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Boot flex and directing pressure forward - Page 13

post #361 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
 

 

 

 

 Like a freestyle aerialist doing a back flip, it doesn't matter what "position" he gets himself into in the air, as long as he lands in balance.

 

 

 

 

Best regards,

Bob

I certainly reject this idea.   As a former competitive water ski jumper, I report that the less balanced you are in the air, the less likely you are to land in balance, successfully complete the jump at all (CRASH) or at the very least, spend your flight time trying to regain your balance so that when you do land you have a chance of completing the jump.   At least for me,  I know that if I left the ramp out of balance, I was consumed in the air with recovery in order to land the jump and not get trashed in the process.   YM 

post #362 of 363

I'm not sure there's any disagreement there, Yogaman. "Balance," a function of the relationship between the center of mass and the base of support, is pretty much a meaningless concept in the air (where there is no BoS)--as the variety of different positions in which you can find an aerialist or freestyler while airborne proves--but that's not to say that the attitude, movements, timing, and so on are not critical. The entire measure of whether you're doing it right, though (other than style points in the air), is in the landing. So as I described before, any "balancing" movements we make while in the air matter later--in the landing. That's Balance in the Fourth Dimension--movements now to create balance later. And that's essentially what I read you describing as well. 

 

Just for fun, I've often asked freestyle skiers and snowboarders whether they think they can be "out of balance" in the air. Some laugh and say "of course not." Others say absolutely yes. But when I ask them how they know they're out of balance, they invariably answer "you'll know when you land." Which, again, is my point. The movements you make when unweighted or airborne matter, but their effects don't matter until later, when you land. Who really cares what "position" you're in while you're airborne, as long as you land smoothly and in balance. 

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #363 of 363
It's really bad when you know before you catch air that youre so out of balance that no anticipatory moves will save you. There are certainly different levels of balance, not just in or out (in is obviously top on The meter of course). The definition of being off-balance includes being out out of porportion; not standing, sitting or resting while being out of equilibrium; surprise; and upset due to a state of confusion. Our brains seem to have a meter for when equilibrum will not be found. Crash. BUT, we have an even better meter for anticipating equilibrium, hopefully. The sweet spot is a spot, but it isnt. Meaning, it is physically built into the ski as Bob described earlier, but as he also mentioned it could care less about you or its position in space. That's your job!

Lastly, the sign of a good coach is someone that can agree with you and at the same time explain that you are wrong. wink.gif

"You can't get hurt in the air". One of my favorite t-shirts ever.
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