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Bit of help please [skis for Keystone and midwest groomers]

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Ive been online for days. Yesterday from noon til 11. Ridiculous. I just am seeing too many conflicting reports and great reviews of brands I've never heard of. Anyway, hope y'all can help me out.

  1. Where in the world are you skiing? We ski Keystone and will try A-Basin a day or two this year. Blues and greens. No blacks unless its Afton Alps in which case all blacks are green elsewhere.

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry) So far strictly groomed and I am buying this ski only for groomed. I have no intention of riding in the park and I do intend to end up in the bowls someday but then I'll buy a ski for that.

  3. How many days a year do you ski? 10-12 for a total of maybe 20-22 days. I skied a LOT of cross country as a kid and young adult. Skied them downhill as well so it was easy to take up downhill skiing and progress quickly. My wife has 12 years of downhill experience and on terrain we both know I excel. On new terrain she excels.

  4. How advanced are you as a skier? I've read how folks dont like the ski 'level' system but I'll use it for this answer. At Keystone I consider myself a 5 with many level 6 characteristics. I am solidly a 5 and man do I love to ski! If I had skied as a kid I would be poor and never have met my wife. But, I cant say I'd be a sad and lonely man as I'd be grinning with my ski bum friends.

  5. What's your height and weight? 6' 2 3/4" 215lbs.

So in addition I will say that I ski with my family. So while I love speed I need a ski that loves my weight while loving to play around at lower speeds on the blues at Keystone. Last year I skied every blue at Keystone except one, which I walked down because it scared the hell out of me. I fell twice on it and after that I just couldnt get up the guts to continue. Ina told me it should really be a dark purple. I dont remember which it was but it was on The Outback. Probably Porcupine but could have been Oh, Bob. Either way, to me it was just straight down madness. I also will say that what I was having serious trouble with at that run was getting started again after the first fall. I couldnt bring myself to dive straight down it so I wanted to start "hopping" back and forth. I would have preferred to go diagonal across the thing but there were a lot of people and I didnt want to be in their way. So I got to the side and started trying the "hopping" left and right. My skis are 186cm BBRs and 2kg plus bindings each. Not super heavy but that nose just kept whipping around and getting in each others way, so I continued to trip myself up. I love skiing these skis but in that same situation again I would prefer something lighter and shorter with less of a nose on it. Whats great about the BBRs for me is that they are super stable, hold on great on ice, fast and when you learn to use just the edges for carving its just fantastic. They get so fast and smooth carving, but on the other hand thats when I get to far from my family and its about spending time on the slopes with them.

I just bought 2015 Volkl RTM Jr for both daughters. $79 used in perfect condition with bindings!!! Bargain! BTW that was at banhoff if you need the same deal. My wife tells me she things Volkl are the best out there and maybe they are but I am seeing lots of great talk about Blizzard, Elan and Kastle as well.

One thing thats been eating at me is the length. I see lots of guys my size skiing over 190. Probably they are better than me and are bombing down the hill. I love to turn and enjoy the Gs of turning large fast turns and when I get to a steep area with lots of uneven terrain I dont want to have skis that resist picking my way through. Like on Mozart last year. You get near the bottom and there is this steep bowl looking area with lots of bumps (not made of snow but of land) that you need to navigate at a slower speed. Skis at 190 would be a problem for me there. Then, I head over to a British forum and all the guys my size are running 175 or even 170. I was a bit perplexed.

I guess thats a good and confusing start but now you know how I feel! Oh, my boots are Lange XT 120. I love them. They are quite tight and thats they way I like it. I like to feel like my feet are the ski.

Uriah

post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by udailey View Post
 
  1. No blacks unless its Afton Alps in which case all blacks are green elsewhere.

     So far strictly groomed and I am buying this ski only for groomed.

