for so long I feel kind of odd without them on. Naked like. ;) They do keep my knees warm, but maybe cold would be better - reduce inflammation.

 

My knees are trashed and I can't hardly make decent tele turns anymore, so I'm more like the old alpine skiers of old - on their wood planks. Loose heels, alpine turns, but I still like using the same old gear. Well not too old. 

 

I geared up 10 years or so ago and then had a crisis - family, work, knees. The drive from Santa Cruz to Truckee took a big toll on my family responsibilities (new born),  work, well it is what it is, and my knees hurt every tele turn I made. Takes some of the joy out of it. But spin the time dial and now here we are in Portland, 60 miles from Hood Meadows and my now early teen daughter is getting into snow boarding (I did that). So I'm hitting the slopes on basically New Old Stock gear: Karhu  Jak BC 180 with G3 bindings; Line Assassin 176 with Linken stepins.

 

And for different conditions, I still have my beat up but still wonderful Tua CrossRide 110 with G3s and Tua Excaliber with Rainey SuperLoops (my "skinny" skis).

 

My old Garmont boots are pretty darn old and I was thinking it would be nice to have a new set of boots. So I started looking online and I was like "What the hell is NTN? and why isn't there a huge selection of 75mm tele boots?" Wow, it slowly dawned on me that I've become the leather boot, 3-pin guy of yesteryear in plastic boots!

 

I hate change! :ROTF

 

BTW, I couldn't make it through that video. I know it's just a teaching session, but all that double poling hurt my head. I suspect he probably did that for beginners, maintaining your balance on those skinny skis with leathers is a difficult thing for first timers. I know - the very first time I skied, it was on that exact gear in the mid 80s.

 

Still, a tough thing to unlearn if you start that way.

 

 

-jim

post #12 of 24

Think of it as a return to the days of your youth when all things were new and possible, simply requiring more patience and a willingness to play the fool ….. until you hit that threshold where suddenly everyone is saying "when I get old I want to be like you"!  

 

I was about to give up freewheeling, due to the incompatibility of 75 mm boots and my changing feet; gave NTN a go and was re-born.  Pretty much stick to groomers and sunny days, but I've never enjoyed more than I am now! 

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

Beautiful. Can a guy over 60 with no significant alpine experience learn to do this? .........

Yes we can. Lots of fun at and around Summit at Snoqualmie. You don't say where you are from. I moved here from CNY and learned it's a vertical world out here. Poking around is much safer in the spring.   There is a skier buried under the snow in the final zoom in shot. Be careful. 

 

post #14 of 24
Wooley

We are neighbors. I currently reside at Joint Base Lewis McChord. Due to my advanced age the Army will kick me out in about a year. We will retire right around here I think I want to ski and snowshoe through the forest when I retire. Learning my way around a fly rod is on the bucket list too. Kids from around the world assembled at my house for Christmas. My favorite few hours was snowshoeing around the beaver pond at Longmire.

Hope to meet you in the woods some day soon. I've seen photos of a gently sloped meadow on Rainier with ski tracks across it In ungroomed snow.. Do you know one or mora locations like that?

I have some old Merrel nnnbc boots that were a gift. They are practically giving away Karhu Backcountyr skis 190cm on the great auction site in the sky. One cannot get a discount on the NNN BC bindings. I was thinking about buying the skis and taking them to the local shop for retail bindings properly installed what do you think?

Excited to hear from you. Happy New Year.
post #15 of 24

post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 

 

 

post #17 of 24
Paul. Thanks for the encouragement.
post #18 of 24

My left thumb tells me when rain is coming from a fall doing that on soft, hero corn. If I did that that today I would have left my left thumb behind. 

post #19 of 24

Robb55- Neighbors depends on the time of day. I just got back from taking a grand kid to Tacoma from North Bend and back. 2:45 round trip. Saw a bunch of your guys broke down on the 18 rest stop. Anyway, nice crew you have there. If you can, have them kick you out before ski season ends in...... wait, it doesn't end. I don't know about meadow skipping around Rainier. I've seen some good guide books detailing snow shoe and Nordic tours. Good place to start. 

