or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › Colorado Skiing. Everything you need to know (Almost). 2015/6
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Colorado Skiing. Everything you need to know (Almost). 2015/6

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 14

Colorado: Everything you need to know (if you rely on CNN articles written by Europeans for local ski information). 

 

Personally, I only rely on CNN ski articles when they're republished from Forbes. Forbes is the real deal. 

post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post
 

Colorado: Everything you need to know (if you rely on CNN articles written by Europeans for local ski information). 

 

Personally, I only rely on CNN ski articles when they're republished from Forbes. Forbes is the real deal. 

 

Yeah. I'm struggling to find the "insider" part of that writeup. Eating at on-mountain restaurants is what all the locals do...

post #4 of 14
It is advertising for overcrowded and overpriced Colorado ski destinations. It is all good, these kind of articles bring tourists to Colorado and help with your revenue and infrastucture upkeep. I do not see any tourists from Europe heading to Wolf Creek where nearest lodging is 20 miles away. So, no worries - let them go to Vail.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by goranmilos View Post

It is advertising for overcrowded and overpriced Colorado ski destinations. It is all good, these kind of articles bring tourists to Colorado and help with your revenue and infrastucture upkeep. I do not see any tourists from Europe heading to Wolf Creek where nearest lodging is 20 miles away. So, no worries - let them go to Vail.

 

Sure, let them go to Vail, and Aspen, and Steamboat, and Breck, and Telluride, which I would expect at least 80% of destination skiers to be interested in.

 

Sure, there are a bunch of us that love Loveland, A-Basin, Wolf, etc., but I don't expect a whole lot of people to fly across the world to ski them.

 

My point is that even at the places mentioned, there is nothing "insider" about the list. There is almost nothing about where to ski at these various places, and the recommendations for where to sleep and eat reflect no local knowledge. You could build the same list of out Tripadvisor, which is exactly what I suspect they did.

 

Of the places mentioned, I am most familiar with Aspen.  Save for the Belly Up, there is nothing that even comes within the same universe as anywhere I would consider as a "locals" hangout, and the Belly Up is less a locals places and more of an institution. My brother has been a Snowmass Village local for 11 years. I spent a few years living just outside the valley too, and thus eating all up and down the Roaring Fork. The Belly Up and Hotel Jerome I've had a drink at, nothing else on that list.

 

I think Ski Magazine has done a better job at providing "insider" information, in that Ski Magazine provides no information not vetted by the resort (and definitely not "insider") but at least they give you the impression that somebody actually stepped foot in this overpriced, orverbuilt, and overmarketed resort appendages.

post #6 of 14

Do you know for a fact that Ski works with the resort on information or are you just spitballing? 

 

Ski mag is useless either way, but that would really cross a line (i.e. only including info about eateries, hotels and businesses the resort is pushing). 

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post
 

Do you know for a fact that Ski works with the resort on information or are you just spitballing? 

 

Ski mag is useless either way, but that would really cross a line (i.e. only including info about eateries, hotels and businesses the resort is pushing). 

 

Nope. I don't know that at all. I do know quite a lot of Ski Magazine has the appearance of coming straight from the resort PR directors fingertips, nicely coordinated with resort advertising on adjoining pages. 

 

If I had to guess, and guess it is, Ski Magazine asks for (or is just sent as a matter of course) press releases on improvements and amenities and whatever else the resort wants to push. Ski Magazine then writes feature articles about these improvements and amenities, with enough color that it usually looks like somebody went there. Whether they did or not, who knows. Ski Magazine then presents the feature article to the resort and opens negotiation on how many pages of advertising the resort is going to buy in Ski Magazine that year. Its how I would do it, and even if the resort doesn't pony up enough, the article can basically sit on the shelf for a few years and be run at any point with minor updates. It fits the general fawning lapdog attitude Ski Magazine takes to virtually every resort- nary a whiff of criticism, and writing that looks a lot like marketing department copy. But why not? They aren't lying about anything, they are simply selling glamour in a way that appeals to their readers and the resorts that pay for ads. It isn't like they have some reputation for journalistic integrity to protect. 

 

My point is that this "insiders guide" to me seems less credible than Ski Magazine, and that is one low bar.

post #8 of 14

It's a fluff piece, but I didn't see anything blatantly wrong.

Cantina's closed, but that was pretty recent.

 

I like the fire pit.

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

Nope. I don't know that at all. I do know quite a lot of Ski Magazine has the appearance of coming straight from the resort PR directors fingertips, nicely coordinated with resort advertising on adjoining pages. 

