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How are your ski decisions influenced? - Page 2

Poll Results: What influences your ski buying decision?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 58% of voters (58)
    Personal Demoing- "I have to make my own choices based on my own experience"
  • 20% of voters (20)
    Magazine Reviews- "This was the number 1 ski in..."
  • 53% of voters (53)
    On-line reviews- "Magazine reviews were fine 10 years ago"
  • 6% of voters (6)
    Traditional Advertising- 'This ski was won all these awards"
  • 5% of voters (5)
    Viral Advertising- "All the buzz has been about the new____"
  • 31% of voters (31)
    Friends suggestions- "We call them "Influencers""
  • 1% of voters (1)
    Pro Skier Endorsements- "Bob Broski skis only the ____ when straight lining AK"
  • 5% of voters (5)
    Graphics- "The graphics are so dope/clean/timeless/retro"
  • 16% of voters (16)
    Brand Loyalty-"I only ski _____"
  • 46% of voters (46)
    Clearance Price- "If the ski was good last year, it will be good this year, besides its just a graphic change"
  • 16% of voters (16)
    Other- "If it's important to you, it's important"
99 Total Votes  
post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Of course it's a flawed poll, and we all know that, but not because you couldn't vote for multiple choices.

It's flawed because, "I buy the ski that performs the best at what I want it to do." is missing.

Thats why "other" is there. Also, how do you determine how the ski performs at the best you want it to do? What lead up to that point? 


Exactly!  Not only was the obvious answer lumped in with "other", the question lacked adequate precision.  ;)

 

How do I determine how the ski will perform?

If possible demo that exact ski and extrapolate/interpolate performance to other conditions.

Hand flex and twist the ski in the shop.

Read all the reviews and technical specs I can find on the ski then extrapolate/interpolate demo experience from other skis knowing the differences in specs of all skis I have demoed.

Ask questions on ski forums.

post #32 of 50
Country of origin
post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MerlinTi View Post

Country of origin

I think locally that issue led to a huge reduction in the numbers of skiers on K2.
post #34 of 50

I had to vote "Brand Loyalty" -- because I have never skied on anything but Kastle.   I have no problem with that for two reasons:

1)  Kastle's just 'work' -- and its hard to go wrong with one.

2)  It's a lot easier to compare different models of skis of a single brand rather than broadening out to compare (and understand) between brands

3)  I like the brand.  It just feels right to me.

 

I would love to buy based on personal experience from a demo.  But, in my region, as far as I can tell, there are no demos.   At least none that I have seen or heard of...

 

Unfortunately, I am hesitant to take shop advice for several reasons:

1)  Most shop personnel around me may be good skiers -- but they are not trained technicians.  Essentially, when they sell they selling what is on their shelves rather than what is best for me.  In fact, when I take my Kastle's in for work, most do not seem to have ever even heard of the brand,

2)  There is just too much personal opinion involved in recommending a particular ski.  This became especially apparent when I asked my local shop about tuning my skis and what would be best.  The answer I got was:  "Here is how we tune skis.  If you don't want that tune (including detuned fore & aft), then go elsewhere.  They seem to think we are to just do what the doctor tells us without question. 

3)  Until somebody has seen me ski I have trouble believing that they understand my needs.   A 60 second description of my skiing style and abilities just doesn't cut it -- especially since I am 65 and the clerk has already made up his mind how I ski before I even open my mouth...

 

So, I stick to my own advice -- and when buying Kastles, I figure I can't go too far wrong.

post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeBMac View Post
 

I had to vote "Brand Loyalty" -- because I have never skied on anything but Kastle.   I have no problem with that for two reasons:

1)  Kastle's just 'work' -- and its hard to go wrong with one.

2)  It's a lot easier to compare different models of skis of a single brand rather than broadening out to compare (and understand) between brands

3)  I like the brand.  It just feels right to me.

 

I would love to buy based on personal experience from a demo.  But, in my region, as far as I can tell, there are no demos.   At least none that I have seen or heard of...

