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MA of Mogul Skiing, Part 2

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

It has been a little while since anyone posted MA videos of themselves, just lots of interski videos and words words words. So I thought would put out a follow up post to an MA request I had a few years ago: http://www.epicski.com/t/111234/ma-of-mogul-skiing#post_1448817 (which I got lots of good advice from).

 

Since then I have been working on for and aft moments in the bumps. Below is a recent video of me skiing a blue run last year. It's Mid-Atlantic skier made bumps, so I was intentionally skiing a tight/slippery line just in case a rogue one popped out on me :).

 

 

 

The video from a few years ago in the part 1 thread.

 

 

I am going to be skiing out of Snowbird this year, so hopefully I will actually have videos of steep bump skiing for part 3. Any constructive criticism is helpful.

post #2 of 11
Screw the MA. Tell us about the Snowbird gig.
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Screw the MA. Tell us about the Snowbird gig.

Road trip!!
Ok, probably not. Maybe a bargain plane ticket will pop up.
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Screw the MA. Tell us about the Snowbird gig.


To help you catch up . . . a post from a few weeks ago. :)

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/142301/2015-16-utah-weather-news-conditions-discussion/30#post_1921127

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
 

Believe I'll be skiing quite a bit at Snowbird and Park City this winter.  Maybe we can make a few turns together sometime?  My son moved to SLC last week and got a pass to Snowbird.  My wife and I were out there with him for a few days.  

Photos taken at Snowbird on Sept 30 around 3pm.  The new restaurant bldg is bigger looking from backside.  Fairly mild at summit, good thing because we hadn't planned on going up, but got a free tram ride.  No wind, around 60 degs:  

 LL

LL

LL

 

quittin' time

LL

Taken from Cottonwood Heights on Oct 2, around 5pm, little bit of daytime snowfall in the mtns in upper right of photo.  Just the day before, Oct 1, it was 90 degs in SLC.:eek

LL 

post #5 of 11

Back to the skiing---good job of keeping your feet together, pulling your feet back to bring your ski tips down to contact the snow, keeping your upper body facing downhill. 

 

A quicker release of the pole plant will help speed the prep for the next turn and help prevent having the shoulder that should be going forward getting pulled backward.  I trained with a former mogul competitor, and one of his tips was to be ready to make the next turn by the time your skis were heading down the fall line in this turn.  If you're ready, you can make a turn wherever it looks good to you.

 

Now, learn absorption/retraction turns.  https://vimeo.com/21849674

The advantages include quicker reactions and keeping the upper body more steady as well as not slamming into bumps you can't avoid.  You want to be able to extend your legs on the down-side of the bump, and in order to do that you need to contract your legs on the top of the bump.  Don't let yourself get into the back seat; pull both feet back as you absorb.  You can use retraction turns in all skiing except the few times you need to jump over an obstruction or it just feels good to fly.  When you get to Snowbird moguls hidden by a fresh snowfall, absorbing the bumps you can't see as you feel them is the only way to survive.

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

Alright good stuff. Absorption/retraction is definitely something I am constantly integrating in my mogul skiing. An eye opener moment was spending lots of time practicing dolphin turns, that really amped up the level of agility and nimbleness.

 

This thread has been silent so here is a partial thread hijack topic. I feel that at times I am a little more on my heels than I would like, I would like to be skiing over my arch the entire time. However, I have seen differing views particularly from that JF, Reilly, & Paul video. I personally try to stay over my arch, but JF makes a convincing argument:

 

Note: This video is fully available to buy here -> https://vimeo.com/ondemand/projectkitz

This is only a short clip from it, to get my point across. I don't own this and if the owner wants me to take it down, I will.

post #7 of 11

 

I suck in bumps so take this with a grain of salt.

The poles appears a bit long. That would inhibit a stance with softer legs.

The longer poles also don't release as quick, inducing a upward extension of the torso to clear them.

 

Bumps requires a shorter pole than cruising.    

post #8 of 11

 

 

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinceK View Post
 

Alright good stuff. Absorption/retraction is definitely something I am constantly integrating in my mogul skiing. An eye opener moment was spending lots of time practicing dolphin turns, that really amped up the level of agility and nimbleness.

 

This thread has been silent so here is a partial thread hijack topic. I feel that at times I am a little more on my heels than I would like, I would like to be skiing over my arch the entire time. However, I have seen differing views particularly from that JF, Reilly, & Paul video. I personally try to stay over my arch, but JF makes a convincing argument:

 

Note: This video is fully available to buy here -> https://vimeo.com/ondemand/projectkitz

This is only a short clip from it, to get my point across. I don't own this and if the owner wants me to take it down, I will.

I agree.  It has been quiet.  Maybe I can spice it up a bit.  What are your goals?  In your video you are skiing smoothly, in control.  What do you need to change?  I think it depends on what you want to accomplish.  Do you want to ski faster?  Who do you want to ski like?  Are there conditions that give you trouble?  My guess is that you would have to change some things to ski more challenging bump shapes as smoothly or to ski faster.  If there’s someone you wish to imitate, you could post their video, and I could attempt to say what’s similar and what’s different.  Or, if there are some conditions where you wish to do more, but are struggling, you could post that video, and it would be easy to point out what needs to change and why.  You are definitely in better control in your latest video.  The earlier video shows more struggle.  So, in this video where you are clearly well balanced, it becomes very subjective.  Some may want you to look a certain way; others may want to see you skiing in a way that will scale this smoothness to faster and harder terrain.  I’m in the latter camp, but to each his own.

post #10 of 11

Hey Vince,

 

Have fun out there at the bird and I hope/plan to ski with you and your dad at this year's Gathering in Aspen!

 

From a non instructor who has skied with you:  I agree with the Grumpy guy that it looks like your poles are a bit long and this may be a reason you appear to be standing a little too straight and tall. Someone mentioned softer legs... I think that means a little more absorption.

 

The other thing I noticed (probably because I had/have a habit of doing the same thing) is it looks like you are letting your left hnd drop back a bit and then rushing to get it back out front.  Especially apparent when the camera is behind you on the second video.

post #11 of 11

In your video talking about foot pressure location---note that both skiers are making retraction turns.  They keep their outside leg near-straight through the turn, increasing the angle to handle the increasing load, then flex the outside knee to release and end the turn.  3:04 to 3:20 shows this very well.  On a smooth slope, try this--keep your outside leg almost straight as the turn progresses, angulate more as the load increases, then to end the turn pull both knees up toward your chest.  It'll feel like you're pulling your knees way up, but as we know, what we feel is usually less that what we're actually doing.  Don't push your legs straight to start the next turn.  Allow them to extend as your skis travel away from your body.

 

Almost every activity has the athlete on the balls of their feet.  The only exceptions I've found are water skiing and clog dancing.  So...it is easier to get back in your ski boots than to get forward, right?  Try skiing on the balls of your feet.  Do it for several days.  After you can do this easily, if you want to move the pressure back a little, not too far, you can easily do that.  Locate the skis under your body's center of mass by how far you pull both feet back under you.

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