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First time buying skis, what's the best Mid Atlantic one ski quiver?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hey guys I'm currently in the market for my first pair of ski's and I'm looking for a one ski quiver for New Jersey the Poconos mostly and occasionally Vermont so lots of ice.

Because my home mountain is Mountain Creek in New Jersey I'm mainly skiing groomers and the occasional mogul field. I also plan on getting more into the park this year but just jumps no rails or boxes. But it's important that I have a ski that is good in powder and in the trees because when I go to Vermont I love being off piste in the side country. 

I ski at my home mountain about 11 or so times a year about 5 more days somewhere else in the Poconos and this your I'm going for a 5 day trip up to sugar bush with the possibility of another 2 days at killing ton. So I'm looking at about 21 or so day this year. 

I consider myself to be an intermediate to advanced skier. I can ski every run in the Poconos and black diamonds in Vermont. Double blacks in Vermont if its a powder day and I'm just starting to get into glade skiing. My only caveat is that I'm skiing on hand-me-down atomic E:N+ skis with a length of 148. I don't have much confidence to charge in this ski because it is to short of a ski and when I do charge I tend to go over the handlebars. So with a proper length ski like the rentals I used to use I am I slightly more aggressive skier then what I am currently.

I am 5' 8.5" and 160 lbs but I go to the gym so next season I will probably be at 175lbs.


After much research the ski I am most interested in is the Salomon Q85 in a 167 or 174 length. This ski has a pretty narrow waist with but still wide enough and featuring a rocker camber rocker profile to get float in the soft stuff. This ski also has a short turn radius at 15m for the 174 length and 13.6 for the 167 length ski which might ease my transition back into a longer ski and help me out in the trees and moguls. I'm looking for a ski that can help me advance and that I can keep for a long time as a one ski quiver that I can take with me wherever I go. Do you guys think this is a good ski for what I am looking for? Also I can buy a 2015 model for a cheaper price there shouldn't be much of a change between years other then the graphics right? I'm looking forward to feedback so thanks in advance for the help.

post #2 of 11

K2 Shreditor 92 and Volkl are a couple of park/all mountain hybrids that are solid all over the mountain

post #3 of 11
The Q85 is a good choice, a solid ski that will do what you want. Another good ski for an eastern ski is the Head Rev 85, discontinued now so there should be some bargains to be had. Either of those is also a good ski for western skiing. I think the Head is slightly better on groomers but the Q85 is slightly better in the trees. WIth either ski, you should get on a mid 170 length.
post #4 of 11

Planning to gain 15 lbs of muscle in a year, huh? Excellent. Anyway, I'm 6', 165, ski VT, NH, and out west, mostly. As much as I respect both those skis, neither would be my top choice for VT; you want something that really shrugs off ice and they're both optimized for normal to softer snow.

 

So for a OSQ, lighter skier, IMO you need a Fischer (some great deals right now on last season's Motive 86), or a Blizzard (ditto deals on last year's Blizzard 8.5Ti). Nordica Steadfasts might work too, if you can find any. 

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Planning to gain 15 lbs of muscle in a year, huh? Excellent. Anyway, I'm 6', 165, ski VT, NH, and out west, mostly. As much as I respect both those skis, neither would be my top choice for VT; you want something that really shrugs off ice and they're both optimized for normal to softer snow.

 

So for a OSQ, lighter skier, IMO you need a Fischer (some great deals right now on last season's Motive 86), or a Blizzard (ditto deals on last year's Blizzard 8.5Ti). Nordica Steadfasts might work too, if you can find any. 

 

IMHO it sounds like OP is taking a more playful approach to the mountain that would be well suited to the Q85/Volkl Bridge/Shreditor. While Motive 86/Blizzar 8.5ti are great skis, they seem more technical, and carving-oriented than what OP is after. A nice compromise might be a Blizzard Bushwacker. 