 

Unfortunately, I am hesitant to take shop advice for several reasons:

1)  Most shop personnel around me may be good skiers -- but they are not trained technicians.  Essentially, when they sell they selling what is on their shelves rather than what is best for me.  In fact, when I take my Kastle's in for work, most do not seem to have ever even heard of the brand,

2)  There is just too much personal opinion involved in recommending a particular ski.  This became especially apparent when I asked my local shop about tuning my skis and what would be best.  The answer I got was:  "Here is how we tune skis.  If you don't want that tune (including detuned fore & aft), then go elsewhere.  They seem to think we are to just do what the doctor tells us without question. 

3)  Until somebody has seen me ski I have trouble believing that they understand my needs.   A 60 second description of my skiing style and abilities just doesn't cut it -- especially since I am 65 and the clerk has already made up his mind how I ski before I even open my mouth...

 

So, I stick to my own advice -- and when buying Kastles, I figure I can't go too far wrong.

Given that you like Kastles, it probably doesn't make any difference but pretty sure that Seven Springs has an annual demo day sponsored by a local ski shop in early January.  You're in Pittsburgh, right?

 

Really depends on the shop.  I've found that the shop that does an annual demo weekend at Massanutten (northern VA) has someone who knows the skis they sell pretty well.  Of course, not all the staff are that knowledgeable.  The selection is geared towards people who ski the Mid-Atlantic but also take a trip or two out west so they have more all-mountain skis than you might expect.

post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeBMac View Post
Essentially, when they sell they selling what is on their shelves rather than what is best for me.

I have seen some, nay too much, of that too.

Yeah, you can't go too far wrong with the current Kastle skis.  Whomever bought the name this time around and started producing skis with the Kastle name did it right (not like before).  Just have to choose the right one for you conditions, and then for maximum enjoyment (if you haven't already done so) learn to ski it the best way.  :)

post #37 of 50

Step 1) Buy a ski from some indie make that's completely new to me, without any possibility to demo, because there's a 20+ page thread about the ski on TGR and it sounds awesome.

Step 2) Get the tour layup because I tour all the time (not really).

Step 3) Wait until conditions are perfect and get about 2 days on the ski.

Step 4) Decide that I don't like the ski as much as I thought, because it's not damp or stiff enough, and throw it up on gear swap for $200.

Step 5) Go back to skiing my OG LPRs circa 2006.

Step 6) Repeat.

post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post


I think locally that issue led to a huge reduction in the numbers of skiers on K2.

 I think you are dead-on but they were really the first major brand to go this route so it was high on the public's radar. Others have followed with little fuss.  I don't think the public perception is that they want to own K2 but won't buy due to production in China.  I do think that if they moved production to some other country like USA, Slovakia or Italy (a country where the production is "considered" high-quality) and marketed it as a "new" brand, they would have a better chance at the public taking them more seriously.  

post #39 of 50

I'll start with magazine and on line reviews.  Then I'll ask for input from people I ski with, both friends and instructors.  Finally, I look for good guidance from the sales people.  I like to purchase from shops near the mountain I ski so I can describe the trails and conditions that I ski and they can know exactly what I'm talking about and give good guidance as to what ski(s) would be the best choice given my priorities.

 

I really like the IDEA of demoing, but it has not really been the answer for me.  When I have demoed on demo days, it's only been a couple of runs and the terrain and conditions have been limited.  The greater limitation in my mind is that when taking a demo ski out I am demoing the tune as much as the ski.

post #40 of 50

Quote:

Originally Posted by hrspear View Post

 

I really like the IDEA of demoing, but it has not really been the answer for me.  When I have demoed on demo days, it's only been a couple of runs and the terrain and conditions have been limited.  The greater limitation in my mind is that when taking a demo ski out I am demoing the tune as much as the ski.

 

This is why I've focused on the two big early season (national tour) demo days here in Colo. front range:  the one at Loveland (Christy's) and the one at Keystone (CO Ski and Golf).  These are both part of the annual early season ski rep tour, with big brand reps prepping and describing their own ski lines.  These guys offer new skis near-perfectly tuned, thus eliminating most of the problems with demoing from ski or demo shops, where tunes can be haphazard or non-existent.  The reps also know their stuff.  

 

But demoing still has the limitations you describe, hrspear View Post   

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrspear View Post

I'll start with magazine and on line reviews.  Then I'll ask for input from people I ski with, both friends and instructors.  Finally, I look for good guidance from the sales people.  I like to purchase from shops near the mountain I ski so I can describe the trails and conditions that I ski and they can know exactly what I'm talking about and give good guidance as to what ski(s) would be the best choice given my priorities.

