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Flooring for entryway into Ski House

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

I need to install some sort of protective flooring or mats in an entry way from slopes into the house. I have looked into Weathertech flooring and similar. Does anyone have any good ideas or pics of what they have done? The entry room is not a garage, but a pretty nice "gameroom"/bar area, so i'd like it to be decent looking.

Thanks, PC POW

 

Mod note: moved to General Skiing

post #2 of 27

I'd suggest rubber floor tiles that look like brick. You can either buy them in sheets that have the brick pattern, or you can buy individual rubber bricks to lay down. Rubber is non slip, water resistant, and will not get dinged by hard plastic boots. 

 

 

 

Or if brick isn't your thing, there are these:

 

post #3 of 27

I used Cork throughout, for my condo.  It looks really nice and has held up really well for three years so far.

post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

I used Cork throughout, for my condo.  It looks really nice and has held up really well for three years so far.

I'm not in the market for flooring, but that is interesting.  I didn't realize it was durable.

post #5 of 27

My girlfriend had her basement finished into a more livable space four years ago, and had hardwood floors put down...

 

*

*

 

In the interim a few runs of the flooring in front of the door on the right, (where the dogs go out to the back yard and back in several times a day), have buckled up pretty badly and are going to have to be replaced. I was surprised the flooring is not tongue-and-groove; it's just flat nailed. I don't suppose that helped, but I believe the main problem is just residual moisture that came in through the open door and worked it's way in over time. The rest of the floor is fine, and it doesn't appear the sub-floor or sleepers below the afflicted area have buckled, although need to investigate that more to verify we don't have a more extensive problem.

 

Anyway, we've been thinking about what to do to fix the problem and prevent a re-occurrence. Have considered cutting out the flooring and installing tile in front of the entire door area, (something like a fireplace hearth), and maybe running a dehumidifier during rainy times.

 

Some of the material suggestions in this thread are interesting - we'll have to look into them as well.

post #6 of 27

A couple of sources for rubber flooring.  Been installed in many a ski resort.

 

http://regupol.com/

 

http://www.diamond-safety.com/

 

Equine-Photo

post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

My girlfriend had her basement finished into a more livable space four years ago, and had hardwood floors put down...

 

*

*

 

In the interim a few runs of the flooring in front of the door on the right, (where the dogs go out to the back yard and back in several times a day), have buckled up pretty badly and are going to have to be replaced. I was surprised the flooring is not tongue-and-groove; it's just flat nailed. I don't suppose that helped, but I believe the main problem is just residual moisture that came in through the open door and worked it's way in over time. The rest of the floor is fine, and it doesn't appear the sub-floor or sleepers below the afflicted area have buckled, although need to investigate that more to verify we don't have a more extensive problem.

 

Anyway, we've been thinking about what to do to fix the problem and prevent a re-occurrence. Have considered cutting out the flooring and installing tile in front of the entire door area, (something like a fireplace hearth), and maybe running a dehumidifier during rainy times.

 

Some of the material suggestions in this thread are interesting - we'll have to look into them as well.

 

I think we need to keep in mind that the OP is looking for "protective" type flooring to go into an entry that comes from "slopes into house". That tells us that they will be entering and exiting in ski boots, and therefore tracking snow in fairly regularly. IMHO, that pretty much discounts hardwood or other such things. As mentioned, hardwood buckles when exposed to moisture. Hardwood and cork will both get damaged from regular traffic from hard plastic ski boots. Also, harder surfaces like tile and hardwood are just awful for walking on in ski boots. Hard plastic soles plus hard floors means just about zero traction. Add some water and snow to the mix, and you've got a ready made slip and fall factory. 

post #8 of 27

We were thinking whatever we ended up doing we would have an all-weather area rug down by the entry anyway, (to catch mud, etc the dogs would track in), but yea, for in and out in ski boots a durable, moisture proof (or at least resistant) material that provided traction would seem to be the way to go.

