or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › A complete depletion of stoke
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A complete depletion of stoke - Page 3

post #61 of 73
Get a job outside of the industry and before long you'll be dreaming of skiing and going out every chance you can. It won't be often enough though since you'll only get 2 weeks of vacation a year!
Edited by cbtbakkes - 10/27/15 at 2:08pm
post #62 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbtbakkes View Post

Get a job outside of the industry and before long you'll be dreaming of skiing and going out every chance you can. It won't be often enough though since you'll only get 2 weeks of vacation a year!

I can assure you that if I actually left the industry I would never ski again. Pay for skiing? No thanks. Besides, I actually like working in the industry. I have zero beef with the sport, I just don't feel much like participating anymore. I'll ski just enough to stay relevant and spend the bulk of my free time doing other things. It's all good…..besides, I like taking my vacations in September. 

post #63 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShopGimp View Post
 

I can assure you that if I actually left the industry I would never ski again. Pay for skiing? No thanks. Besides, I actually like working in the industry. I have zero beef with the sport, I just don't feel much like participating anymore. I'll ski just enough to stay relevant and spend the bulk of my free time doing other things. It's all good…..besides, I like taking my vacations in September. 


Not trying to be judgmental here, but - honestly - do you feel that at one time you were really, truly, certifiably NUTS!!!! about skiing?

 

I know you said it's directed your life, but have you made physical choices, career choices, housing choices, girlfriend choices, family choices that simply ruled out more conventional avenues in life in favor of skiing as often as you could.

 

After nearly 40 years of skiing, I've made all of those choices.  First off, I still don't regret choosing skiing.  Secondly, while I find myself having second thoughts about RESORT skiing, there's no question at all that being on and in the snow is still the driving force in my life.  

 

It's hard for me to envision losing that.

 

Good luck with the dilemma. 

post #64 of 73
There's no dilemma. I stoke relatively lame shit all the time. It's pretty much the definition of the word.

Disdain and stoke make good antonyms. It is almost entirely an active, conscious, choice.

Personally, I'd be cautious about growing old with my scale tipping to disdain. It will grow.
post #65 of 73
The retail side of skiing without actually skiing would be a complete bummer. It'd have to suck the life out of about anyone.
post #66 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

The retail side of skiing without actually skiing would be a complete bummer. It'd have to suck the life out of about anyone.

It must be an anomaly for me. Most folks gotta clock in somewhere; I might as well do it in a toy box. I make pretty good coin at this stage of the game and it gives me the modest means of searching out the other fruits of the PNW lifestyle: rolling brown pow and chasing chrome. 

 

Allow me to downgrade my opinion of active participation in skiing from disdain to uninterested so we can all move along and look at weather models….apparently it's supposed to snow!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 


Not trying to be judgmental here, but - honestly - do you feel that at one time you were really, truly, certifiably NUTS!!!! about skiing?

 

I know you said it's directed your life, but have you made physical choices, career choices, housing choices, girlfriend choices, family choices that simply ruled out more conventional avenues in life in favor of skiing as often as you could.

 

After nearly 40 years of skiing, I've made all of those choices.  First off, I still don't regret choosing skiing.  Secondly, while I find myself having second thoughts about RESORT skiing, there's no question at all that being on and in the snow is still the driving force in my life.  

 

It's hard for me to envision losing that.

 

Good luck with the dilemma. 

At one time skiing and snowboarding was the driving force. I started working at a hill at 7:30 in the morning the day after I graduated from college…..mmmm, maybe working in a ski shop was the driving force. As I got older certain "distractions" got a toe hold, and now seem to have a kung-fu death grip. Skiing ain't a bad way to spend one's time, but you're more likely to find me tying flies, freezing my ass off in a river, or trying to squeeze a ride in somewhere than piling ski gear in the car and joining the procession up the mountain road. Like I eluded to earlier, working in the industry toy box is good enough for me these days. 

post #67 of 73

It's cyclical. I have been skiing on and off for almost 40 years. As a teen I skied quite a bit. After schooling and parents not paying anymore I took about 5 years off due to low finances. When I decided to come back in my mid 20s I was still "poor" so I tried out to be a ski instructor being on skis for literally the first time in 5 years or so and I made it! I taught skiing for about 8 years part time while working my full time job. I was flexible and willing as an instructor so the ski school booked me up anytime I was there. I would go months without making a free run, was just to tired after teaching for 8 hours. I became a trainer for the new hires during that time as well, having them shadow me during lessons. I had zero time to train to get full cert myself but skied with the L2s and L3s in clinics. Burnout crept in.

 

Then snowboarding hit. I tried that and my SSD saw me and all of a sudden I was getting booked with snowboard lessons. That gave me a fresh outlook. I actually enjoyed teaching snowboarding more than skiing so I did that for 5 years. I quickly got to the training new hires role with snowboarding as well. After a couple years of switching skis and board I stopped skiing and just rode and taught SB exclusively for a couple years.

 

Then I went back to school so I cut my teaching hours. After I graduated, finding a job was tough so I started my own business. My wife was also pregnant. I had to give up teaching. I took that season off after we had our son. I skied a handful of times a year until my son was 4. Took him to Crested Butte on vacation and skied with him. I sold my snowboard gear and went back to skiing 100%. My wife gave up skiing after our son was born (except the Crested Butte trip) and hasn't been back.