  2.  I consider myself a 5 with many level 6 characteristics.

  3. What's your height and weight? 6' 2 3/4" 215lbs.

So in addition I will say that I ski with my family. So while I love speed I need a ski that loves my weight while loving to play around at lower speeds on the blues at Keystone. Last year I skied every blue at Keystone except one, which I walked down because it scared the hell out of me. I fell twice on it and after that I just couldnt get up the guts to continue. Ina told me it should really be a dark purple. I dont remember which it was but it was on The Outback. Probably Porcupine but could have been Oh, Bob. Either way, to me it was just straight down madness. I also will say that what I was having serious trouble with at that run was getting started again after the first fall. I couldnt bring myself to dive straight down it so I wanted to start "hopping" back and forth. I would have preferred to go diagonal across the thing but there were a lot of people and I didnt want to be in their way. So I got to the side and started trying the "hopping" left and right. My skis are 186cm BBRs and 2kg plus bindings each. Not super heavy but that nose just kept whipping around and getting in each others way, so I continued to trip myself up. I love skiing these skis but in that same situation again I would prefer something lighter and shorter with less of a nose on it. Whats great about the BBRs for me is that they are super stable, hold on great on ice, fast and when you learn to use just the edges for carving its just fantastic. They get so fast and smooth carving, but on the other hand thats when I get to far from my family and its about spending time on the slopes with them.

h

 

 

Greetings and welcome.

FWIW, that is the correct length BBR for someone of your size and skill.       Now, the BBR has some very unique features that make it easier to ski and very easy to learn on.     

The one I am thinking of now is the fat tip that tapers down to a slinky waist.       This makes turns on low angle terrain (say during a lesson) very easy to start.    This is true for almost all skiers.       The other thing it does is make people with naturally duck toes feel better about having their feet parallel.

The downside to this design feature is that someone who isn't duck footed and who jumps up off the snow (thereby losing a snow-derived sense of where in space the edges are) will come down in their natural stance.      And the ski acts all pigeon toed.  The tips rub or overlap or get in each others' way.

 

This is very specific to the BBRs and a few other skis with very dramatic taper  - it is not a weight issue and skis far heavier than the BBR don't do it - and the trick to making them work is to change technique.

 

Talking of changing technique, do you expect to take lessons this season?

To my mind, talking about generalised ski length before the type and model is settled is like talking about volume of food.   I'm sure you will see that talking about a quart of food isn't really the best approach until we know if steak, lettuce or cornflakes is being measured.    In XC gear we would never throw out length guidelines unless we knew things like skate or diagonal; mid or full or compact design.  

 

Similarly, talking of brand is like talking of which geographic locale we want our protein to come from.   Imagine saying  'California' or 'Argentina'  before we've picked beef or chicken or fish.    Except that most ski brands are for skis like California is for food and do pretty much everything.

I know that didn't go very far to answering your specific questions.   There is a lot of information on this forum about the generic category of 'Western front side'.     That is the category most appropriate for what you're looking for.     Keep in mind most reviews and most threads will be centered around an expectation of an  L7 ish skier (or higher for halo skis).    This is why the lessons question is important - you already have a skills-assist ski and you really don't need another one.   

Glad to hear about the tight boots.   You've dodged the 'Get boots first!' comments that most other posters would get.



 

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your reply. Ive been noodling around more. Still stuck on getting new/used/blem/demo skis but with other hobbies I'm kind of a collector. Probably here too.

 

When you said: "The downside to this design feature is that someone who isn't duck footed and who jumps up off the snow (thereby losing a snow-derived sense of where in space the edges are) will come down in their natural stance.      And the ski acts all pigeon toed.  The tips rub or overlap or get in each others' way.

 

This is very specific to the BBRs and a few other skis with very dramatic taper  - it is not a weight issue and skis far heavier than the BBR don't do it - and the trick to making them work is to change technique."

