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New Self Heating Gloves and Insoles - Page 2

post #31 of 40

^^^ It is hooey, and blast from the past, just like an aura. "...multiple frequencies and information." Uh huh. 

post #32 of 40

Hell, if Luke can feel the hooey, perhaps these guy have found a way too. 

post #33 of 40

The human body effects the magnetic field around it, just ask any shark; sharks use electromagnetic sensors (and I don't mean just their eyes) to help them bite down on their prey.  That being said, the energy released is negligible.  Like has been said before it won't move a compass needle, let along create heat.

 

As to the reflective liner, sure, but there is nothing new there.  

 

You would be warmer with a good pair of mittens.

post #34 of 40

I think what Zondo hopes to imply in their marketing by using Nano is that they can magically convert EM to heat.

 

Now, I won't say that's impossible, I just haven't a feel if using some "nano" structure as a resonator to convert EM to heat can be done, and if so, the amount of energy amounts to much. Then adding a reflective element for lost heat .. above that by any insulative effect makes em great. That and moving heat to the fingers may be a 4th element of their gloves

 

My opinion is that the later three are already present in a lot of well proven products, my gut feeling is that first, EM to heat will be very little. I'd venture to guess that mechanical heat would be far easier method (eg, slapping hands together) or plugging your pole grip with a head pack or two.

 

In terms of the OP, at $40 a pair, why not just give em a shot as if they're well built may be as good as any other product and maybe better, but perhaps not the magical heat convertor marketed.

 

Now, if they really want some money, they can propose their design to DARPA and get a big pile of cash and start designing all kinds of undergarments for the Military and NASA and then commercialize it. I'd suspect the market could be easier started with an order or two from the military and then as many have done, sell to us needy civilians ....

 

 

:)

post #35 of 40
Thread Starter 

Just to clarify by the way the $40 number keeps getting thrown out because of my post. That was using the Kickstarter pledge amount, I imagine once they go on sale the price scheme will be different as is usually the case with Kickstarters. So if judging the value based on cost alone, you may want to dig deeper because I imagine it might be more now that the Kickstarter is completed. 

post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

I assume the blue fingers photo is taken after not wearing gloves and the red fingers photo is taken after 30 minutes in the miracle glove.

What about a set of before and after photos of the warming effects of regular ski glove for comparison purpose. 

The wall behind her got warming too!  Those are some gloves!

post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

The wall behind her got warming too!  Those are some gloves!

 

Yeah, as well as her torso.  I'm sure somewhere there's really, really, really, super tiny print that says "Disclaimer : In addition to putting on the gloves, she also turned on the furnace."

post #38 of 40

 This ad contains two claims.  I'll address each in turn.

 

1) Gold-titanium IR (infrared) reflector:  There are four ways the body can lose heat: evaporation (typically via perspiration), conduction, convection, and radiation (via IR emission).  Our bodies, being warm, do emit a significant amount of IR, and reflecting IR to reduce radiative heat loss (like the Omni-heat liners mentioned above by slider and DanoT in the Columbia jackets) is legitimate tech, at least in principle.   However, I'm agnostic on how much this actually improves the warmth of insulated clothing under real-world conditions, both because I don't know how significant radiative cooling is vs. other mechanisms, and I don't know how much the reflective layer reduces radiative cooling.  For instance, if you didn't have the reflective layer, much of your body's IR wouldn't go directly into space, it would be absorbed by the insulated clothing, which would warm the clothing, which would warm you.  So a lot of it might be effectively captured even without a reflective layer (it thus makes most sense with thinner clothing, which would be more transparent to IR).  In addition, even if the tech is effective, we have no idea if they've implemented it properly.  Incorporating an effective IR reflector into textiles is challenging. For instance, even with a generally reputable company, like Columbia, the actual gain provided by their implementation is minimal (see http://www.academia.edu/8021591/Development_of_thermal_insulating_textiles_this_thesis_contains_the_steps_for_developing_an_innovative_IR_reflective_spacer_material).   And, given that reflective IR tech is difficult to implement in clothing,  I certainly wouldn't trust a company that makes the second (ridiculous) claim, below, to get it right.

 

2) Low frequency EM reflector:  The claim is that our bodies emit EM at improbably low wavelengths (Cantunamuch clearly described just how ridiculously low these are) and that, if these could be reflected back to us, they would somehow have a physiological effect that would cause the blood vessels in our hands to dilate. This is completely ridiculous.  [Or to be more precise, it's an extraordinarily implausible claim, and, as the saying goes, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, and they've presented none.]   Except on the planet Zondo, where I'm sure it works perfectly.

 

I will give them the benefit of the doubt and assume the storage clip and pull-on wrist tab work correctly.

 

Somewhat unrelatedly, the mention of metal makes me wonder if embedding a heat-condutive layer (typically the opposite of what you want in a glove), that stretches from the palm to the fingers, right against the skin, might help with cold fingers in people with poor circulation by conducting heat out from the palms.   Just a thought.  


Edited by chemist - 11/4/15 at 7:33pm
post #39 of 40

Chemist,

 

Your post reminded me of why I no longer buy eggs containing Omega 3. I have been told that the amount of Omega 3 in a couple of eggs is not enough to have any effect on your body or health so I was paying extra for no real world benefit, although the eggs do contain Omega 3.

post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

Chemist,

 

Your post reminded me of why I no longer buy eggs containing Omega 3. I have been told that the amount of Omega 3 in a couple of eggs is not enough to have any effect on your body or health so I was paying extra for no real world benefit, although the eggs do contain Omega 3.


That brings back memories.  Thirty years ago, when I was at NIH, I collaborated on a project to see how much the ω-3 levels in eggs could be increased by feeding hens fish oil and other high ω-3 diets.  Very different from what I do now.  

 

My personal preference is to eat eggs from chickens that have been truly pasture-raised, and get a significant amount of their diet from weeds, grubs, etc. instead of just from feed.  This gives a healthier chicken, and also increases their levels of a mix of beneficial fatty acids (since weeds and insects are often high in ω-3 and ω-9).   But like you said, paying extra for eggs from chickens just because their feed has been fortified with ω-3 probably doesn't make sense -- their are better ways to get more ω-3 in your diet.

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