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Mogul skis?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I want to focus on moguls a lot this year as I try to improve from high-intermediate to advanced skier.  Plan to be at Winter Park & Mary Jane for most of my ski days this year to work on bumps.  Don't own my own skis yet so will be demoing mostly.  They appear to have a good number of demo skis to choose from at WP, based on their website.

 

I'm 5'10" 180 lbs.

 

I assume I should go for shorter skis with soft tip and hard tail, but don't have enough experience on bumps to gauge width and length to start out with.  Any help on good mogul skis and advice on what sizes to try, based on my size and lack of bump experience? 

post #2 of 22

At your level, getting better a mogul skiing is more about technique tan the gear. If you need skis, I wouldn't immediately just right in and get a mogul specific ski, they are not the most versatile skis on the hill but I would look to a narrower all mountain ski with the first ones that come to mind are the Blizzard Latigo and Nordica NRGy80, two skis that have some early rise in the tip and tail which allow them to approach bumps and release on the backsides real smoothly. I would stay about head height with the length. 

post #3 of 22

^^^This, might throw in last year's Head REV85, 177 cm, to the mix since you're in places that reward float at times. 

post #4 of 22

What Phil said.

 

I would also consider the Blizzard Bushwacker, as I think it's a bit more versatile, if this is going to be the only ski you own.

 

I would recommend using the same skis in the same size throughout the season, or at least once you find something that you like.  It will allow you to focus on your technique.  I would also strongly suggest bump specific lessons or clinics.  Skiing bumps is mostly just about good skiing (balanced position, absorbing terrain variations while keeping your skis pointing where you want them to go, speed control, etc), and weaknesses in your technique, skillset, or fitness (there is a certain amount that strength and natural quickness can allow you to get away with) will be revealed by a bumpfield.   

post #5 of 22

^^^^ Yes, should have also thought of this. Great all mountain bump ski, forgiving but grows with user, will give you a bit more in soft snow, bit less on hardpack. And ditto on both previous comments about lessons. You can ski bumps - or most other "difficult" terrain - on a whole lot of skis if you know how. If you don't, the specific ski becomes less relevant. 

post #6 of 22

here is the guess: soft ski for bumps till you get some techniques.. so any park ski with 70 underfoot should be "ok".

Get used and cheap, throw it away after a season or so.

Am I correct? (personally, not very good in bumps).

post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg S View Post

here is the guess: soft ski for bumps till you get some techniques.. so any park ski with 70 underfoot should be "ok".
Get used and cheap, throw it away after a season or so.
Am I correct? (personally, not very good in bumps).

Not really. You need to learn to make consistent short turns outside the bumps to make them in the bumps. The Nrgy 80 Phil mentioned above is a great choice, and for $499 MAP, it's a screaming deal on an excellent ski than many would mistake as a lesser ski because of it's lesser sticker price.
post #8 of 22

Bushwhacker is a fine choice but I think the Latigo is a better one, in the upper 80/90mm range, Scott's The Ski is the benchmark. Speaking of Scott, The Black Majic at 77mm is a great option too. 

 

If you want to get a feel of what a real bump ski is like but don't want to break the bank, find a 175-180 junior GS ski. It will be about the same shape as a modern mogul ski (the Hart F17 Classic is basically a GS ski), take off the race plates and mount the bindings 3-4cm forward of the suggested mount line. Be prepared to be glued to the zipper line and hold on. 

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrspear View Post
 

What Phil said.

 

I would also consider the Blizzard Bushwacker, as I think it's a bit more versatile, if this is going to be the only ski you own.

 

I would recommend using the same skis in the same size throughout the season, or at least once you find something that you like.  It will allow you to focus on your technique.  I would also strongly suggest bump specific lessons or clinics.  Skiing bumps is mostly just about good skiing (balanced position, absorbing terrain variations while keeping your skis pointing where you want them to go, speed control, etc), and weaknesses in your technique, skillset, or fitness (there is a certain amount that strength and natural quickness can allow you to get away with) will be revealed by a bumpfield.   

