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Rampage

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

http://www.pinkbike.com/news/video-claudios-course-preview-red-bull-rampage-2015.html

 

This has to be one of the most insane events in cycling. It is being moved up to Friday because of incoming bad weather. I'm not really into the tricks aspect of it, but the terrain is just unbelievable (Literally, I can't believe people can ride this). I will be watching it and hoping that nobody dies.

post #2 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

(Literally, I can't believe people can ride this). I will be watching it and hoping that nobody dies.

+1 I can't even think of watching.... 

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

Finals moved up to 12:30 Eastern today due to threat of inclement weather on Saturday.

 

http://www.redbull.com/uk/en/bike/stories/1331754023802/red-bull-rampage-2015-nicholi-rogatkin-crash

post #4 of 19

Just read about Paul Basagoitia's massive crash and the followup outrage. 

 

 

When Does Risk Outweigh the Reward

 

+++ vibes to Paul++++

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
post #6 of 19

I feel bad for the guy...I understand..but the dude isn't 12.  Same as epic heli-lines in skiing for magazines or movies.  He's an adult and can say, nope, I'm not doing this.  It's not like he was a roadie and decided that extreme mountain biking was a good career choice.  They do it because it's fun and they want to get the biggest air.  Sometimes there's a price.  I mean, it's self-inflicted.

 

Having said that, I wish anyone that's been hurt all the best.  I'm a motorcyclist and have seen many injuries and busted up people, and some fatalities unfortunately.  We make choices..but you never want to see anyone get seriously hurt.

post #7 of 19

PJ had this on at his shop...  We were alternating between grimacing at the crashes and being in awe that anybody could (a) even contemplate riding that and (b) actually pull it off!

 

Absolutely insane event.  I wouldn't hike down some of what they're riding down without a belay harness.

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 

Did you watch the course preview? That is the easiest way down he could possibly find and it was terrifying to watch. It's insane. The other thing that is insane though is that the riders take all the risk and Red Bull gets all the reward.

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

Did you watch the course preview? That is the easiest way down he could possibly find and it was terrifying to watch. It's insane. The other thing that is insane though is that the riders take all the risk and Red Bull gets all the reward.


You can say the same about football.  Chronic brain injuries..short careers..NFL and owners continue to make huge coin.  Flag football?  Dunno..no money in that I suppose.

 

I personally didn't think the preview was all that terrible, except the giant canyon jump.  But I get pretty itchy when I see pros getting 60m of air off the Zielschuss at Kitzbuhel..

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

Did you watch the course preview? That is the easiest way down he could possibly find and it was terrifying to watch. It's insane. The other thing that is insane though is that the riders take all the risk and Red Bull gets all the reward.

 

This?

 

 

The guy's commentary is great.  Sounded like he was ready to poop his pants the whole way down.

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 


You can say the same about football.  Chronic brain injuries..short careers..NFL and owners continue to make huge coin.  Flag football?  Dunno..no money in that I suppose.

 

I personally didn't think the preview was all that terrible, except the giant canyon jump.  But I get pretty itchy when I see pros getting 60m of air off the Zielschuss at Kitzbuhel..


That doesn't seem liek a fair comparison. Many of these guys ended up paying to be there while teh NFL league minimum is $435,000 and the players probably get health insurance too.

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 


That doesn't seem liek a fair comparison. Many of these guys ended up paying to be there while teh NFL league minimum is $435,000 and the players probably get health insurance too.


It was more a comparison of who is getting the pie.  Owners in NFL make more than Red Bull off of this bicycle thing.  And that also brings up the point, why pay to hurt yourself?  I just don't get it. 

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 


It was more a comparison of who is getting the pie.  Owners in NFL make more than Red Bull off of this bicycle thing.  And that also brings up the point, why pay to hurt yourself?  I just don't get it. 


It's a continuum of risk. As a skier I think we all get it to some degree. There are many people that would not accept the level of risk that we (pay to) accept every day that we ski. I would not ride what Paul Bas rides for any amount of money or glory or anything else. He'd do it for free. But he shouldn't have to.

post #14 of 19

When Erik Roner died recently, there was discussion (locally) among some of our friends about how "Red Bull must have some kind of insurance on its high level athletes". 

