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Dalbello boot confusion

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

So, last year i demo-ed at ski shop in Mammoth the 2015 boots Dalbello, KR 2 Chakra ID, in mondo 23.5.

They felt great for the first 4 hours of skiing, but at the end of the day i did feel i would like something just a tad bigger, based on some minor numbness.

I went home and purchased online (big mistake) the 2014 version of the Dalbello KR 2 Chakra in mondo 24. They were way too big! Not wanting to give up, I tried to fit them with inserts, thicker socks, buckled them tighter, etc, and took them to the slopes, and nope, waaaay to loose. Can't return them now, since worn, but oh, well..

So, now i decided to just go and buy the same boots that i demo-ed. I figured i can't go wrong. So i ordered 2015 Dalbello, KR 2 Chakra ID from REI in the very same size as i demo-ed : mondo 23.5. I got them, and tried them on at home and my feet are going numb within 10 min of wearing them in the house. I don't understand, they feel way too small. How can this be, the same exact boot, with the same exact socks, verified that the size is marked correctly... Very confused on what to do...Any thoughts?

post #2 of 16
Welcome to EpicSki. This is actually pretty simple. What you should have done when you first demoed the boots was to have their boot fitter fix the problem. Buying the next larger size wasn't the answer, as you found. What you need to do now is take the boots to a qualified and knowledgable boot fitter and get them fixed. If you skied in demo boots at Mammoth, those boots may have been used quite a few times which caused the liners to pack out some. The boots you now have are brand new and so the liners haven't had a chance to pack out nor ahve the Intuition liners been molded to your feet. Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis about fitting and terminology so you understand somewhat how boots should fit. Then check the "Who's Who" for a fitter near you. If there isn't one listed, tell us where you live and someone will probably be able to recommend a fitter.

And, remember, never buy skis boots online.
post #3 of 16

The liners will pack out, so the brand new boots are slightly tighter than the demo ones you used that have been worn.  So with some wear, potentially they will pack out and be the same as what you demoed.  

 

But, I would say you may need to go to a bootfitter to help you customize your boots.  I did a quick google and those boots have a thermoliner, so they can do the thermo-mold the lining which should better fit to your feet.  I suppose there are probably some DIY articles involving your oven and/or hairdryer  if you want to do this yourself, but you could mess things up.

 

If your feet are getting numb, you can't ski at all.  

In general you may need to find the exact blood vessel that is too tight and causing the numbness and get more space there.  What socks are you using?  Perhaps you need to go with sheer/ultrathin socks or pantyhose style socks to get more space.

 

Are the buckles as loose as possible at all?  Potentially you can adjust and move them over.  

Otherwise, if you still don't want to visit a bootfitter, you may need to resign yourself to unbuckling on the lift rides up to restore blood flow then buckling just for each run, until the boots pack out.

post #4 of 16

If you decide to get boot work done, I had good experience with Zach at Footloose in Mammoth. He seemed willing to listen to my concern and worked on my boots. I think I'm DONE but I need a few more trips to really know.

Be wary though, I heard another boot guy in there basically tell another woman that she "pretty much didn't know what she was talking about" speech. Then an older guy(I think the owner, maybe Zach's dad??) told the boot guy to try a different boot because the one he "picked" out probably wasn't the right one for the gal to try on in the first place. :duel:

 

I left the store so I don't know that outcome though...

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys, it makes sense. I will try to work with a boot fitter. I am in Orange County area of California. If anyone has a recommendation for a boot fitter in the general area that can help me get these liners and boots modified not to kill my feet, that would be super useful. Thank you !
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julia Garcia View Post

Thanks guys, it makes sense. I will try to work with a boot fitter. I am in Orange County area of California. If anyone has a recommendation for a boot fitter in the general area that can help me get these liners and boots modified not to kill my feet, that would be super useful. Thank you !


Have you had the liners molded yet? Custom footbeds mebee? Sorry I can't make a shop rec, but you might want to call around and make sure the shop/fitter you're going to has experience molding ID (Intuition) liners. Most shops/fitters should, and I'd be wary of any that don't.

 

FWIW, ID/Intuition liners will break in/mold on their own eventually just by skiing them, but you could waste a good number of days on numb feet before that happens.

post #7 of 16

Here's one "post" from another link worth reading

 

 

This is an old thread.  But, I wish I had seen it earlier.  I bought boots from Claude - full fitting, his recommended boots, custom footbeds - top to bottom his recommendation in March 2013.  From day one, I said that I thought they were too big.  He assured me they weren't.  The first time I went back (after about 8 days) he added heel pads.  The second time I went back (Feb 2014) he added material under the footbeds.  In fairness to him, he offers a 12 month guarantee and due to a death in my family my season ended in the beginning of March.  In December 2014, I still had the same problem - popping out of the heel cup.  I went back in January.  In his words - "this is the last thing we will be doing."  He also said that my foot was the problem - overly mobile, which he had never mentioned previously.  He insisted the boot was the right fit.  He added yet more padding - heels and instep.  I just returned from the most interesting week in Utah.  I learned to ski my boot really loose because any buckle tightening put me into "through the roof" crying in the lodge type of pain.  I also learned that by skiing really aggressively, I could ski myself back into the heel cup. However, I didn't risk skiing  any serious stuff.