 

Yeah, after I fell this is exactly what was going on. Sitting here this morning thinking about that fall it struck me that while I was turning prior to falling the slope was very steep and hard. I think I may have oversteered my right foot turning left. I wanted to make more complete turns to slow down so in finishing that turn I am betting my right ski (the downhill ski) got away from me and shot forward a bit more than 90degrees to the mountainside. That's what dumped me. The ski starts pointing more uphill and of course my butt follows by now pointing downhill. Bam. Then of course the whole bunny hopping left to right failed because of the situation you stated with the ski acting pigeon toed.

 

As to lessons: Ive tried every time we go to the hill to get lessons and my wife is deadset against it. I dont know what her hang up is. Maybe its money maybe its ego maybe she's just satisfied with her skiing. I called ABasin to talk lesson prices because weve got tickets already and most lessons include ticket price. Theyre really busy and asked if I could call back later today. I've got no problem taking lessons and my kids need em plus theyve got those lesson 4 packs that anyone can use. Might be to my advantage!

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by udailey View Post
 

Thanks for your reply. Ive been noodling around more. Still stuck on getting new/used/blem/demo skis but with other hobbies I'm kind of a collector. Probably here too.

 

Well, you're on the right forum for sure.  

Let me toss out an idea for you.       What if you were to get a cheap carving/technical ski somewhere 170-177cm long, 15m-18m radius that would be only for use at your home hill?      You can keep your BBRs for all-mountain use, or you can demo or you can rent when you get to Colorado.      

Pretty much every other idea would actually attempt to replace your BBRs with something that was simultaneously better suited to noodling-about learning and better suited for skiing steepish terrain and better suited to Weeeeeeeehaaaaa type speed.     I'm not saying this goal is impossible, mind.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by udailey View Post. Sitting here this morning thinking about that fall it struck me that while I was turning prior to falling the slope was very steep and hard. I think I may have oversteered my right foot turning left. I wanted to make more complete turns to slow down so in finishing that turn I am betting my right ski (the downhill ski) got away from me and shot forward a bit more than 90degrees to the mountainside. That's what dumped me. The ski starts pointing more uphill and of course my butt follows by now pointing downhill.

 

Well, it sounds like you've got pretty good instincts for what you want.   If I'm reading this right, it also sounds like a solid down-the-hill pole plant, some balancing drills and some upper/lower body separation work could go a long way towards fixing what went wrong.   
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by udailey View Post
 

As to lessons: Ive tried every time we go to the hill to get lessons and my wife is deadset against it. I dont know what her hang up is. Maybe its money maybe its ego maybe she's just satisfied with her skiing. I called ABasin to talk lesson prices because weve got tickets already and most lessons include ticket price. Theyre really busy and asked if I could call back later today. I've got no problem taking lessons and my kids need em plus theyve got those lesson 4 packs that anyone can use. Might be to my advantage!


FWIW, I can sort of see where your wife might be coming from.     Especially if the type of lessons she's had before were
a) deconstruction type lessons where for the first day or two the student feels they can't do anything right - that's just annoying to deal with esp. on trips
b) 'follow me' type lessons where nothing gets really explained except in the vaguest handwaving terms
c) 'biomechanical cookie' lessons aka 'top tips'  where advice is given, (possibly very useful) but never put in context so that one set will be contradicted by the next set (or completely forgotten).

Type a lessons have their place and are best done on your home hill by certified (ask!) instructors.     Type b can work for higher level (like 8+) skiers.    Type c might make a given trip go better but long term just keeps students on plateaus.

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by udailey View Post
 

Thanks for your reply. Ive been noodling around more. Still stuck on getting new/used/blem/demo skis but with other hobbies I'm kind of a collector. Probably here too.

 

When you said: "The downside to this design feature is that someone who isn't duck footed and who jumps up off the snow (thereby losing a snow-derived sense of where in space the edges are) will come down in their natural stance.      And the ski acts all pigeon toed.  The tips rub or overlap or get in each others' way.

 

This is very specific to the BBRs and a few other skis with very dramatic taper  - it is not a weight issue and skis far heavier than the BBR don't do it - and the trick to making them work is to change technique."