 

Since then we have had night passes to our local hill and I took my "daddy trip" (or two) out west each season. Last season I took off from my western trip(s) so we could spend a month in Marco Island Florida this past summer fishing, kayaking, pool swimming and beaching it. That was our last chance to do that as a family, so we did. From here on our son will be to busy during the summer training for the high school soccer team (very competitive AAA school). I also starting teaching myself to play guitar during this time as well.

 

Now I am back. Full season pass to the local place this year (skiing 3-4 mornings a week) and going to the Aspen gathering. I know that isn't as much as some, but that's my reality right now. Maybe when we are empty nesters we can spend a month or two out west each year. We will see.

 

I find one dimensional people boring. I have quite a few interests. I meet and interact with people of similar interests. But when somebody only "knows" one thing, I find them boring to be around. Even if they are  the authority in that area. Sometimes different interests take over as priority for a while. I like that. Don't be as skiing savant. Be multi dimensional. If that means taking some time away from the sport from time to time, so be it.


Edited by MattL - 10/30/15 at 6:21am
post #68 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL View Post
 

It's cyclical. I have been skiing on and off for almost 40 years. As a teen I skied quite a bit. After schooling and parents not paying anymore I took about 5 years off due to low finances. When I decided to come back in my mid 20s I was still "poor" so I tried out to be a ski instructor being on skis for literally the first time in 5 years or so and I made it! I taught skiing for about 8 years part time while working my full time job. I was flexible and willing as an instructor so the ski school booked me up anytime I was there. I would go months without making a free run, was just to tired after teaching for 8 hours. I became a trainer for the new hires during that time as well, having them shadow me during lessons. I had zero time to train to get full cert myself but skied with the L2s and L3s in clinics. Burnout crept in.

 

Then snowboarding hit. I tried that and my SSD saw me and all of a sudden I was getting booked with snowboard lessons. That gave me a fresh outlook. I actually enjoyed teaching snowboarding more than skiing so I did that for 5 years. I quickly got to the training new hires role with snowboarding as well. After a couple years of switching skis and board I stopped skiing and just rode and taught SB exclusively for a couple years.

 

Then I went back to school so I cut my teaching hours. After I graduated, finding a job was tough so I started my own business. My wife was also pregnant. I had to give up teaching. I took that season off after we had our son. I skied a handful of times a year until my son was 4. Took him to Crested Butte on vacation and skied with him. I sold my snowboard gear and went back to skiing 100%. My wife gave up skiing after our son was born (except the Crested Butte trip) and hasn't been back.

 

Since then we have had night passes to our local hill and I took my "daddy trip" (or two) out west each season. Last season I took off from my western trip(s) so we could spend a month in Marco Island Florida this past summer fishing, kayaking, pool swimming and beaching it. That was our last chance to do that as a family, so we did. From here on our son will be to busy during the summer training for the high school soccer team (very competitive AAA school). I also starting teaching myself to play guitar during this time as well.

 

Now I am back. Full season pass to the local place this year (skiing 3-4 mornings a week) and going to the Aspen gathering. I know that isn't as much as some, but that's my reality right now. Maybe when we are empty nesters we can spend a month or two out west each year. We will see.

 

I find one dimensional people boring. I have quite a few interests. I meet and interact with people of similar interests. But when somebody only "knows" one thing, I find them boring to be around. Even if they are  the authority in that area. Sometimes different interests take over as priority for a while. I like that. Don't be as skiing savant. Be multi dimensional. If that means taking some time away from the sport from time to time, so be it.

Or it could be a brain tumor.  Best get that checked out. 

post #69 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Or it could be a brain tumor.  Best get that checked out. 

 

 

Very well could be. Does Dr. Ghost prescribe moving to Colorado and using Cannabis Oil to cure it? Can't be too safe, right?

post #70 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Or it could be a brain tumor.  Best get that checked out. 

 

 

Very well could be. Does Dr. Ghost prescribe moving to Colorado and using Cannabis Oil to cure it? Can't be too safe, right?


Only if it doesn't show up in an MRI.

post #71 of 73

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShopGimp View Post
 

What does one do when he/she can't shake a creeping disdain for the one sport that has clearly driven the direction of his/her life. The stoke is burning out and the skier in me is dying. 

Day-trip non-extreme see if you can ski it might make skiing enjoyable for you again. The Medford OR area has a lot of interesting terrain: Mount McLoughlin; east face of Brown Mountain; Old Baldy and Grizzly Peak. Walk up 300 to 700 feet and ski down.

 

        

post #72 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool47 View Post
 

Day-trip non-extreme see if you can ski it might make skiing enjoyable for you again. The Medford OR area has a lot of interesting terrain: Mount McLoughlin; east face of Brown Mountain; Old Baldy and Grizzly Peak. Walk up 300 to 700 feet and ski down.

 

        

Ha-Ha! Thanks, but if I was going to get that "creative" I think I'd go the fat bike route! 

post #73 of 73
Thread Starter 

I guess it just took some shiny new gear: RX130, Powertrack 89, Pivot 14…….I just might ski more than the value of my pass this season. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › A complete depletion of stoke