 

What else to consider... Nordica NRGY90? Kastle James XX90? Lots of good options in the ~85-90 waist, playful twin tip. An older Line Prophet 90 would fit the bill nicely I think.

post #6 of 11

^^^^ Well, yep parts of his post indicate that, yet his first sentence talks about "lots of ice." IME, the quickest way to ruin a high intermediate's day back east is to have him/her on a "playful" ski that's undermatched to firm and ice, either by design or tune. We're all heroes in soft snow. Just sayin'.

 

The skis I suggested, especially the Motive, are not beefy or expert-only skis. In the opinion of many, it'd be considered forgiving. Just a bit better on hardback than the REV or Sollie. 

post #7 of 11
As far as ice, I'd lean more towards the Sollie XDrive 8.3 or 8.8 than the Q85.
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

I may have over blown it when I said lots of Ice they groom pretty well at mountain creek it's my fault for not specifying that, in the beginning of the season its icy and the occasional mid season melt but its mostly a hard pack groomer that gets chopped up during the day with some icy sections on the steeper slopes and especially the moguls. I try to avoid going if the reports are icy or I know we had a recent thaw without any new snow, but living down here you just cant expect perfect conditions. Id say the conditions at Mtn Creek is well groomed trails in the morning becoming chopped up by the afternoon and icy sections developing or being uncovered on blue or lower trails with about 75% being crud and 25% exposed ice or ice covered in crud. The black diamond trails I know to get rather Icy but they are pretty short and not much of a challenge so the ice is never really a deal breaker just an added challenge.

Yeah I'm looking for a ski that's more playful and not really a carver but stable enough for me to just charge a slope when need be. I've looked at the supernatural 92's since line no longer makes the prophet but I was kind of turned off by the waist width I wasn't sure If they could handle ice very well since I know line tends to cater toward more powder friendly ski's is the prophet series better then the supernaturals? I'll definitely give what you guys said a look. I also plan on keeping the shorties that I have now for those icy days since they do pretty we'll for me here at creek now, so I wan't a ski that can handle ice when I'm need them to but nothing orientated towards ice if that helps. This is more of a one ski quiver for trips to Vermont and possibly out west but I wan't to be able to use it as my main ski to help me improve, the Q85s stood out to me because reviews said this ski can make short carving turns but has the ability to modulate the turn radius well and maybe get me more comfortable at charging the hill so I can eventually by a pair of groomer orientated carving ski's and I won't be thrown from a narrow turning 148 size ski to a 170 with a wide turn radius. I'm kind of looking for a ski that will help me tie everything together if that makes sense.

post #9 of 11
Supernaturals are the replacements to the prophets. Great ski, but agree that it may be a bit fatter than you need for an eastern OSQ.  Sadly the do not make it in an 82 -- but something like that, twin-tipped, shorter turn radius, a bit of metal for edge grip would be a nice OSQ for you. 
 
Is riding switch important? 
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmeb View Post
 



I currently know how to ride switch okay and would like to have the ability to, but If I can get a much better ski that's single tip I'm willing to loose the ability to ski switch as I don't ski switch that often. 

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

^^^^ Well, yep parts of his post indicate that, yet his first sentence talks about "lots of ice." IME, the quickest way to ruin a high intermediate's day back east is to have him/her on a "playful" ski that's undermatched to firm and ice, either by design or tune. We're all heroes in soft snow. Just sayin'.

 

The skis I suggested, especially the Motive, are not beefy or expert-only skis. In the opinion of many, it'd be considered forgiving. Just a bit better on hardback than the REV or Sollie. 

 

Thumbs Up to what Beyond thinks!
I ski the Q85's big brother the Q98. Love it in soft snow, but, just fight it eastern hard conditions at my home Pa. Blue Mtn. ski area. The edge hold is just now there and I just let the skis skid through a turn. Often in this forum, skis are described as hard snow biased or soft snow biased, the Salomon Q series clearly falls into the soft snow category. For me, it's a no-brainer in a OSQ, you buy for the conditions most encountered, and, then use technique when going into stuff we ski occasionally. Tree and powder skiing are a lot more about technique and experience than the ski you happen to be on. A mid 80 ski with a hard snow bias will serve you far better than a Q series.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › First time buying skis, what's the best Mid Atlantic one ski quiver?