 

Yeah, after I fell this is exactly what was going on. Sitting here this morning thinking about that fall it struck me that while I was turning prior to falling the slope was very steep and hard. I think I may have oversteered my right foot turning left. I wanted to make more complete turns to slow down so in finishing that turn I am betting my right ski (the downhill ski) got away from me and shot forward a bit more than 90degrees to the mountainside. That's what dumped me. The ski starts pointing more uphill and of course my butt follows by now pointing downhill. Bam. Then of course the whole bunny hopping left to right failed because of the situation you stated with the ski acting pigeon toed.

 

As to lessons: Ive tried every time we go to the hill to get lessons and my wife is deadset against it. I dont know what her hang up is. Maybe its money maybe its ego maybe she's just satisfied with her skiing. I called ABasin to talk lesson prices because weve got tickets already and most lessons include ticket price. Theyre really busy and asked if I could call back later today. I've got no problem taking lessons and my kids need em plus theyve got those lesson 4 packs that anyone can use. Might be to my advantage!

I'm always curious about parents who think lessons are only for kids. Are your kids better skiers than their mom, or is she better than them at this stage?  Do you intend to keep taking family ski trips out west during school holidays?  If so, then having a lesson or two during a ski vacation out west makes sense in the long run IMHO.

 

I started taking lessons as an advanced skier (any groomed black out west, easier ungroomed blacks at Alta) when my daughter was a tween and had reached Level 7 (of 9).  Took me several years to get from Level 7 to Level 8, including a couple where I skied 50+ days with two trips out west of 10+ days each.  I have the luxury of being retired.  Was I having fun skiing before?  Yes.  Do I have more fun as a Level 8?  Definitely.  Partially because I can easily get away from a crowded lift line almost any where because so much more of any mountain is good fun.

 

From Alta Ski School webpage

Level 6 Maintain a parallel stance and develop a variety of turn sizes and control on blue slopes.
Level 7 Intro to off-trail (small moguls, shallow powder). Work on maintaining a centered stance on all blue and moderate black runs.
Level 8 Develop more confidence and the appropriate blend of skills to ski more challenging terrain. Ski bigger bumps, steeper runs and deeper powder on black diamond runs. Hike and traverse to explore Alta's upper mountain stashes.
Level 9 Use dynamic off-trail skills to creatively ski everything that the mountain has to offer.

You might just go ahead and take lessons yourself and not push your wife for this trip.  I think you'll improve.  Perhaps when she sees how much difference it makes to your skiing, she'll change her mind for the next trip.  I think that's what happened to my ski buddy.  He was an advanced skier at Aspen during high school long ago.  When we started skiing together at a school alumni gathering at Alta, I was just starting to go on more complex terrain.  After I started taking lessons from PSIA Level 3 instructors after having to rehab a knee, both at my local hill in VA and on trips out west, I think he noticed how much I improved in a year or two.  A couple seasons ago, he was willing to join me and another friend (Level 7) in a semi-private lesson at Jackson Hole.  Last season he was willing to do a semi-private lesson with me at Alta.  Bottom line is that we ended up doing three more lessons at Alta during the two trips out there.  He's completely surprised at how much difference it made for him, but very happy about it.

 

By the way, I started taking lessons after age 55 and he's a bit older than I am.  Old dogs can learn new tricks. ;) 

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

I'm always curious about parents who think lessons are only for kids.  
I had a wife like that once.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by udailey View Post

 