 

If I had to guess, and guess it is, Ski Magazine asks for (or is just sent as a matter of course) press releases on improvements and amenities and whatever else the resort wants to push. Ski Magazine then writes feature articles about these improvements and amenities, with enough color that it usually looks like somebody went there. Whether they did or not, who knows. Ski Magazine then presents the feature article to the resort and opens negotiation on how many pages of advertising the resort is going to buy in Ski Magazine that year. Its how I would do it, and even if the resort doesn't pony up enough, the article can basically sit on the shelf for a few years and be run at any point with minor updates. It fits the general fawning lapdog attitude Ski Magazine takes to virtually every resort- nary a whiff of criticism, and writing that looks a lot like marketing department copy. But why not? They aren't lying about anything, they are simply selling glamour in a way that appeals to their readers and the resorts that pay for ads. It isn't like they have some reputation for journalistic integrity to protect. 

 

My point is that this "insiders guide" to me seems less credible than Ski Magazine, and that is one low bar.

If they do actually do that, they ought to shutter the magazine. 

 

Nothing wrong with getting resort info about improvements and such, but bringing the article into ad negotiations basically violates even the loosest interpretation of journalistic integrity. 

 

Not saying it doesn't happen where coverage is used as leverage to sell ads, especially with advertorial fluff like Ski, but it shouldn't ever happen that explicitly. 

 

Anyway, that CNN article is definitely garbage. Occasionally, there's a decent mainstream media article on resorts or skiing in general, but usually they're the worst of the worst and definitely the only things that makes Ski look like a skiing magazine. 

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post
 

If they do actually do that, they ought to shutter the magazine. 

 

Nothing wrong with getting resort info about improvements and such, but bringing the article into ad negotiations basically violates even the loosest interpretation of journalistic integrity. 

 

Not saying it doesn't happen where coverage is used as leverage to sell ads, especially with advertorial fluff like Ski, but it shouldn't ever happen that explicitly. 

 

Anyway, that CNN article is definitely garbage. Occasionally, there's a decent mainstream media article on resorts or skiing in general, but usually they're the worst of the worst and definitely the only things that makes Ski look like a skiing magazine. 

 

Agreed on all but the shuttering of the magazine. I think if you shuttered Ski Magazine for actions that looked like the above, you'd shutter quite a lot of leisure time/hobby magazines that are totally captured by whatever manufacturers and/or service providers dominate the industry. The magazines need the ad revenue to continue existing, and they need to continue to exist to be showered with the free goods, services, and press junkets. The result is almost no objectivity and no willingness to criticize. Would it be better if the mags were objective and not afraid to speak their mind? Sure, but that's not the environment I see. I think everyone can make their own choice as to whether a particular mag is worth buying. For Ski Magazine, no, I'm not giving any money for it, but I usually get it from a ski movie or something, and I'll flip through it and look at pretty pictures while shaking my head at the ridiculousness of the writing.

 

I also like most of the Forbes articles. 

post #11 of 14

I largely agree, but I draw the line at blatant disregard of basic ethics (having one person bring an advertorial fluff piece to the marketing meeting). All hypothetical, I know.

 

Magazines like Ski can get by without any hard-hitting, objective journalism. Imo, they're actually better off that way. Skiing is really a fun hobby, and I'll bet the wealthy, casual skiers in Ski's demographic don't want any preachy exposes. Neither do I, really; I used to like "Outside" a lot more before it began fancying itself as TIME magazine for the outdoors. Now I rarely have any desire to pick it up, save for the free copies at OR. 

post #12 of 14
the best thread ever !!! We all agree !!!

It took CNN article on skiing to makes us realize we are not that much apart. Thanks CNN !
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post
 

I largely agree, but I draw the line at blatant disregard of basic ethics (having one person bring an advertorial fluff piece to the marketing meeting). All hypothetical, I know.

 

Magazines like Ski can get by without any hard-hitting, objective journalism. Imo, they're actually better off that way. Skiing is really a fun hobby, and I'll bet the wealthy, casual skiers in Ski's demographic don't want any preachy exposes. Neither do I, really; I used to like "Outside" a lot more before it began fancying itself as TIME magazine for the outdoors. Now I rarely have any desire to pick it up, save for the free copies at OR. 

 

I like Mountain.

 

http://www.mountainonline.com/category/ski/

post #14 of 14
Lol, I literally typed "Mountain" into my last post, then deleted it. I agree, Mountain's one of my faves.

The reason I deleted it is because I was trying to figure out why I like it so much better than Outside. Mountain does its own share of tangential, barely outdoor-related content. I think it's because it stays focused on the US mountain region and doesn't try to be a cross between the Nat Geo Channel and GQ. Also, it doesn't contribute to the greater dumbing down of the media with crap like "hot chick/celebrity dude athlete of the week" or "viral Web content that has absolutely nothing to do with the outdoors as constructed in our mission."

Yeah, I really think Outside blows. It tried jumping the shark, landed on it accidentally, went into a coma, woke up with a partially functioning brain, then got back to making magazines.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Resorts, Conditions & Travel
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › Colorado Skiing. Everything you need to know (Almost). 2015/6