 

I'm a luddite in leather and 3-pins myself but I've learned that what ever your first rig is, it will work and it will teach you about what your 2nd rig should be. And third. 

 

Send me a PM with a heads up if you ever plan to head this way and I'll show you around the parts of my back yard at The Pass that I'm allowed to play in. 

 

BTW, My dad was 1st Ranger (first re-man, not original) and then FSSF from Africa to Norway. Surprisingly, he was able to tell me a lot of wild, crazy stories. I'll talk your ear off if you let me. 

 

And never grow up.

 

post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

Wooley

We are neighbors. I currently reside at Joint Base Lewis McChord. Due to my advanced age the Army will kick me out in about a year. We will retire right around here I think I want to ski and snowshoe through the forest when I retire. Learning my way around a fly rod is on the bucket list too. Kids from around the world assembled at my house for Christmas. My favorite few hours was snowshoeing around the beaver pond at Longmire.

Hope to meet you in the woods some day soon. I've seen photos of a gently sloped meadow on Rainier with ski tracks across it In ungroomed snow.. Do you know one or mora locations like that?

I have some old Merrel nnnbc boots that were a gift. They are practically giving away Karhu Backcountyr skis 190cm on the great auction site in the sky. One cannot get a discount on the NNN BC bindings. I was thinking about buying the skis and taking them to the local shop for retail bindings properly installed what do you think?

Excited to hear from you. Happy New Year.

 

Henry M. Jackson Visitor Center - one of my "why aren't I there?" webcams I like to look at.

 

My wife and I go to a lot of estate sales. I frequently find reasonably priced Nordic skis with NNN bindings. I even picked up some broken in shoes  in my size - not boots, so I am guessing suitable for a groomed track? The skis are never beat up either, not like my tele gear gets. One time at a garage sale in Scappose they just gave me two sets of skis, shoes and poles.

 

-jim

 

 

-jim

post #21 of 24
Actually thinking bout moving to Issaquah when I retire. Might be a bit more neighborly. Guess I need to visit some yard sales.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

Actually thinking bout moving to Issaquah when I retire. Might be a bit more neighborly. Guess I need to visit some yard sales.


Think hard about Issaquah.  I was born and raised there and worked the first half of my professional career there.  If you like living in the city, I guess it's OK.  It's cute, but not a small community as they like to paint it.  After graduating from college in Bellingham I moved back to Issaquah with my wife, bought a home, had kids, etc.  As YUPies it was a fun place to be, but as we got a bit older we started to notice that it took a minimum of 40 minutes to get to anything at all, even grocery shopping due to the spread out nature of the area and the atrocious traffic.  This is in the early 90s, it's much worse now.  We decided to move back to Bellingham and have never looked back. In all of my time in Issaquah after high school I can't remember once running into anyone I knew on the street in town.  In Bellingham I ran into two people I knew the first day.

 

Issaquah is a suburb, and as such it is a small piece of the huge Puget Sound region.  Everyone is from somewhere else, they head off to various parts of the Seattle area for work, and live in their neighborhoods designed to insulate them from each other.  You simply have a tough time meeting and knowing your neighbors since their lives and yours don't intersect anywhere else.

 

Bellingham is the center of its region.  It's the "big city" at 80,000 population.  It has a lower cost of living, older homes (not exclusively), and a very focused community feel.  It takes 5-10 minutes to get almost anywhere in town.  Everyone is on the same page since the book is so much smaller.  Access to the mountains is similar to the Puget Sound region.

 

I'm not trying to sell moving to Bellingham, but rather to get you to think HARD about retiring in a place like Issaquah.  There are lots of places in the region that are much more convenient and tolerable.

post #23 of 24
Nice to know. We are just looking now. My wife likes Tacoma.
post #24 of 24

Tacoma offers a lot of options and life styles. Mt daughter loved living by Pt. Defiance and the waterfront. Now she's in Fircrest. Mellow small town feel and the kids can walk to school. IME, Women want to go TO something. One of the tricks I used to get my wife to move closer to the mountains was to send her links to houses that I liked and that she would like but where I wanted to be. It took me 4 years but it was a 3000 mile trip and our 1st move.

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