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Miller bindings

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

i came into some Miller bindings recently.  nice condition.  mounted on what looks like the original wooden display slab or salesman's aide (with logo).  and a pair of boots with the Miller plates on them.

 

any interest here for this kind of stuff?  i'll probably clean them up and fish on eBay but if anyone here had an interest/fair offer i'd be happier if they went to a Bear.

 

i'll try to post some pics tonight.

post #2 of 17
Worst binding ever made.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

really?  why?  from what i've read they were quite innovative at the time.  surely, relative to modern technology they are horrible.  but they're obviously a nostalgia piece at this point.  who cares how they performed at the time? 

 

as an aside, it's funny, on this site it seems like every binding sux except for anything Look has ever made.

post #4 of 17
The only binding I ever literally walked out of, in a lift line. They were immediately replaced by a Marker turntable and Nevada toe.

As for other bindings, I currently have a mix of Salomon, Atomic, Marker, Tyrolia and Look and have no complaints with any of them. I don't care for Marker heel on the Griffon/Jester/Baron bindings because they're so hard to back into in soft snow.
post #5 of 17

That's like the second one that's surfaced here this year.    

From the RM thread:

http://www.epicski.com/t/69076/more-retro-memories/6660#post_1819266

 

^if that is the type of binding you have be sure to read the Gordon Lipe article

 

If it's from the 70s like the M500 shown here:

http://www.epicski.com/t/69076/more-retro-memories/6480#post_1790509


then I wonder at mtcyclists' experience. 


Either way, post up!

post #6 of 17

those are both my posts.  I would guess it is the identical toe/heel version.  I have not skied that style.  doubt I ever will. they are a dime a dozen in my area(Utah)   I wasn't going to ski the miller toe/ cable/heel  until I saw Alf Engen's skis with that set up. I figured if it was good enough for Alf I could at least give them a run or two.  

 

As for all the LOOK love,  time is the proof there. the turn table heel is a proven design. Marker no longer makes one. Marker m4 toes (and many of the newer toes too) were very sensitive to forward pressure and when incorrectly set they were not reliable,  that and the glut of low end crappy marker bindings in the 80's and 90's turned a lot of skiers off to that brand.  

 

cheers

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by royal View Post

I would guess it is the identical toe/heel version.
Yup, that's what they were and it was in 1964. I couldn't get them to say on. I had one release one day when I got some air going off a lip. Coming off in the lift line was the last straw.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Worst binding ever made.


Wow, that's a strong opinion, and pretty much not an opinion of Miller Bindings that I've heard before.  I worked iin a ski shop in the 60's and the Miller binding was one of the best, if not the best,  release bindings available at the time.  They were very hard to mount though, and if the tech didn't know her his business the improper mounting could negate the bindings operation.  In our shop the owner was the guy who mounted the Millers we sold.  Well, maybe one other guy too after some practice.  Compared to the competition, mostly cable bindings, Millers were way ahead of everything else.  Cubcos were another sorta similar binding at that time (boot plates fore and aft and more release angles than cables), but were cruder looking  -- and easier to mount.

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Worst binding ever made.

How can you say such a thing when Cubco was there to compete with it?  

 

Both of them gave you metal plates that should have been sponsored by emergency rooms. Walking on ice or lino was an extreme sport. Both had lots of open springs that could pack up with slush and freeze. You saw pretty much NO good skiers using these things unless they were paid to

 

Using Miller bindings sucked at a high level.

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

interesting discussion.  thanks for the info.  here are the pics of what i have.  you can see they are mounted to what looks like an salesman's aide or advertising plate.  two of the bindings have a double spring, the other is single spring.  (also have a LOOK salesman's aide for the LOOK lovers.  btw, trying to remove a Look 99 right now -- my gosh, the most well built and difficult thing to remove i've ever seen!  though the spring blew out of the plastic - i'll post a pic elsewhere.)

 

 

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post
 

How can you say such a thing when Cubco was there to compete with it?  

 

Both of them gave you metal plates that should have been sponsored by emergency rooms. Walking on ice or lino was an extreme sport. Both had lots of open springs that could pack up with slush and freeze. You saw pretty much NO good skiers using these things unless they were paid to

 

Using Miller bindings sucked at a high level.

My first bindings in 1966 were Millers, my brother's first bindings at the same time were Cubcos. My Dad bought them at Joe's Ski Shop in St. Paul: the salesman sold him on the safety factor: specifically, the upward release in the toe piece. About the only alternatives were Rotomats with longthongs, Look Nevada heel and toe, or basic cable bindings. But those boot plates were treacherous!

post #12 of 17

the single spring was the Jr. model.  what is the difficulty with removal of the LOOK 99's?

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

screws would not some loose.  at all.  (actually 2 of the 14 did).  stripped them pretty good.  i'm pretty handy so know what i'm doing but they just would't budge.  in the process of drilling them out with black oxide bits but they dull almost instantly.  the screws are made from some tough steel.  going to get a cobalt bit today.  wrestled with some other methods but no avail.  SOLIDLY built, my goodness...

post #14 of 17

Don't forget to try the heat method.   

post #15 of 17
Had these on a pair of Yamaha hi flex back around 1969 or 70. Never any problems. Long thongs with them. They had some kind of broken bone guarantee if I remember
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonD999 View Post
 

screws would not some loose.  at all.  (actually 2 of the 14 did).  stripped them pretty good.  i'm pretty handy so know what i'm doing but they just would't budge.  in the process of drilling them out with black oxide bits but they dull almost instantly.  the screws are made from some tough steel.  going to get a cobalt bit today.  wrestled with some other methods but no avail.  SOLIDLY built, my goodness...

I'm sure you know but just make sure you are using the correct size  POZI-DRIVE bit.  Also they may be epoxied or loc-tited in.  if you really run into a bind I can send you a carbide bit.  we make diamond bits on carbide shafts and I have a lot of scrap bits laying around.

 

good luck

post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 

actually, had no idea it was POSI-DRIVE.   didn't even know what PD was.  thanks for the info.  hopefully, next time i'll be prepared with a PD screwdriver and not strip them out.  

 

for now, think i'll get a cobalt bit and see what i can do.  appreciate the offer.  thanks - might still take you up on it!

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