or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The best technical advice - Page 6

post #151 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unpiste View Post
 


This sounds like an excellent tip, but could you explain what "CA" and "CB" stand for / mean?

 


Sorry, I use those abbreviations so routinely I've forgotten they're not part of common usage for all skiers.  So thanks for asking.  CA = counteracting, which means turning the torso (from the hips up) in the opposite direction the skis are turning (as opposed to being square to the skis).  CB = counterbalancing, which means tipping the torso (from the hips up) in the opposite direction the skis are tipping (so even in a high-angled turned, your torso -- hips included -- will be level, or nearly so).  So I suppose you could call CA "counter-turning", and CB "counter-tipping".   You can see both of these especially clearly in the 2nd pic in this post http://www.epicski.com/t/143149/the-best-technical-advice/120#post_1933154

 

But those are added details to the tip which, upon further thought, I think I can now better summarize:  The ability to balance comfortably on one ski isn't just one of several skills it's good to have; rather, it's the thing that needs to be in place in order for all the other skills to work.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unpiste View Post

 

For bonus points, what exactly do you mean by "you want to be able to initiate and regulate the turns by continuous tipping of the inside foot"? If you're balanced on the outside ski and can lift the inside at any point, what exactly is the inside ski controlling? (This may be clearer while actually skiing, but it sounds contradictory in writing.)

That's an excellent question, but unfortunately opens up a whole can of worms, and deserves a separate thread (indeed, there have been a few on this, e.g.,http://www.epicski.com/t/141727/inside-tipping-and-outside-engagement).  But, briefly, the idea is that tipping the inside foot activates the base of a kinetic chain that in turn causes your inside knee, and then your femur, then your hip to move into the turn, which then gets the outside ski up on edge as a reaction, without your having to directly tip the outside ski (you just allow it to follow the inside)  Why is this important?  Well, you really want parallel shins, and the outside ski naturally tips in more easily than the inside (leading to an A-frame), so if you focus specifically on the inside, the outside will just take care of itself. The other idea is that you want "angles before pressure," so this approach allows you to set up your angles, in a balanced way, so you can then be ready to receive the pressure as the turn develops. I.e., you don't want to actively push on a non-angled outside ski at the top of the turn, because that can cause a pivot-skid.  The summary is the inside ski provides the active guidance, the outside the stable platform.  

 

[Some of you will recognize the ideas in this post as coming from he-who-shall-not-be-named.  I find this state of affairs unfortunate since, if you're going to share someone's ideas, under normal circumstances you'd want to give them explicit credit, and he certainly deserves credit for these; IMO they're innovative.  OTOH, he also certainly bears a significant  portion of the responsibility for the current situation.  In any event: Unpiste, if you want more info, PM me.]


Edited by chemist - 11/5/15 at 10:26pm
post #152 of 178

Or in more abbreviated form, CB = 2 and CA = 4

 

post #153 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

He was a terrible mathematician, compared to Hendrick.:duel:


You're really bored, aren't you Ghost?   ;)

post #154 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

Or in more abbreviated form, CB = 2 and CA = 4

 


I would have put the arrows for 2 and 4 at the hips, since (as I'm sure you know) it's common to get "pseudo-CB" (i.e., that doesn't involve the hips, leaving them non-level) by laterally bending the spine, and pseudo-CA" (that doesn't involve the hips, leaving them square to the skis) by twisting the spine.


Edited by chemist - 11/5/15 at 5:25pm
post #155 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

He was a terrible mathematician, compared to Hendrick.:duel:


You're really bored, aren't you Ghost?   ;)


How could you tell?  I read this book a long time ago,

https://books.google.ca/books?id=YLsSxQqEww0C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

It's as good a read today as it was in 1920.

I can't say where exactly, but I have read Albert expressing his gratitude for Hendricks assistance.

I guess you could say, "He sucked at math, but he sucked at a higher level. ":D

It's all relative.

post #156 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

Or in more abbreviated form, CB = 2 and CA = 4

 


I would have put the arrows for 2 and 4 at the hips, since (as I'm sure you know) it's common to get "pseudo-CB" (i.e., that doesn't involve the hips, leaving them non-level) by laterally bending the spine, and pseudo-CA" (that doesn't involve the hips, leaving them square to the skis) by twisting the spine.


not really "pseudo"... just to be a stickler, since i ended up doing a lot of research over the summer: CB is not really defined to be at the hips only :) although using the pelvis properly is indeed considered the more refined version, of course...

 

 

 

cheers

 

:duel: 

 

p.s. in reality i'm just not that good with powerpoint ;)


Edited by razie - 11/5/15 at 7:22pm
post #157 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
 
I would have put the arrows for 2 and 4 at the hips, since (as I'm sure you know) it's common to get "pseudo-CB" (i.e., that doesn't involve the hips, leaving them non-level) by laterally bending the spine, and pseudo-CA" (that doesn't involve the hips, leaving them square to the skis) by twisting the spine.

