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Gus Kenworthy Comes out.

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

From ESPN...

 

 

Almost immediately, Kenworthy says, he felt pressure to fit in. Friends weren't an issue; he was good-looking and likable, the kind of guy who gets along with everyone. But girls were an inescapable part of the role. "In skiing, there's such an alpha male thing about pulling the hottest chicks," Kenworthy says. "I know hooking up with hot girls doesn't sound like the worst thing in the world. But I literally would sleep with a girl and then cry about it afterward. I'm like, 'What am I doing? 
I don't know what I'm doing.'"

On the mountain, Kenworthy was unstoppable. At 15, he competed in the USASA Nationals and took first place in superpipe and third in slopestyle. But 2010 was his breakout year -- he won both slopestyle and superpipe at the Aspen/Snowmass Open. Still, there was one competition that was in his head, one 
that loomed larger to him than the rest -- the X Games. "More than I've wanted anything," Kenworthy says, "I've wanted to do well at the X Games."

Kenworthy grew up watching the X Games, always noticing how the announcers riffed about his favorite skiers as the camera focused on their families and girlfriends. "It was such a window into who they were," he says. So when he competed there for the first time, at 
19, the year after that breakout event, it probably shouldn't have come as a surprise when an ESPN TV producer asked if his girlfriend would be in attendance. And yet, it caught him completely off guard. "No, no girlfriend," Kenworthy replied, his stomach twisting into knots. The question left him nervous, feeling guilty, his focus completely shot. 
It was no way to drop into a slopestyle course or an icy, 22-foot-tall halfpipe. 
"X Games has been the death of me," Kenworthy says. "I've won every contest on tour and medaled at the Olympics, and I've never won a medal in Aspen."

That refrain -- "No, no girlfriend" -- is something Kenworthy wound up repeating year after year, even when he had a boyfriend standing in the crowd, cheering him on. The X Games are a testosterone-fueled, obligation-filled weekend, which can make it difficult to focus, but it's that one question that Kenworthy believes affects him most deeply and throws him off his game. "Part of [the stress] is the fact that I've never had a TV boyfriend," he says. "That's actually something I want so bad -- a TV boyfriend."

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE.
 
Kudos to Gus and I am sure he feels like the weight of the world is off his shoulders. I think I found my new favorite skier. 
post #2 of 14

Thumbs Up

post #3 of 14

Good for him, but... didn't everyone already know he was gay?  I didn't know it was a secret.

post #4 of 14

Thumbs UpThumbs UpThumbs Up

post #5 of 14

Our society has come a long way, and I'm so glad. That most definitely does have to be a huge weight lifted off his shoulders.

 

Repealing don't ask-don't tell was such a huge step in the right direction, too. I can speak from experience just based on how things changed with my husband in the Air Force. Shortly after, there were a few surprises (pictures started showing up on desks, etc.) and a few that were not a surprise at all. Finally, those people could be who they were. They could bring their significant others to events. And guess what? They were accepted and treated just as they always had been. As it should be.

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by contesstant View Post
 

Our society has come a long way, and I'm so glad. That most definitely does have to be a huge weight lifted off his shoulders.

 

Repealing don't ask-don't tell was such a huge step in the right direction, too. I can speak from experience just based on how things changed with my husband in the Air Force. Shortly after, there were a few surprises (pictures started showing up on desks, etc.) and a few that were not a surprise at all. Finally, those people could be who they were. They could bring their significant others to events. And guess what? They were accepted and treated just as they always had been. As it should be.


Yeah, in this day and age, I don't know why this is even a story anymore.

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by contesstant View Post
 

Our society has come a long way, and I'm so glad. That most definitely does have to be a huge weight lifted off his shoulders.

 

Repealing don't ask-don't tell was such a huge step in the right direction, too. I can speak from experience just based on how things changed with my husband in the Air Force. Shortly after, there were a few surprises (pictures started showing up on desks, etc.) and a few that were not a surprise at all. Finally, those people could be who they were. They could bring their significant others to events. And guess what? They were accepted and treated just as they always had been. As it should be.


Yeah, in this day and age, I don't know why this is even a story anymore.

It is a story because Gus is a role model, young skiers idolize him and if it can give one kid hope that he CAN come out and it will be OK and he won't be ostracized...it is a good story. 

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

It is a story because Gus is a role model, young skiers idolize him and if it can give one kid hope that he CAN come out and it will be OK and he won't be ostracized...it is a good story. 


Sorry Phil..not disagreeing..just saying, I didn't think it was a big deal anymore to be gay.  I thought society was beyond that?  Maybe different south of the border?  It's a great story for sure.

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 


Yeah, in this day and age, I don't know why this is even a story anymore.

 

Well, in the sports arena it still is for sure.  Not many high level athletes (especially male) have come out formally.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by contesstant View Post
 

Our society has come a long way, and I'm so glad. That most definitely does have to be a huge weight lifted off his shoulders.

 

Repealing don't ask-don't tell was such a huge step in the right direction, too. I can speak from experience just based on how things changed with my husband in the Air Force. Shortly after, there were a few surprises (pictures started showing up on desks, etc.) and a few that were not a surprise at all. Finally, those people could be who they were. They could bring their significant others to events. And guess what? They were accepted and treated just as they always had been. As it should be.


Yeah, in this day and age, I don't know why this is even a story anymore.

It is a story because Gus is a role model, young skiers idolize him and if it can give one kid hope that he CAN come out and it will be OK and he won't be ostracized...it is a good story. 

 

 

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

It is a story because Gus is a role model, young skiers idolize him and if it can give one kid hope that he CAN come out and it will be OK and he won't be ostracized...it is a good story. 


Sorry Phil..not disagreeing..just saying, I didn't think it was a big deal anymore to be gay.  I thought society was beyond that?  Maybe different south of the border?  It's a great story for sure.

I agree it should be a non story, but a good non story. Better story than Llamar Odom and the Kardashians thats for sure. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool47 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by contesstant View Post
 

Our society has come a long way, and I'm so glad. That most definitely does have to be a huge weight lifted off his shoulders.

 

Repealing don't ask-don't tell was such a huge step in the right direction, too. I can speak from experience just based on how things changed with my husband in the Air Force. Shortly after, there were a few surprises (pictures started showing up on desks, etc.) and a few that were not a surprise at all. Finally, those people could be who they were. They could bring their significant others to events. And guess what? They were accepted and treated just as they always had been. As it should be.


Yeah, in this day and age, I don't know why this is even a story anymore.

It is a story because Gus is a role model, young skiers idolize him and if it can give one kid hope that he CAN come out and it will be OK and he won't be ostracized...it is a good story. 

 

 

You lost me on that. :confused

post #12 of 14

Yeah, I'm not sure either.  Maybe the double next guitar somehow represents two males living in perfect harmony, in juxtaposition with a song about a woman waiting for him?   Brilliant performance art and social commentary if so. 

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post
 

Yeah, I'm not sure either.  Maybe the double next guitar somehow represents two males living in perfect harmony, in juxtaposition with a song about a woman waiting for him?   Brilliant performance art and social commentary if so. 

 

A friend told me that The Stampeders and Burton played together at Banff in the 1980s.

 

 

 

 

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

Well, in the sports arena it still is for sure.  Not many high level athletes (especially male) have come out formally.

 

Yeah, this.

 

Plus, the whole Sochi puppies story.

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