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Wintersteiger machines - Page 3

post #61 of 64


The skin tension is lower in the transverse center of the base than at the edges when flexed.

I'll call this the flexed pig belly phenomena and will try to measure it once my skis don't have storage wax on them.

This effect should be bigger for wider skis.

I can't imagine any real skiing situation where you would notice this...

post #62 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post
 


The skin tension is lower in the transverse center of the base than at the edges when flexed.

I'll call this the flexed pig belly phenomena and will try to measure it once my skis don't have storage wax on them.

This effect should be bigger for wider skis.

I can't imagine any real skiing situation where you would notice this...


Wow, this is getting way to deep for me! 

 

One person asked about the cracked edges or whatever they called them.  I had some Hexel Sundance II's that had those edges.  They claimed it helps those super flexy skis to be more flexy.

post #63 of 64

BTW, from Rennstall's website:  "While the Rennstall tune still uses the same state-of-the-art equipment as the Wintersteiger tune, more of the work is done by hand. For example, we take more time to hand-plane the edges of your skis so they are as sharp and smooth as possible."

post #64 of 64
I can answer the cracked edges a bit. Old material engineering didn't know the fine limits of materials so a defined limit was used. Now we know the limits as a result no more cracked edges. A lot of this occurred in the '80s and '90s.

Advancement leads design, design leads advancement cycle.
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