 

Including the hip super charges the CA and CB?

post #158 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

It does sound odd.  Just give it a try.  

 

The inside foot/leg/ski has to be "worked" in order to keep it out of the way of the outside ski/foot/leg, but that's not all you can do with the inside foot/leg/ski.  Think of the inside foot as the brains of the turn, and the outside foot as the brawn that does the heavy lifting.  The inside foot (or leg) does something, and the outside foot/leg in response receives the task of carrying the weight.  

 

"Working" the inside foot/ski/leg in a good way triggers the outside ski to do its thing just right.  But when people focus primarily on the outside ski, all kinds of bad stuff happens-- stems, sequential turn entries, and pushing on the outside ski which creates all kinds of bad results.  However, tipping the inside foot triggers simultaneous turn entries and eliminates stemming.  Bending the inside knee to lighten that inside ski creates the angles that so many people admire.  Keeping the inside foot up under the inside hip keeps one balanced on the outside ski.  "Working" the whole "inside half" of the body is the way to go.   

 

Ooooo, me likey. Skiing is an "ing" sport. TippiING  constantly. FlexING. ExtendING. Parking and riding it is passive and dumb.

 

Nice. Funny, when we walk, the weighted foot keeps the balance.

 

The other foot needs to be swingING forward. Without it doing its thang, forward movement stops.

 

Neato. Liquidity, eh?

post #159 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 
It does sound odd.  Just give it a try.  

 

The inside foot/leg/ski has to be "worked" in order to keep it out of the way of the outside ski/foot/leg, but that's not all you can do with the inside foot/leg/ski.  Think of the inside foot as the brains of the turn, and the outside foot as the brawn that does the heavy lifting.  The inside foot (or leg) does something, and the outside foot/leg in response receives the task of carrying the weight.  

 

"Working" the inside foot/ski/leg in a good way triggers the outside ski to do its thing just right.  But when people focus primarily on the outside ski, all kinds of bad stuff happens-- stems, sequential turn entries, and pushing on the outside ski which creates all kinds of bad results.  However, tipping the inside foot triggers simultaneous turn entries and eliminates stemming.  Bending the inside knee to lighten that inside ski creates the angles that so many people admire.  Keeping the inside foot up under the inside hip keeps one balanced on the outside ski.  "Working" the whole "inside half" of the body is the way to go.   

 

I just say it's magic.  You want most of your weight on your outside ski and most of your attention on your inside ski.

post #160 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 


not really "pseudo"... just to be a stickler, since i ended up doing a lot of research over the summer: CB is not really defined to be at the hips only :) although using the pelvis properly is indeed considered the more refined version, of course...

 

cheers

 

:duel: 

 

p.s. in reality i'm just not that good with powerpoint ;)

Being a stickler is welcome; it's important to be precise about this stuff.  To be a stickler myself, I'd maintain it is pseudo when the hips aren't involved.    I agree that CB (and CA)  is not hips-only, and note that I wasn't saying it was.  Rather the position I was advocating is that CA/CB must include the hips -- it can't be above the hips only.   I.e., hip involvement is necessary but not sufficient.  Further, I'd say the hips are the most important part in CA/CB.  So having the hips involved isn't a refinement, it's primary.

post #161 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post
 

 

Including the hip super charges the CA and CB?


I wouldn't put it that way.  As I mentioned to in my reply to razie, hip involvement isn't something you add to improve CA/CB, it is primary to CA/CB.

post #162 of 178

CORRECTION TO MY ORIGINAL TIP (JUST INFORMED BY THE COACH THAT GAVE IT TO ME :)):

 

The italicized sentence should have read:   And distal freedom requires proximal stability.   [I had accidentally reversed the terms, originally writing:  "And proximal freedom requires distal stability."]

 

Mea culpa! 

post #163 of 178

Best advice for a beginner skier stays with you for life though: "Face the DANGER" (Author: Klaus Mair)

Best advice for taking up skiing ""Skiing is good for your soul" (Author: A Five year old boy said this to his Dad to get him to put on skis)

post #164 of 178

JF Beaulieu telling me to "hold a fart" to engage my core.  

 

He must be right, because my wife tells me to do the same thing.  :duck:

post #165 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernFlicker View Post
 

JF Beaulieu telling me to "hold a fart" to engage my core.  

 

He must be right, because my wife tells me to do the same thing.  :duck:

 

After a mexican feast, we'll refer your technique as "silent but deadly"

When Beaulieu not around, you can use your Gastroenterologist for your ski coach. 

If you are counting on this tip for staying afloat in powder, then loose lips really do sink ships.

Come to think of it, my old coach would tell me to "pucker up" whenever I was feeling unstable.

If your wife puts you on a more healthy diet, you'll need to go somewhere else for your technique.

If you fail to hold and are wearing waterproof/breathable pants, we will all know that your technique is off.

If you fail to hold, and things are more soluble than you thought, it is the waterproof in your pants that the rest of us will appreciate the most.

post #166 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernFlicker View Post
 

JF Beaulieu telling me to "hold a fart" to engage my core.  

