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Ski Shop adjusted a non-indemnified binding

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I took some old skis to my local ski shop to see if the bindings were still indemnified, and to get them adjusted if they were (Marker 3.1M, Logic bindings).  The people at the local ski shop said that they were still indemnified, so they adjusted them.

 

I also emailed Marker to see if those bindings were on the indemnification list.  I got an email back after the bindings had been adjusted saying that those bindings were no longer indemnified.

 

What does this mean for the skier?  What does this mean for the ski shop that adjusted the non-indemnified binding?

post #2 of 13

Sounds like the shop either made a mistake or read the Indemnification list wrong. It also sounds like the binding passed the release test and functions properly. As for what it means for the skier, it sounds like you have more information now than before you had it tested and you can decide if you feel comfortable skiing the binding. As for what it means for the shop? They made an error. An option would be to go back there and ask for a refund/credit of the amount that you paid for the adjust and calibrate or the another option would be to ski it. The latter would be at your risk, not the shops because now you are knowing skiing a non indemnified binding.

 

There are shops that will regularly test non indemnified bindings for numerous reasons such as they know the person will ski them whether they test them or not. So, by testing them, they will just make sure they are at least functioning within range. BUT, they will fail the binding because they do not pass the visual inspection. 


Edited by Philpug - 10/23/15 at 6:35am
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Sounds like the shop either made a mistake or read the Indemnification list wrong. It also sounds like the binding passed the release test and functions properly. As for what it means for the skier, it sounds like you have more information now than before you had it tested and you can decide if you feel comfortable skiing the binding. As for what it means for the shop? They made an error. An option would be to go back there and ask for a refund/credit of the amount that you paid for the adjust and calibrate or the another option would be to ski it. The latter would be at your risk, not the shops because now you are knowing skiing a non indemnified binding.

 

There are shops that will regularly test non indemnified bindings for numerous reasons such as they know the person will ski them whether they test them or not. So, by testing them, they will just make sure they are at least functioning within range. BUT, they will fail the binding because they do not pass the visual inspection. 

Okay, thanks for the info.

post #4 of 13

When do bindings drop of the list?  Is there a fixed date for producing a new list for 2015-2016 season? 

It's possible to adjust indemnified bindings, then have them drop off the list the next day.

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

When do bindings drop of the list?  Is there a fixed date for producing a new list for 2015-2016 season? 

It's possible to adjust indemnified bindings, then have them drop off the list the next day.

Rule of thumb is about 10 years. Some manufacturers take of binding by binding, some will take off a whole series. The list tends to get released Octoberish and really should be gone over at the shop especially with anyone who works at a service desk and interacting with consumers. 

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisch2332 View Post
 

I took some old skis to my local ski shop to see if the bindings were still indemnified, and to get them adjusted if they were (Marker 3.1M, Logic bindings).  The people at the local ski shop said that they were still indemnified, so they adjusted them.

 

I also emailed Marker to see if those bindings were on the indemnification list.  I got an email back after the bindings had been adjusted saying that those bindings were no longer indemnified.

 

What does this mean for the skier?  What does this mean for the ski shop that adjusted the non-indemnified binding?


I would look-up the list myself, if the indemnified list that the shop used was old and your binding was added this season find out for yourself.  If this seasons list is published maybe Epic could make it available for it's members.   The 2015 - 2016 season is here and it would be good if we had the latest information.  We also can decide for our self if the list is any or all of the following:

 

1. A safety list for the consumer.

2. A marketing tool to sell more bindings.

3. A legal tool to protect the manufacture.

4. A guideline so people will at least test their equipment.

5. A recall list for defective product.

 

What testing devise was used by the shop if any after they adjusted your bindings?  Are binding spec's available for your bindings and what are the tolerances for safety?  See if you could get that for your bindings and if it passed a release check you can make an informed decision.

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

When do bindings drop of the list?  Is there a fixed date for producing a new list for 2015-2016 season? 

It's possible to adjust indemnified bindings, then have them drop off the list the next day.

Rule of thumb is about 10 years. Some manufacturers take of binding by binding, some will take off a whole series. The list tends to get released Octoberish and really should be gone over at the shop especially with anyone who works at a service desk and interacting with consumers. 

Thanks.  So quite possible to have a binding on the (old) list and adjusted in October, and then a bit later e-mail Marker and find it is no longer on the (new) list.

post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisch2332 View Post
 

I took some old skis to my local ski shop to see if the bindings were still indemnified, and to get them adjusted if they were (Marker 3.1M, Logic bindings).  The people at the local ski shop said that they were still indemnified, so they adjusted them.

 

I also emailed Marker to see if those bindings were on the indemnification list.  I got an email back after the bindings had been adjusted saying that those bindings were no longer indemnified.

 

What does this mean for the skier?  What does this mean for the ski shop that adjusted the non-indemnified binding?

For the Skier, not much.  You probably signed a waver holding shop harmless.

 

For the Shop, not much.  You probably signed a waver.......

 

And if you didn't save the paperwork from the shop, they probably never saw you.

 

Then there is the 'you changed the setting' after you left the shop clause.

post #9 of 13

What indemnification means in practice is that if a shop services a binding and the customer gets injured and files suit, the binding manufacturer will cover the legal expenses in defending the lawsuit.  If the binding is no longer on the indemnification list, the shop is on its own.  This is why most shops won't touch non-indemnified bindings.

 

In your case, the binding passed the release test, so my take is that they are fine.  I'd go skiing and not worry, but I'd also think about replacing the skis and bindings next season.  Skis only last a few seasons before material fatigue sets in, so if the skis are as old as the bindings you're due for a new pair.

post #10 of 13

Another concern about older bindings, even if they pass the release check, is material fatigue, particularly in plastic heel and toe cups.   If one of these breaks you could be in for a nasty injury.

post #11 of 13

These are Marker bindings.  No plastic for the important bits.

post #12 of 13

Solution: consider yourself lucky and move on with your life.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
 

What indemnification means in practice is that if a shop services a binding and the customer gets injured and files suit, the binding manufacturer will cover the legal expenses in defending the lawsuit.  If the binding is no longer on the indemnification list, the shop is on its own.  This is why most shops won't touch non-indemnified bindings.

 

In your case, the binding passed the release test, so my take is that they are fine.  I'd go skiing and not worry, but I'd also think about replacing the skis and bindings next season.  Skis only last a few seasons before material fatigue sets in, so if the skis are as old as the bindings you're due for a new pair.

 

I'd like to thank Walt for explaining this in laymens terms. It makes much more sense now.

 

Karl

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