I really like the IDEA of demoing, but it has not really been the answer for me.  When I have demoed on demo days, it's only been a couple of runs and the terrain and conditions have been limited.  The greater limitation in my mind is that when taking a demo ski out I am demoing the tune as much as the ski.

I've found the same thing here. Their demo day has all the shops bring skis, so some skis are in more than one tent. I've loved a pair from one tent, skied another pair, come back to find the first pair of being demoed by someone, walked to another shop, got the "same" ski..... And had a totally different experience. Fortunately, I sensed it wasn't me and inquired about the tune. One shop tunes every ski the same. The other didn't. It makes me even more nitpicking about shop tunes than ever.
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrspear View Post
 

I'll start with magazine and on line reviews.  Then I'll ask for input from people I ski with, both friends and instructors.  Finally, I look for good guidance from the sales people.  I like to purchase from shops near the mountain I ski so I can describe the trails and conditions that I ski and they can know exactly what I'm talking about and give good guidance as to what ski(s) would be the best choice given my priorities.

 

I really like the IDEA of demoing, but it has not really been the answer for me.  When I have demoed on demo days, it's only been a couple of runs and the terrain and conditions have been limited.  The greater limitation in my mind is that when taking a demo ski out I am demoing the tune as much as the ski.

Regardless of the tune, I demo to see if the ski fits my style. If it washes a bit, I know it is the tune and that can be rectified with a little time on the bench. My main goal is to get a little feedback from the flex pattern, gauge the predictability of the ski in certain situations like dodging thin cover or FDB's and if it transitions to different snow conditions well. To clarify some things, I don't have a ski under 95mm in the waist and I don't generally like skiing groomers other than as a commute to better things. That being said, skiers know particularly what they are looking for in a ski. I find getting on them to be the best method for determining that for me. I used to read the reviews more and I concluded that nothing can substitute experiencing the ride for myself. For example, in 2003 or so all of the magazines and testers raved over the Salomon Pocket Rocket when it came out. Personally, it skied badly for me. That season I got on the Rossi B3 and Squad, the Fischer FX 106 and the Atomic Sugar Daddy's and found all of them to be much better for the way I ski. If I had listened to the reviews, I might have bought a ski that sucked for me. 

post #43 of 50
Do they match my eyes?!wink.gif
post #44 of 50

What is this brand doing for the future of our sport/recreational activity?

 

I don't buy from brands that don't protect the Brick and Mortar shops.

 

I don't buy from brands that don't support our future, or invest in it (which is most).  If they aren't putting back in, they are just sucking the life out with each purchase.

post #45 of 50
The question becomes the retailers themselves. I've learned that purchasing is based on the best ROI. Some retailers don't yet grasp that concept and complain about online shops stealing their business. The truth is that it is theirs to lose by making errors in how they treat their customers in this day and age. The manufacturers are wise enough to look for a functioning business model.

What it comes down to is a simple concept, work smarter or work harder, those that survive do both.
post #46 of 50
I want a quality local shop with customer servic we, knowledgeable staff and competitive prices. If we buy everything on line we'll loose them!
post #47 of 50

Consciously biased against anything that lacks imperfections; people, skis, cars, or food, so seldom go for #1 anything. React very negatively to lists and stars and viral buzz. Select few Epic members that I listen to, and then sieve out a discourse analysis of reviews - online or mag doesn't matter - for trends. Consistent cross-review use of terms like "powerful," for instance, or "lively." This entertains me.

 

Seldom demo anymore, would never buy something just because it's a deal, but also never pay full price. So usually I buy last year's skis. Care about graphics but only if they're too horrific to deal with at 7 am. Buy racing gear and boots at slope side shops, but skis mostly online.

post #48 of 50

If it says Stockli somewhere on the topsheet.

post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post


Or evil clowns. And evil clown skulls are the best.


Y'know, what we don't have are zombies, far as I know. Given that they're ubiquitous on TV, why no top sheet zombies? And then, of course, a zombie in a clown suit would take a real bite out of the competition...

post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 


Y'know, what we don't have are zombies, far as I know. Given that they're ubiquitous on TV, why no top sheet zombies? And then, of course, a zombie in a clown suit would take a real bite out of the competition...

Where can I sign up for a pair?

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