So in addition I will say that I ski with my family. So while I love speed I need a ski that loves my weight while loving to play around at lower speeds on the blues at Keystone. Last year I skied every blue at Keystone except one, which I walked down because it scared the hell out of me. I fell twice on it and after that I just couldnt get up the guts to continue. Ina told me it should really be a dark purple. I dont remember which it was but it was on The Outback. Probably Porcupine but could have been Oh, Bob. Either way, to me it was just straight down madness. I also will say that what I was having serious trouble with at that run was getting started again after the first fall. I couldnt bring myself to dive straight down it so I wanted to start "hopping" back and forth. I would have preferred to go diagonal across the thing but there were a lot of people and I didnt want to be in their way. So I got to the side and started trying the "hopping" left and right. My skis are 186cm BBRs and 2kg plus bindings each. Not super heavy but that nose just kept whipping around and getting in each others way, so I continued to trip myself up. I love skiing these skis but in that same situation again I would prefer something lighter and shorter with less of a nose on it. Whats great about the BBRs for me is that they are super stable, hold on great on ice, fast and when you learn to use just the edges for carving its just fantastic. They get so fast and smooth carving, but on the other hand thats when I get to far from my family and its about spending time on the slopes with them.

I just bought 2015 Volkl RTM Jr for both daughters. $79 used in perfect condition with bindings!!! Bargain! BTW that was at banhoff if you need the same deal. My wife tells me she things Volkl are the best out there and maybe they are but I am seeing lots of great talk about Blizzard, Elan and Kastle as well.

One thing thats been eating at me is the length. I see lots of guys my size skiing over 190. Probably they are better than me and are bombing down the hill. I love to turn and enjoy the Gs of turning large fast turns and when I get to a steep area with lots of uneven terrain I dont want to have skis that resist picking my way through. Like on Mozart last year. You get near the bottom and there is this steep bowl looking area with lots of bumps (not made of snow but of land) that you need to navigate at a slower speed. Skis at 190 would be a problem for me there. Then, I head over to a British forum and all the guys my size are running 175 or even 170. I was a bit perplexed.

I guess thats a good and confusing start but now you know how I feel! Oh, my boots are Lange XT 120. I love them. They are quite tight and thats they way I like it. I like to feel like my feet are the ski.

Uriah

 

Just my $0.02 but you should KEEP YOUR SKIS ON!  Walking down a steep icy slope in ski boots carrying your gear is a great way to get seriously injured or to hurt someone else or worse.  Lessons can give you a few tools to practice for those "oh shit" moments.  These techniques can save your bacon and also make you more confident when you are exploring or pushing yourself.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utagonian View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by udailey View Post

 

So in addition I will say that I ski with my family. So while I love speed I need a ski that loves my weight while loving to play around at lower speeds on the blues at Keystone. Last year I skied every blue at Keystone except one, which I walked down because it scared the hell out of me. I fell twice on it and after that I just couldnt get up the guts to continue. Ina told me it should really be a dark purple. I dont remember which it was but it was on The Outback. Probably Porcupine but could have been Oh, Bob. Either way, to me it was just straight down madness. I also will say that what I was having serious trouble with at that run was getting started again after the first fall. I couldnt bring myself to dive straight down it so I wanted to start "hopping" back and forth. I would have preferred to go diagonal across the thing but there were a lot of people and I didnt want to be in their way. So I got to the side and started trying the "hopping" left and right. My skis are 186cm BBRs and 2kg plus bindings each. Not super heavy but that nose just kept whipping around and getting in each others way, so I continued to trip myself up. I love skiing these skis but in that same situation again I would prefer something lighter and shorter with less of a nose on it. Whats great about the BBRs for me is that they are super stable, hold on great on ice, fast and when you learn to use just the edges for carving its just fantastic. They get so fast and smooth carving, but on the other hand thats when I get to far from my family and its about spending time on the slopes with them.

I just bought 2015 Volkl RTM Jr for both daughters. $79 used in perfect condition with bindings!!! Bargain! BTW that was at banhoff if you need the same deal. My wife tells me she things Volkl are the best out there and maybe they are but I am seeing lots of great talk about Blizzard, Elan and Kastle as well.

One thing thats been eating at me is the length. I see lots of guys my size skiing over 190. Probably they are better than me and are bombing down the hill. I love to turn and enjoy the Gs of turning large fast turns and when I get to a steep area with lots of uneven terrain I dont want to have skis that resist picking my way through. Like on Mozart last year. You get near the bottom and there is this steep bowl looking area with lots of bumps (not made of snow but of land) that you need to navigate at a slower speed. Skis at 190 would be a problem for me there. Then, I head over to a British forum and all the guys my size are running 175 or even 170. I was a bit perplexed.