 

He must be right, because my wife tells me to do the same thing.  :duck:


Ces Québecois sont tellement cultivés.

post #167 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernFlicker View Post

JF Beaulieu telling me to "hold a fart" to engage my core.  
If you want to find the sweet spot and STAY on thst spot, this is your only hope. You'll make your best turns ever and should feel completely drained at the bottom. Not a quad-burning type of drain, however, more like you had to run a mile to the port-o-poddie while holding it in. Which, leads to functional tension. It better be functional so you can move your legs and arms to make it to the can on time, but you better not lose tension, or else....!
post #168 of 178

Practice your one foot / leg balance (wt forward of course) all year long. That will build the muscle memory to be able to recover from those surprises while employing all those other great techniques 

post #169 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by tachedub View Post
 

Practice your one foot / leg balance (wt forward of course) all year long. That will build the muscle memory to be able to recover from those surprises while employing all those other great techniques 

 

Thumbs Up It is a great way to make long traverses and flats a bit more interesting.

post #170 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post
 

 

Thumbs Up It is a great way to make long traverses and flats a bit more interesting.

Hell,  I don't even like to waste the terrain getting off the lift.  I had the opportunity to observe some training tapes of Mikela S.  from Vail last spring.   She was very focused in that she trained free skiing from the time she got off the lift till she got to the training course and then from the bottom of the training course to the bottom of the hill.  Never a wasted moment, no wasted terrain and  no skiing without focus.  YM

post #171 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 

Hell,  I don't even like to waste the terrain getting off the lift.  I had the opportunity to observe some training tapes of Mikela S.  from Vail last spring.   She was very focused in that she trained free skiing from the time she got off the lift till she got to the training course and then from the bottom of the training course to the bottom of the hill.  Never a wasted moment, no wasted terrain and  no skiing without focus.  YM


There's a parallel to that in swimming, which of course is also a technique-heavy sport.  Terry Laughlin, in his book Total Immersion, observed that, among elite swimmers, a key difference between the very best and those that didn't make the podium was that the former group always kept form, while the latter would keep form during the timed sets, but then let things go during the recovery intervals.

post #172 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 

Hell,  I don't even like to waste the terrain getting off the lift.  I had the opportunity to observe some training tapes of Mikela S.  from Vail last spring.   She was very focused in that she trained free skiing from the time she got off the lift till she got to the training course and then from the bottom of the training course to the bottom of the hill.  Never a wasted moment, no wasted terrain and  no skiing without focus.  YM


There's a parallel to that in swimming, which of course is also a technique-heavy sport.  Terry Laughlin, in his book Total Immersion, observed that, among elite swimmers, a key difference between the very best and those that didn't make the podium was that the former group always kept form, while the latter would keep form during the timed sets, but then let things go during the recovery intervals.


Applies to all sports or activities.

post #173 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 


Applies to all sports or activities.

I read a book years ago about Magic Johnsons' life.  I remember how it spoke of how he used to dribble a basketball to and from school everyday.  I guess if you handle a basket ball enough, it becomes second nature.  YM

post #174 of 178

Muscle memory, trained instinct or any number of other names.  Just make sure its always trained correctly.  Train it wrong it performs wrong when you need it most.

post #175 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 

Muscle memory, trained instinct or any number of other names.  Just make sure its always trained correctly.  Train it wrong it performs wrong when you need it most.

Absolutely, now the question becomes,  who do we trust to be our coach?    YM

post #176 of 178

Part of this is learning to do this for yourself.  When tired or relaxed don't be sloppy as you'll learn those actions.  Coach, instructor, friend, camera or yourself take the one that is concerned when your being sloppy regardless of the of when it occurs.

 

Good example is my sons swim coach.  When our son gets tired (mentally) he gets sloppy and those errors show up very quickly in his races.  The solution, take a break even if it for 30 seconds or five minutes but train correctly, no exceptions.  He is swimming better than ever.

post #177 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnoKarver View Post

Oh, there are many, but when I used to teach... working on stance and balance, keeping the CG over the sweet spot...

"Make love (hips moved forward, over the sweet spot, tall "bone stacked" stance) don't poop on it (squat with hips past rear of the bindings).

Demo helps of course. There is an adult version of this as well, but I'll think of the children. eek.gif

For the Brit clients, I'd translate this to "Squatty is Grotty". No offense to the famous Squatty Schuller, of course. rolleyes.gif  
Damn, you beat me to " ski like you screw, not like you poo"
post #178 of 178
  • In bumps: push/extend your legs down into the troughs...

 

  • General skiing: tip then turn your legs....

 

  • The inside 1/2 is the brains and the outside 1/2 is the brawn..... this can be demoed by lifting the tail of the inside ski and tracing the arc of a turn with it on flat terrain at slow speed... miraculously the outside ski (which has all the weight on it) turns too.

 

  • Start every run straight downhill 

 

 

OK.... so that was 4 things...I'm sure you'll tear me apart now.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching