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Website with ski lift vertical drop stats?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Does such a site exist?

Thanks,
Brett
************************** (snow)
post #2 of 21

Maybe you can find what you're looking for here:

 

http://www.skilifts.org/old/install_na.htm

post #3 of 21

skilifts.org is the closest thing out there. However, they are out of date and their information is limited. Some resorts and lifts they have data for, others they do not.

 

mountain vertical.com can be helpful if the lift you are looking at is a top to bottom lift at a resort.

 

The generally available info online is the length of the lift, rather than the vertical drop.

 

Using a tool like hillmap or finding the info on individual resort websites is about as good as it gets. I have done a pretty exhaustive review of the lifts in New England scrounging a lot of that data into one place. I can PM you the data if you want.

post #4 of 21
Are you looking for all hills or one place in particular? Is this for development of a database or a fight with a friend? Maybe someone here has data to help if it's just one particular lift. Sometimes a resort has the info, maybe on an older map that can be dug up, or on some database that they keep. There's a ski map site that has old maps on it. Sometimes they've replaced chairs but the new chair is in the same spot, etc. That's useful if this is just a one resort thing. But an all over database? There been attempts on and off, but I haven't found one I've bookmarked. Market opportunity for someone looking to create an app.
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks all. Mainly I just enjoy planning on where to ski on each mountain during my ski vacation. Not that we usually stick to that plan. I guess it's entertainment smile.gif
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpskier View Post

Thanks all. Mainly I just enjoy planning on where to ski on each mountain during my ski vacation. Not that we usually stick to that plan. I guess it's entertainment smile.gif


I trust you know how to find the EpicSki Unofficial Guides.  Some of the best info around if you are going to a place that has been written up by an EpicSki Ambassador.

 

OnTheSnow has collected decent info for a lot of places.  Some of the data may be from marketing sources, but at least it's all in a consistent format.  Sometimes I like to compare places from different regions and it's a lot easier than looking for stats on individual websites.

 

One of the features I liked about the Aspen trail maps was that it included stats for each of the lifts.  Wish more of the bigger ski resorts would do the same.

post #7 of 21
http://mountainvertical.com/

Try that for figuring out what every ski area vertical is.
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post

http://mountainvertical.com/

Try that for figuring out what every ski area vertical is.


Yes, but that's the max for the whole ski area.  Doesn't help to figure out what each lift does for a particular place.

post #9 of 21

I found this website a while back, has what you are looking for, but I'm not sure how accurate it is:

 

https://jollyturns.com/resorts/

post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ionlylooklazy View Post

I found this website a while back, has what you are looking for, but I'm not sure how accurate it is:

https://jollyturns.com/resorts/

Well, there's not a single lift listed for us that matches the published vertical rise for the lifts here. Some are only a couple feet off, some much more, like 35 feet. I'm thinking they maybe used a GPS or altimeter to get the data on their own? They could have just grabbed a trail mail here, so it's odd to go to that trouble, but I also know some of the published numbers here are wrong, because they've lengthened lifts without changing the map. So maybe those numbers are better than no information. Most of my versions I cross referenced to the Doppelmayer database and older maps to make sure I was comfortable with the numbers.

Anyway, for the OP's purposes, these are probably good enough.

Some of their "trail lines" are subject to interpretation....

Fascinating link, thanks.
Edited by sibhusky - 10/22/15 at 10:51pm
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ionlylooklazy View Post

I found this website a while back, has what you are looking for, but I'm not sure how accurate it is:

https://jollyturns.com/resorts/

Well, there's not a single lift listed for us that matches the published vertical rise for the lifts here. Some are only a couple feet off, some much more, like 35 feet. I'm thinking they maybe used a GPS or altimeter to get the data on their own? They could have just grabbed a trail mail here, so it's odd to go to that trouble, but I also know some of the published numbers here are wrong, because they've lengthened lifts without changing the map. So maybe those numbers are better than no information. Most of my versions I cross referenced to the Doppelmayer database and older maps to make sure I was comfortable with the numbers.

Anyway, for the OP's purposes, these are probably good enough.

Some of their "trail lines" are subject to interpretation....

Fascinating link, thanks.


From reading the website info, they created the trail and lift data without using published sources within the last couple years.  For ski areas with trails on Google Maps, I wonder if they used that info in some way?

 

I looked at the info for Massanutten (tiny hill, 75 acres).  I think it's off a little for Lift 6 (used my GPS on that one time) but it's pretty neat to have any elevation data for every lift.  They've mapped over 550 ski areas in North America.  The interface for zooming in on a region is nice.  I think the idea behind having resort data is that if you have the actual app then you can download the data for a resort, which means being able to access that info on the slopes even if there is no coverage for online access.

 

https://jollyturns.com/blog/all-resorts-in-north-america

 

"We generate this data ourselves for each ski resort, using custom built tools. As such there might be errors in the mapping. If you do see one at your favorite resort, please do not hesitate to contact us."

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post



Fascinating link, thanks.

 

I agree.  Overall, lots of great info on the jollyturns website.  MountainVertical has always been my "go to" site for getting the nitty-gritty, but jollyturns actually provides more info with vertical for each and every run.  That is outstanding.  I just wish the resorts hadn't gone to breaking up all the runs into pieces to market a higher number of trails.  For example, Bassackwards at Snowbird is shown to have a vertical of 397 feet.  But wait, Lower Bassackwards is 676 and Lowest Bassackwards is 331.

 

Clicking on the individual runs shows the path on the trail map which was used to obtain the data.  That is incredible!


Edited by Lofcaudio - 10/23/15 at 7:32am
post #13 of 21
No Android, though. :-(
post #14 of 21

Interesting and fairly accurate. I noted that. even on runs which are not broken up into different named runs, there is some room for interpretation on where a run begins and ends.

post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ionlylooklazy View Post

I found this website a while back, has what you are looking for, but I'm not sure how accurate it is:

https://jollyturns.com/resorts/


Nice find there. Seems very accurate for the ski areas I ski at.
post #16 of 21

I'm in the process of building a new, updated lift database (as mentioned above, the one on Skilifts.org hasn't been updated since 2010.)  You can find it at http://liftblog.com/united-states/

 

I have stats for every resort in the US and Canada on my computer so if you have a specific area you need info on just ask.

Peter

post #17 of 21
The numbers for the lifts at Whitefish are here:
http://skiwhitefish.com/mountain-stats/

There's a lift I think is wrong. My version:
Chair vert
1 2088
2 1316
3 434
4 1360
5 840
6 281
7 1216
8 1272
9 269
10 461
flower point 11 970
big Foot 400

Chair two never changed on their maps when they extended it further down the hill. I think I got that other number from Doppelmayer but wouldn't swear to it. Jolly Turns has it a third number.
post #18 of 21

The maker of Jollyturns here.

 

We've generated the data starting from the ski resorts' published maps. Our mapping process then uses Google Earth to place lifts and ski runs, and a custom-built web tool to map the lifts and ski runs on the resort's map(s). The latter lets you see the location of lifts and ski runs on a resort's map(s), as opposed to the potentially unfamiliar top-down view shown by Google Maps or Apple Maps. This works surprisingly well at the resorts in California, Utah, Colorado and British Columbia I've tested the app at.

 

We obtain elevation information from Google's Elevation service, so that should be fairly accurate. Note however that the elevation varies due to several factors: where the top and bottom points of a lift are placed in Google Earth, and the resolution of the DEMs used by Google (3 meters or worse).

 

We currently cover all the alpine ski resorts in the world. We're still working on showing more information both in the mobile app, as well as on the web site. Currently I'm working on more detailed user statistics: lifts and ski runs you've taken, in addition to what's currently computed. These will be visible within the app, and on the web site.

 

I'd appreciate any feedback you might have.

post #19 of 21

I just updated the web site to include a lot more information and statistics on the ski resorts we have mapped.

 

https://jollyturns.com/resorts/

 

For each resort you can now see the length of the ski runs, in addition to vertical drops for lifts and ski runs. The site ranks the various resorts based on quite a few characteristics: number of lifts and ski, length of ski runs etc. Drill down at the level of a country or state/region to see more focused statistics.

 

Also download the Jollyturns mobile app to see where you and your friends are on the mountain, and keep track of your statistics.

 

Enjoy your turns!

post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Coolio!
post #21 of 21
Quote CentralVT08:
skilifts.org is the closest thing out there. However, they are out of date and their information is limited. Some resorts and lifts they have data for, others they do not.

This was my starting point for vertical transport feet calculations last fall.  But I needed to compare to trail maps to delete removed lifts and add new ones.  For lifts in new locations I had to use Google Earth for estimates sometimes.

 

https://jollyturns.com/resorts/  looks like an impressive amount of work and this is the first time I've seen it.  I scanned Mammoth, the resort I know best.  The level of detail, marking individual trails on the map (several of which I've skied but may not have known names) is what most impressed me. 

 

This level of detail, if done for ~2,600 ski resorts, must have been a ton of work.  As some of you know, I have created a Google Earth kml file for ~1,900 resorts in the world, downloadable here:  http://www.firsttracksonline.com/ski-snowboard-downloads/  This process took quite awhile, even with 2 other people occasionally assisting me.

 

The individual lift stats for Mammoth look slightly understated in many cases.  Old Mammoth trail maps had lift stats but they were in some cases rounded. Some newer Mammoth lifts have elevation stated to the nearest foot at both base and unloading stations.  I been counting lift vertical at Mammoth since I started skiing there in 1978, also using a Vertech watch since 1995.  The current marking on the lifts is likely accurate, unfortunately no longer on the trail map. 

 

At any rate, I've used Google Earth a lot to estimate vertical drops, and while it's good, I view it as the tool of last resort for that purpose. 25 years ago most resorts showed chair verticals on trail maps.  Fewer are doing it now, as I suppose the resorts think the people who care are using altimeter watches or apps. But I think that ill serves the skiing public.  If trail maps have both length and vertical of lifts, it's easier to figure out how steep the mountain is, even if you haven't been there.  Google Earth is the useful backup for that exercise too.

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