 

Good suggestions in this thread!   Thumbs Up

post #9 of 27

Look for "WaterHog" rugs ... tough as they get and good looking, too. Used at our ski club which has a lot more traffic than a house.

post #10 of 27

We've had one of those (or something similar) in place. Good for traction and some weatherproofing, but obviously not enough to keep moisture from getting into hardwood flooring. If the latter isn't an issue agree could be a good choice for an entryway.

post #11 of 27

... they are solid rubber (or something like that) backed and absolutely nothing comes thru them. They are even havea bit of a "dam" on the edges. We have them over concrete and they are so impermeable that the concrete will occasionally "sweat" underneath them. The real thing is the real deal.

post #12 of 27
I've got a similar situation. I couldn't find anything that I liked and was low maintenance so instead opted for quality porcelain tile with a protective area rug throw down along with a bench for disassemblage. Good porcelain is tough and low maintenance unlike ceramic and there are textures that hide the dirt.

post #13 of 27

Take a look at "luxury vinyl tile". They are thick, extremely durable, can be grouted if desired like ceramic tile (with a stainless vinyl grout), and can replicate many looks. (In think the stone styles are usually very good... the wood, maybe not.) When I got mine, one of the demos was to hack at it with a screwdriver, and it didn't leave a mark. "Vinyl" may conjure up a bad image, but they're not like old vinyl or linoleum floors.

 

Here's an example : http://www.armstrong.com/flooring/luxury-vinyl.html

post #14 of 27

I hope to one day have this problem.

post #15 of 27

Maybe a bit off the wall, but there are some "pourable" gym floor type materials. Supposedly super tough. With just a bit of give to them (seems perfect for stomping boots). Just a wild idea as I have only heard about these from others.

post #16 of 27

Unless you are planning on people hanging around and dancing for hours in ski boots, I would put in a floor appropriate for the space and then put a waterhog type carpet or rubber tiles over it. Resale, you know.

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

My girlfriend had her basement finished into a more livable space four years ago, and had hardwood floors put down...

 

.

....... be replaced. I was surprised the flooring is not tongue-and-groove; it's just flat nailed. I don't suppose that helped, but I believe the main problem is just residual moisture that came in through the open door and worked it's way in over time. The rest of the floor is fine, and it doesn't appear the sub-floor or sleepers below the afflicted area have buckled, although need to investigate that more to verify we don't have a more extensive problem.

 

Anyway, we've been thinking about what to do to fix the problem and prevent a re-occurrence. Have considered cutting out the flooring and installing tile in front of the entire door area, (something like a fireplace hearth), and maybe running a dehumidifier during rainy times.

 

Some of the material suggestions in this thread are interesting - we'll have to look into them as well.

 

When I put flooring down I sealed the wood as to minimize or slow down the absorption and expelling of moisture, especially near doors. Tile of course would fix this and given the boards are not tongue and grove will allow for moisture to leach in.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bsather View Post
 

Look for "WaterHog" rugs ... tough as they get and good looking, too. Used at our ski club which has a lot more traffic than a house.

 

agree on the WaterHog rugs. Have a couple and with rubber bottoms, should be waterproof while offering cushion. I'm sure there are others out there making similar. Just ask a manager at a business or two should you see something, too hit the custodial service businesses.

 

If you can't find the cushion needed, or pricing of thick stuff is prohibitive, then you could opt for cork underlayment between a waterproof rug. Cork is sold in various thicknesses and typically in rolls but one outfit sells it in sheets to eliminate warping. Typically in 3, 6, etc mm thicknesses. It can be pricey too. then one can consider other underlayments such as rubber (farm stores usually have it by the foot) and even thick felt at carpet stores.

 

of course that beckons the obvious, hitting an established carpet/flooring store. Most have commercial product that would/could save a lot of expense of replacing damaged floors.

 

then too, if waterproof you will want to move it every so often as to ensure you haven't trapped moisture under it only to find it 4 months later in a black slick mildewed state ...

post #18 of 27

another thought is simply a Pergo type laminate. They're pretty thin, often padded and short of a bucket of water, with a click tongue system effectively waterproof. just cut the edges on a bevel or add a trim finish that I think locks too, then come spring heave ho or store away. They can be slick so you may end up with some type of carpet but maybe all around less costly and less hassle as you can change the look.

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Unless you are planning on people hanging around and dancing for hours in ski boots, I would put in a floor appropriate for the space and then put a waterhog type carpet or rubber tiles over it. Resale, you know.

