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Is binding torque testing necessary?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Ski shops seem to tout their high tech binding torque testing devices and recommend that bindings are torque tested regularly and whenever bindings are adjusted. However, I've never seen rental skis torque tested before the skis leave the shop. Considering liability, if rental skis aren't tested why would any other bindings need it?

post #2 of 9

It is touted because it is required in their contract with the binding manufacturers. The DIN window gives you a point of reference it is not always accurate, they only way you can know of the binding is correcting at the right Nm it to torque test it. As far as your question on rental skis, yes they get tested, usually at the beginning of the year and should be tested every X days out on snow. 

post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prosper View Post
 

Ski shops seem to tout their high tech binding torque testing devices and recommend that bindings are torque tested regularly and whenever bindings are adjusted. However, I've never seen rental skis torque tested before the skis leave the shop. Considering liability, if rental skis aren't tested why would any other bindings need it?


I'm not sure about all rental skis but I know the rental managers I've talked to say that they go over the skis thoroughly on a regular basis.  For sure they check forward pressure every time they're sent out for rent. 

post #4 of 9

Yes, rental skis are torque tested.  

 

For example, I know with Vail Resorts every single rental ski is torque tested before the beginning of the season (take a second and try to think about how many pairs of skis that is... staggering).  During the season each rental location is responsible for torque testing a percentage of their fleet and a percentage of "recently rented skis" every week.  I would estimate a single pair of rental skis is torque tested at least 3-4 times in a single season.

 

Logistically it wouldn't be possible to torque test a binding every time it was rented, but they go through thorough visual inspection, etc, every time a ski is rented or returned.  

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

You learn something new everyday. If a binding doesn't torque test to the reading on the DIN window is it taken out of service or is a note made so the tech can adjust the DIN setting accordingly every time that ski goes out?

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prosper View Post
 

You learn something new everyday. If a binding doesn't torque test to the reading on the DIN window is it taken out of service or is a note made so the tech can adjust the DIN setting accordingly every time that ski goes out?

 

At the demo centre where I work, if the binding fails the torque test the ski would be removed from the rental fleet until a new binding can be mounted. I don't know if new bindings are tested at the start of the season but there are torque tests done throughout the season on the rental fleet.

 

Also at the start of each season, anyone who is paid to be on skis (mostly instructors and patrol) must get their skis torque tested (at no charge) prior to being issued their staff pass. I do know of at least one instance when a veteran patrol's bindings failed but he was given a torque test pass by the shop tech and he was allowed crank up the Din but was told that for the next season he would need to show up with bindings that would pass the test.

post #7 of 9

I have never torque tested a binding, except for testing by my highly calibrated knees and hips.  I see no need to know if a 7 releases at the "official 7" when I'm going to  decide to set it at 6,7,8,9 - whatever, based on my knees and hips and amount of prerelease/nonrelease I experience,   Even if you use a chart, you are given chioces (I, II, III, III+, etc.).   I occasionally ski Tyrolia 490s at speed (the pre-Delrin ones that were all-metal - I wouldn't ski a plastic binding that old).

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

I have never torque tested a binding, except for testing by my highly calibrated knees and hips.  I see no need to know if a 7 releases at the "official 7" when I'm going to  decide to set it at 6,7,8,9 - whatever, based on my knees and hips and amount of prerelease/nonrelease I experience,   Even if you use a chart, you are given chioces (I, II, III, III+, etc.).   I occasionally ski Tyrolia 490s at speed (the pre-Delrin ones that were all-metal - I wouldn't ski a plastic binding that old).

 

Torque testing imo is all about legal liability. In my experience a pair of skis will wear out and be useless long before its binding.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

I have never torque tested a binding, except for testing by my highly calibrated knees and hips.  I see no need to know if a 7 releases at the "official 7" when I'm going to  decide to set it at 6,7,8,9 - whatever, based on my knees and hips and amount of prerelease/nonrelease I experience,   Even if you use a chart, you are given chioces (I, II, III, III+, etc.).   I occasionally ski Tyrolia 490s at speed (the pre-Delrin ones that were all-metal - I wouldn't ski a plastic binding that old).

 

Torque testing imo is all about legal liability. In my experience a pair of skis will wear out and be useless long before its binding.

 

 

Wow.    NOT my experience, and I have gouges in my ceiling, a wonky shoulder, and ~8 pairs of skis looking for bindings to show the difference.

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