I guess thats a good and confusing start but now you know how I feel! Oh, my boots are Lange XT 120. I love them. They are quite tight and thats they way I like it. I like to feel like my feet are the ski.

Uriah

 

Just my $0.02 but you should KEEP YOUR SKIS ON!  Walking down a steep icy slope in ski boots carrying your gear is a great way to get seriously injured or to hurt someone else or worse.  Lessons can give you a few tools to practice for those "oh shit" moments.  These techniques can save your bacon and also make you more confident when you are exploring or pushing yourself.


Learning to side slip used to be a basic skill taught early when I learned decades ago.  Definitely worth learning before venturing off green trails out west.  Never know when even a blue has a short section that's steeper than you expected.

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi Folks

Thanks a lot for all the input.

I'll be taking lessons at ABasin. I think I'll buy 2 of the 4 pack lessons. I'll take 2 of them and let my daughters take the other 6. I think my wife has no desire to get better and since she doesn't and isn't inclined to ski black diamonds then really there might not be a lot of reason for her to take lessons. She has fun as it is.

 

I'll take this tidbit with me to lessons because I think you've hit it on the head "If I'm reading this right, it also sounds like a solid down-the-hill pole plant, some balancing drills and some upper/lower body separation work could go a long way towards fixing what went wrong." 

 

I agree about walking down the hill with skis. I would have been as annoying as a snowboarder laying in the middle of the hill contemplating the clouds. I was near the left side of the hill so I walked down through the trees.

 

Marznc, I had assessed myself as being a solid 5 with some 6 skills and that Alta page confirms that. Also, in regards to your sideslip post... My first time out west skiing I learned the sideslip technique on some rentals. It was the coolest thing at the time. If I was feeling leery about a hill and there were dozens of people on it I could keep to the side and slide down. Sweet! With the BBRs I havent been able to sideslip. I dont know if the edges are just so much sharper than the rentals or if its the ski shape or if I just forgot how to do it but yeah I agree and I was trying like heck to get the BBRs to slip down the side of that hill I had trouble on. The sides kept engaging. I've watched a youtube on sideslipping. I'll watch again and try to file that away for the hill.

 

I found a shop near Keystone, golf and ski shop, that says they will be renting Elan skis this season. Ive been wanting to try out some Amphibios and they have the Supernaturals and say they will have some version of Amphibio by the time I get there. 40 bucks a day. Not too bad. I read lots of great reviews here about Volkl RTM 84, several Blizzards, etc but I think something like an Amphibio or Morpheo is more my level at the moment. Or maybe a shorter Kastle MX. I think I might be too heavy for a LX. Anyway, I'll hold off a purchase until later this season and especially til after I rent and take some lessons.

 

As an aside... My Lange's required a lot of experimentation shimming dense cardboard under the heel to raise it enough so that I wasnt cutting off circulation by pressing on that vein thats right under the inside ankle bone. Finally got it right but the left foot was still quite uncomfortable in the toebox and the left side of the left foot was getting quite compressed. Think I damaged a nerve because now there is a numb spot under one of my toes. So this year I ordered a pair of ZipFits from EVO. Closeouts. 220usd. Well, they sent me a 29.5 and a 28.5 both different models. WTH?! By the time I called to explain (immediately) they were out of 29.5 and couldn't order any more. Well, I called ZipFit's US distributor and he made me a wonderful offer for a new pair after telling me they haven't dealt with EVO for about 3 years. Before I took him up on it I called EVO back and asked them if they would sell me just the one boot. I know its a bit hillbilly but the ZipFit fixed my left foot problem and didnt help my right at all which feels great in the original Lange liner. Evo agreed to sell me the single liner (what were they going to do? Keep a liner they cant sell anyway?) and told me to keep the pair for half what I paid. Not too shabby. Was hoping for $50 but it solves the foot problem for $100 I'm pretty pleased.