 

It sounds like this is a ski in/ski out place, meaning that a permanently mounted section of floor that suits the need would be wanted by anybody who ends up buying. I wouldn't suggest doing the whole floor like that, just the section in front of the door/ in the unbooting area. I know I'd prefer that in my slopeside condo rather than a non-ideal floor that I have to turn around and purchase something to put over it. 

 

Edit: presuming, of course, that I would ever have a slopeside condo. Which I don't. Nor will I ever. 

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

It sounds like this is a ski in/ski out place, meaning that a permanently mounted section of floor that suits the need would be wanted by anybody who ends up buying. I wouldn't suggest doing the whole floor like that, just the section in front of the door/ in the unbooting area. I know I'd prefer that in my slopeside condo rather than a non-ideal floor that I have to turn around and purchase something to put over it. 

 

Edit: presuming, of course, that I would ever have a slopeside condo. Which I don't. Nor will I ever. 

Well, to each his own. I would never assume that buyers all want the same thing, because they don't. So I would err on the side of visually appealing, like the porcelain tiles shown earlier. 

 

We have a slopeside place, and we have slate in the entry with a rug. But there are carpeted hallways before we get there, we aren't coming in directly from outside, and some of the snow is knocked off by the time we get to our door. But not all. Those wood-look tiles have really come a long way, too! if you like the look of hardwood, use that. 

post #21 of 27

I have cork floors in my coffee shop and I wouldn't want people walking in ski boots on them. I have those interlocking rubber tiles in my gym floor. They are at least a decade old and see 150+ people per day exercising on them and I can't remember ever having to replace a tile. But water can get under them and won't evaporate at all. So you'll have to pull them up to clean under them if you have a big spill. 

 

I think big solid rubber mat is the best choice. 

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Well, to each his own. I would never assume that buyers all want the same thing, because they don't. So I would err on the side of visually appealing, like the porcelain tiles shown earlier. 

 

We have a slopeside place, and we have slate in the entry with a rug. But there are carpeted hallways before we get there, we aren't coming in directly from outside, and some of the snow is knocked off by the time we get to our door. But not all. Those wood-look tiles have really come a long way, too! if you like the look of hardwood, use that. 

 

I'd have to see it first hand a slope side slate entry for a real opinion ...  if you will ... maybe for a week or two !  ;) 

 

but for nothing too pricey, I'd agree with the rubber mats or Waterhog type of solution as multiple sizes exist. easy to roll up and move when out of season.

post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by pete View Post
 

 

I'd have to see it first hand a slope side slate entry for a real opinion ...  if you will ... maybe for a week or two !  ;) 

 

but for nothing too pricey, I'd agree with the rubber mats or Waterhog type of solution as multiple sizes exist. easy to roll up and move when out of season.

Here, it's not quite firsthand but you can stare at it for many weeks now!  :D  This is from when we were still remodeling, no baseboards and old carpet still, and you can see it is clearly nothing fancy. But it hides  dirt well and isn't slick, either, which might be the case with porcelain. 

 

post #24 of 27
I would use a luxury vinyl plank in that space. Vinyl isn't what but used to be. The plank has an awesome wood look, is super easy to install, forgiving of floor inconsistencies, unaffected by water, very durable and is fairly not slip (a little "rubbery"). You see it in a lot of commercial applications these days.

We just recently did half of our main level in LVT tiles and half in LVT wood look planks. It looks great.
post #25 of 27
Here it is in our living room.

post #26 of 27
Here is a close up of it.

post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL View Post

I would use a luxury vinyl plank in that space. Vinyl isn't what but used to be. The plank has an awesome wood look, is super easy to install, forgiving of floor inconsistencies, unaffected by water, very durable and is fairly not slip (a little "rubbery"). You see it in a lot of commercial applications these days.

We just recently did half of our main level in LVT tiles and half in LVT wood look planks. It looks great.


ah, yes .. had a friend use Vinyl Plank in their basement ... stuff is really really durable. (provided it's from a good source)

 

It also can be a do it yourself project.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Here, it's not quite firsthand but you can stare at it for many weeks now!  :D  This is from when we were still remodeling, no baseboards and old carpet still, and you can see it is clearly nothing fancy. But it hides  dirt well and isn't slick, either, which might be the case with porcelain. 

 

 

 

darn, as usual I have to live vicariously ... that and stalking !

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