Yes, I had already planned to take at least a couple full-day bump clinics at Mary Jane this season.  Having barely had more than an introduction to bumps with an instructor, I definitely wanted someone advising and observing over a longer session, until I get the hang of it.

post #10 of 22
Since you want to '' focus on moguls a lot this year '' you may choose to attack the moguls with a moguls specific ski rather then with an all mountain ski as suggested above.Why don't you have a look at the '' Volkl Wall Mogul '' It is an wood core, metal free ski with a carbon reinforcement. It's on the softer side overall, but performs extreamly well in moguls and corresponds (more or less) to your current level.
post #11 of 22

Another vote for Scott's The Ski. They're like silk in the bumps. And elsewhere. 

 

I also really liked the Head i.Supershape Titan in bumps. I think it skis softer than it is. 

 

$.02 on bump skis...I'm not sure going with a purpose-built bump skis makes sense, especially as your primary skis. You want to be comfortable in bumps on your daily driver, and there are so many skis that do well on so much terrain, including bumps. If you aren't a truly dedicated zipperliner, true bump ski seems like a 4th or 5th priority quiver addition, and not a primary ski. 


Edited by LiveJazz - 10/20/15 at 2:41pm
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiveJazz View Post

Another vote for Scott's The Ski. They're like silk in the bumps. And elsewhere. 



 



I also really liked the Head i.Supershape Titan in bumps. I think it skis softer than it is. 



 



$.02 on bump skis...I'm not sure going with a purpose-built bump skis makes sense, especially as your primary skis. You want to be comfortable in bumps on your daily driver, and there are so many skis that do well on so much terrain, including bumps. If you aren't a truly dedicated zipperliner, true bump ski seems like a 4th or 5th priority quiver addition, and not a primary ski. 


 


Op wanted some advise on '' good mogul skis '' and not on good all mountain or frontside biased skis as the models suggested above.He intends to spend most of his time in mogul fields so it wouldn't hurt to do so on a mogul specific model.Of course he may also choose to demo or puchase some all mountain tools as well.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bogatyr View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiveJazz View Post
 

Another vote for Scott's The Ski. They're like silk in the bumps. And elsewhere. 

 

 

 

I also really liked the Head i.Supershape Titan in bumps. I think it skis softer than it is. 

 

 

 

$.02 on bump skis...I'm not sure going with a purpose-built bump skis makes sense, especially as your primary skis. You want to be comfortable in bumps on your daily driver, and there are so many skis that do well on so much terrain, including bumps. If you aren't a truly dedicated zipperliner, true bump ski seems like a 4th or 5th priority quiver addition, and not a primary ski. 

 


Op wanted some advise on '' good mogul skis '' and not on good all mountain or frontside biased skis as the models suggested above.He intends to spend most of his time in mogul fields so it wouldn't hurt to do so on a mogul specific model.Of course he may also choose to demo or puchase some all mountain tools as well.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Bushwhacker is a fine choice but I think the Latigo is a better one, in the upper 80/90mm range, Scott's The Ski is the benchmark. Speaking of Scott, The Black Majic at 77mm is a great option too. 

 

If you want to get a feel of what a real bump ski is like but don't want to break the bank, find a 175-180 junior GS ski. It will be about the same shape as a modern mogul ski (the Hart F17 Classic is basically a GS ski), take off the race plates and mount the bindings 3-4cm forward of the suggested mount line. Be prepared to be glued to the zipper line and hold on. 

I think Phil's post sums it up. The OP isn't an accomplished skier looking to get competitive in bumps--he's an intermediate with the same technique problems in the bumps many of us have, and will learn just as quickly on the right all-mountain ski as on a mogul-specific ski. He also has no other skis and after a couple of hours practicing bumps most likely he's going to want to ski the rest of the mountain. I've seen plenty of skiers do great in the bumps on stiff skis, fat skis, all kinds of skis. I also think moguls are an area where a lesson is particularly helpful--there are some mogul specific techniques I've learned that have helped me a lot, and all the practice in the world won't help if you're doing it wrong.

post #14 of 22
Volkl Wall Mogul are rated as intermediate (metal free) ski capable to complete tasks outside the mogul field as well.
post #15 of 22

maybee try the hart classic they come in two choices

post #16 of 22
Even though MJ is known for its mogul skiing, if you check out the shop at the base of MJ, you may find that bump-specific skis are conspicuously absent. You won't see hardly any in the lift lines either. People use whatever they've got, which is mostly 90-100 rockered thingies, which are probably not optimum. Go with Phil's advice.
post #17 of 22

A dedicated bump ski is all but useless anywhere but the bumps (in which they are fantastic).  Very straight (BIG radius) and very soft.