 

Oh ... I forgot the motto posted on the wall of Skinet Sports   ... "If you don't love it, you don't own it."  I went back 3 times because I didn't love it, but apparently ... I own it anyway.  Everytime, I had the same complaint - heel and ankle was too loose.

 

$1000.00 wasted.  I could have fit myself better online.  Luckily, Kevin from Footloose just relocated to Encinitas,Ca.  I trusted Claude, though, so now I'm skeptical of boot fitters period.

 

 

I went there(Skinet) too. He KNOWS his stuff but talk/see him first to make sure YOU feel comfortable. If I was able, I would go to Footloose and perhaps Zach or someone else there that you feel good with. I think you have one year to go back/forth to "adjust" boots 

 

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

Yeah, i didn't want to do my custom fitting via Footloose, since i am only in Mammoth once a year for 4 days of skiing. I need to work with a shop closer to me.

I just talked to Skinet guy. I was trying to find out how much he will charge me for boot fitting, he pretty much said that first i have to buy from them custom orthotics for $200-something, then, if i didn't buy their boots, they would charge me $100 for liner molding, then $50 per half an hour of boot work, which he could not estimate how many of those would be needed to get my boots right. So, it seems that they really want you to buy the boots from them, for, no doubt, triple the price...

On the other hand, it seems that REI does liner molding, so i guess i will start there. Thank you for the info

post #9 of 16

Good Luck on the boots. It's too bad this part of skiing has to suck so bad :mad

post #10 of 16
It sounds like price is an issue for you. So yes start with liner molding.

Then instead of a custom foodbed there are off the shelf trim to fit ones that are $30 to $50.

There are a few theads here but
Superfeet is trim to fit. And then there is
Sole footbed is semi moldable using an oven or will also wearmold.
Both available at rei too.

It depends on your specific needs what which of these is better for you, I prefer sole. Search for threads to get more background
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lott42 View Post

Good Luck on the boots. It's too bad this part of skiing has to suck so bad mad.gif
The key is it didnt have to suck if the sticky advice was followed and cash was plunked down at a bootfitter.
Its just that the thrifty way only works if your feet are lucky enough to fit the standard mold exactly.

Its like buying clothes online, but not casual clothes, but formal wear. The chances that a suit or dress just fits you well off the rack is slim. Alterations from a tailor also rack up pretty fast and can match the cost of the item.
Edited by raytseng - 10/28/15 at 6:48pm
post #12 of 16

Some things to be aware of if you go to REI to get the liners molded.

1.  Make sure they put a toe cup on each foot.  This gives you a bit more wiggle room for your toes, reduces the chance of them getting numb and/or cold.

2.  If you have any odd bumps on your feet, make them put sticky backed dense foam pads on those spots.

3.  Wear only ultra light(very thin) socks (at least 50% merino wool) for the molding process and also for skiing.  Fits and Point 6 ultra lights are the best I've found and I've tried a lot of brands.

4.  I've found that Foot Balance makes better insoles for use in ski boots than Superfeet or Sole.  The reason is that they mold better.  Form is a relatively new moldable footbed that is also pretty good.  Unfortunately I think REI only carries Superfeet and Sole.  Whatever brand you buy make sure the arch support is the right height for your feet and in the correct location front to back.

If REI can't do 1 and 2, you really need to find someone who can.

post #13 of 16
Mtcyclst im checking out foot balance as I put insoles in all my footwear. was your experience with the quick fit or for the instore custom fit? Do you have any insight regarding pricing?
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

Mtcyclst im checking out foot balance as I put insoles in all my footwear. was your experience with the quick fit or for the instore custom fit? Do you have any insight regarding pricing?

Have tried both.  We had some problems last year with the heating devise and ruined a few pairs of the custom ones.  The custom ones are OK, not as good as the Sidas ones we use.  Most of my experience is with the Quick Fit, I have them in my backpacking boots, both pairs of light hiking boots and a pair of approach shoes.

post #15 of 16

Good luck finding a good fitter in the greater Los Angeles area. Been there, done that. Not worth it. At the very least cross your fingers that the local REI folks can heat and mold your liners competently. Then, hang in there until you can get to Mammoth. And yes, get at least some Superfeet insoles in there.

post #16 of 16

If you go with REI, I think there is a 20% coupon coming up in a few weeks if you need to buy a Superfeet(I like the green one)

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