 

Thanks to all of you for your help. I'll take your advice.

Uriah

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by udailey View Post
 

Hi Folks

Thanks a lot for all the input.

I'll be taking lessons at ABasin. I think I'll buy 2 of the 4 pack lessons. I'll take 2 of them and let my daughters take the other 6. I think my wife has no desire to get better and since she doesn't and isn't inclined to ski black diamonds then really there might not be a lot of reason for her to take lessons. She has fun as it is.

 

I'll take this tidbit with me to lessons because I think you've hit it on the head "If I'm reading this right, it also sounds like a solid down-the-hill pole plant, some balancing drills and some upper/lower body separation work could go a long way towards fixing what went wrong." 

 

I agree about walking down the hill with skis. I would have been as annoying as a snowboarder laying in the middle of the hill contemplating the clouds. I was near the left side of the hill so I walked down through the trees.

 

Marznc, I had assessed myself as being a solid 5 with some 6 skills and that Alta page confirms that. Also, in regards to your sideslip post... My first time out west skiing I learned the sideslip technique on some rentals. It was the coolest thing at the time. If I was feeling leery about a hill and there were dozens of people on it I could keep to the side and slide down. Sweet! With the BBRs I havent been able to sideslip. I dont know if the edges are just so much sharper than the rentals or if its the ski shape or if I just forgot how to do it but yeah I agree and I was trying like heck to get the BBRs to slip down the side of that hill I had trouble on. The sides kept engaging. I've watched a youtube on sideslipping. I'll watch again and try to file that away for the hill.

 

[snip]

 

Thanks to all of you for your help. I'll take your advice.

Uriah

When you have a lesson, see if you can get the instructor to show you how to do a kick turn.  Another useful survival skill for really steep sections where side slipping doesn't feel like a good idea.

 

As for any issues with a side slip, now you can understand why it's good to practice skills on blue or even green terrain.  While practicing a side slip is easier when there is more pitch, it can be done on a relatively mellow slope.

 

Have a good trip!

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

When you have a lesson, see if you can get the instructor to show you how to do a kick turn.  Another useful survival skill for really steep sections where side slipping doesn't feel like a good idea.

 

As for any issues with a side slip, now you can understand why it's good to practice skills on blue or even green terrain.  While practicing a side slip is easier when there is more pitch, it can be done on a relatively mellow slope.

 

Have a good trip!

 

When you are waiting for your wife (not if :D) you should do 3 or 4 kick turns.  If you practice them EVERY time you are skiing, you'll be more confident when you need them.  I think they are an essential survival skill and I'm certain they have saved me from disaster many times.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

Cool. Found a YouTube on kick turns.

post #13 of 14

They are a bit different on AT or Teli gear than alpine gear so make sure you are watching a video of a skier with his or her heels fixed.

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
So we're here. Skied yesterday and today. Yesterday at keystone and today at A-Basin.
Im over the moon about A-Basin. Best day skiing ever my wife says. My top 2 or 3 simply cuz I wish the kids weren't in ski school but skiing with us.
3 inches of powder this morning and my skis tore it up. So fun. The powder was really forgiving. I definitely enjoyed my Salomon's today. Until I get better I may need a smaller, lighter ski for steep and crusty/icy terrain.
Looking at 5-8 inches tomorrow so we're all excited. What fun. A-Basin is just a blast. My girls each lucked out with individual instruction at ski school today. Both ended up on runs I didn't expect. My 5 yr old headed down Wrangler and Sundance with her instructor. Wow was I proud! Those runs can get steep. The 9 year old skied some trees, Sundance, Wrangler and a blue I dont recall. Wife and I skied those as well as Lenawee's Face. Really fast skiing and just a whole new level of fun for us.
Hope yall are enjoying yourselvesas well. What a blast.
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