I have a friend that was a national team mogul skier and he never skis his bump skis anymore, opting to all mountain orientated (or race when doing masters) offerings.

post #18 of 22

Am not a person that has skied lots of mogul skis.  Am an old smooth controlled speed rec bump skier and haven't been in Colorado for decades.  But the most popular bump skis at Mary Jane are supposedly Twisters that speaks huge to what serious bump skiers think.   I own the 2011 model that at 168cm has a 64mm waist (little me 66" 140#) .  It is ideal if one is not too heavy or into pounding down bumps with speed like pros.  For that one needs beefier sticks.  Twisters readily make short stable turns in the weird 3-D world that are mogul fields for a centered skier.

post #19 of 22

Here's what I have for bump specific, K2 Cabrawler in a 179.  Some love them, some hate them.  They get criticized as being too grabby and needing to be detuned.  I really like them, even for just hardpack and cord cruising.  They do well for moderate speed turns on cord too, hold better at highs speed than a SL (too squirlly at speed), bit not quite as well as my GS skis do.  They are also a decent park ski.  I've got very light 977 composite bindings on them as well, flat. 

 

Quote:
 
Tip/Waist/Tail Widths: 92/66/82mm
Tail Profile: Flared
Turn Radius: 21-29
Actual Turn Radius @ Specified Length: 23m (@ 169cm)
Special Features: Mogul Specific
Warranty: One Year
Skill Range: Expert-Pro
Model Year: 2007
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Bushwhacker is a fine choice but I think the Latigo is a better one, in the upper 80/90mm range, Scott's The Ski is the benchmark. Speaking of Scott, The Black Majic at 77mm is a great option too. 

 

If you want to get a feel of what a real bump ski is like but don't want to break the bank, find a 175-180 junior GS ski. It will be about the same shape as a modern mogul ski (the Hart F17 Classic is basically a GS ski), take off the race plates and mount the bindings 3-4cm forward of the suggested mount line. Be prepared to be glued to the zipper line and hold on. 


Latigo has metal and imho is too stiff for bumps this based on someone, expert skier  who is 200lbs and says the ski bucks them in moguls.

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave_SSS View Post
 

.......But the most popular bump skis at Mary Jane are supposedly Twisters that speaks huge to what serious bump skiers think.   I own the 2011 model that at 168cm has a 64mm waist (little me 66" 140#) .  It is ideal if one is not too heavy or into pounding down bumps with speed like pros.  For that one needs beefier sticks.  

 

Deneen was using twister before Dynastar decided to obsolete the model. Then Dynastar had second thoughts and kept producing the ski with different top skin. Not sure on the real story but at the time Dynastar and K2 got out of sponsorships, Hart took over this void. 

 

 

 Many years ago, I was on the fence about getting a dedicated mogul ski, but someone convince me that it would force me to use techniques needed to make a mogul turn. It turns out he was right. Any one wanting to get better in the moguls need to spend time in them. The geom is right, narrow tips to aim in tight formation bumps and narrow waist to make quick turns. Having the center mount allows more tail length so that it could be used as a lever to get out of the back seat. And it handles fine in NE hardpack..... that's all I have been skiing when going to a mogul field.

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack97 View Post
 

 

 

 

 Many years ago, I was on the fence about getting a dedicated mogul ski, but someone convince me that it would force me to use techniques needed to make a mogul turn. It turns out he was right. Any one wanting to get better in the moguls need to spend time in them. The geom is right, narrow tips to aim in tight formation bumps and narrow waist to make quick turns. Having the center mount allows more tail length so that it could be used as a lever to get out of the back seat. And it handles fine in NE hardpack..... that's all I have been skiing when going to a mogul field.

 

+1, and light weight helps for quicker feet when needed.

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