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Tricks for getting your foot into an Intuition Liner - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer View Post

Leave the liner in the shell...cut a shoe horn from a 1 gal. water bottle...spray with teflon...slip foot in.
However, I can't get my boots off after a cold day until they warm up...

Basically the poor man's skiboot horn, retail price $9.95, right?

:worthless  Got Pics?  I want to make one and was wondering where to cut it for a first cut (Maybe a final cut if you help me get it right).

post #32 of 41
post #33 of 41

Try making one from the 1 gal water jugs you get from the the grocery store...just start a cut near the bottom of the bottle, the curved spot, up the side... similar in shape as this...

post #34 of 41
Thread Starter 

I bought the "shoe horn" that Racer shows above and it works well (at least with my warm boots in my basement) putting my foot into the liner that is already in the shell.  Good find, thanks.

post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Uh, race liners are lace-ups. Doesn't anyone here put on their liners first, then slip into the shell? Easy peasy, compared to working your foot in. Fairly common among racers of all ilk, FWIW. 

 

 

This.  There is a lot less friction between the outside of the liner and the inside of the boot  than between the inside of the liner and the outside of your sock.  That means the liner will slide into the boot with much less effort than it takes to jam your foot into the liner once it's already in the boot.  I switched a couple of years ago and I'll never go back

 

It's very simple: with the liners out of the boots, put your foot in the liner, lace it up, and then put your foot into the shell with the liner already on.  It helps a lot to have the boots warm so that they are pliable.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by robbo mcs View Post

the laces on intuitions are really optional, they do not really add anything to the stiffnes or bracing of the liner. The laces are small and flimsy, and don't really overlap much. Intuition say themselves that they are optional. The laces are useful if you want to wear the liner alone without the shell, eg if you are camping, or in a lodge and want to keep your feet warm.

 

Yep.  The main idea of the laces is so that when you go back country skiing and spent the night in a yurt you can pad about in your liners without them falling off.  Otherwise, they don't do much for you. 

 

At first Intuition only had laces on their AT liners but they found that a lot of customers were buying the wrong liner for their boots/feet because they wanted laces.  So Intuition started putting laces on all their liners - they want their customers to have the right fit and not choose because of some fairly unimportant feature.  Or at least this is what Crystal (their main fitter at the warehouse in Vancouver) told me.

post #36 of 41

It must be boot/liner specific.  I don't own intuitions, so my experience is not germain to the current discussion.  Nevertheless, for what it's worth to others reading and to avoid carrying over specific results to the general case, my Koflachs and my Solomon's are easier to put on with the liner in the boot first.  Stretching them wide open a few times and pulling the tongue out before putting the boots on helps. 

post #37 of 41

I have never had laces on any of my many Intuition Powerwraps including the ones I bought a few weeks ago.

post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

I have never had laces on any of my many Intuition Powerwraps including the ones I bought a few weeks ago.

 

They're really a tongue liner thing.

post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

They're really a tongue liner thing.

 

I never have owned straight Intuitions, either; I've had DFP liners, and Daleboot? I think branded Intuitions, but both with little modifications (as in, the Daleboot liner was slicker on the inside and easier to get into, that's why the bootfitter preferred it to regular Intuitions).

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

They're really a tongue liner thing.

 

I never have owned straight Intuitions, either; I've had DFP liners, and Daleboot? I think branded Intuitions, but both with little modifications (as in, the Daleboot liner was slicker on the inside and easier to get into, that's why the bootfitter preferred it to regular Intuitions).

 

Wait, what?   You DELIBERATELY COMPROMISED the sock/liner interface layer?  :eek:nono:    ;):D

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

Wait, what?   You DELIBERATELY COMPROMISED the sock/liner interface layer?  :eek:nono:    ;):D

Don't shoot me!

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