 

The general consensus was that Red Bull is such a huge company with huge profits that they probably provide some kind of insurance, even if its "self" insurance within the company in case there is a catastrophic accident. 

Keeping in mind that Erik died while sky diving into a charity event and not (necessarily) a Red  Bull performance.  However, from what I understand, any time these athletes perform, even for charity, they are required to don the Red Bull helmet and often sky dive with a Red Bull parachute.

 

Upon further discussion and real knowledge from a few of the Red Bull athletes who live locally, there is no such insurance.  

That is why there is a "go fund me" campaign  Erik Roner - Fallen Hero| Road2Recovery Foundation

 

We can discuss the level of responsibility that someone like Erik or Paul should have when they start having a family, but the sad reality is, there is something inherently wrong with this system if millions are made at the risk of these athletes lives/livelihood while they're scraping the bottom of the barrel and uninsurable. 

post #15 of 19

^ The guys are basically uninsurable so it feels like sponsors should step up and operate a self insurance fund for life changing accidents or family support.  Question is how much is it fair for them to support?  I'm not sure how much Red Bull and the others make out of the sports programmes and how you'd ever quantify it to determine the contribution of individual athletes - I've often heard them described as a sports marketing business with a soft drink on the side.  Certainly a lot goes into pro sports teams and the events themselves.  

 

I'm always surprised when there are crowdfunding events put around the deaths of people who are at the top of their field.  Sure the company that has kicked in a few pairs of skis for them shouldn't be on the hook for lifetime support of the family but it feels morally there is some sort of obligation.  I guess the corporate lawyers view it as a watertight situation of we are generous enough to support these people in their activities (& ask for a quid pro quo in terms of logo placement) but not that the individuals are ever employees.  

 

Think F1. No-one would seriously be expecting the sponsors to be liable for a driver's injuries, often they've been really doing the driver a favour by bringing in a big enough package for a "pay to play" seat..

post #16 of 19
post #17 of 19

Another thought: (playing devils advocate) 

 

Where would these athletes be if RedBull didn't provide the platform for them to do what they love to do? 

 

Is RedBull providing them the fame so that they can go out and make $$ elsewhere with other advertising revenue streams, or does RedBull require them to stay attached to them? 

 

In the link I posted a few days ago there is a section on the "build crews" which are (mostly) unpaid friends of the riders. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Just read about Paul Basagoitia's massive crash and the followup outrage. 

 

 

When Does Risk Outweigh the Reward

 

+++ vibes to Paul++++

 

In the link I posted a few days ago there is a section on the "build crews" which are (mostly) unpaid friends of the riders. 

This makes me wonder about the liability involved?  Are these "build crews" putting their butts on the line?  

Perhaps its not RedBull's liability since they didn't actually build the feature? 

 

*This is just another train of thought and not necessarily what's in my heart and mind. 

 

 

 

Quote from article: 

Quote:
 

To add, the event has gotten to the point where every rider has to build some incredible and unique features to do well. You can't just ride down the mountain anymore. That's not nearly rowdy enough for the cameras. As a rider you have to bring a big build crew, which in turn means persuading your buddies to join your dig team.

Sounds like a dream, right? Building rad lines at Rampage? Think again. Shear exposure, smoldering temperatures, a risk of dehydration, sore muscles, blisters, snakes, and scorpions aside, these buddies will need to work 12 hours a day for six plus days in a row for nothing - because the vast majority of the riders can't afford to pay them. The diggers do it out of passion and love for their rider buddy whose "big day at Rampage" has finally come. The diggers are an often forgotten but major component of every rider's performance. "Privilege" only goes so far, and unfortunately lodging, food, and transportation don't pay for themselves. The riders do their best to make it happen for their build crews, but it's high time Red Bull properly acknowledges this crucial component.

post #18 of 19

Respect for all riders doing RAMPAGE!!!

post #19 of 19

RIP Kelly McGarry

 

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