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Yet another help pick ski thread. [2nd season, in PA] - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by prologix View Post
 

 

Edit: Sorry I forgot to mention I am an engineer, and as such believe outcomes can be predicted if only I have the right information.

 

Beyond the 'suggested' settings, it comes down to which outcome you would prefer - release or retention?  

 That is all the 1-/1/2/3/3+ progression really is, an approximate indicator of the skier's outcome preference. 

 

(the numeric values in the binding windows are also approximate indicators but that's a matter for a different thread).
 

post #32 of 41

it is also depends on the binding (I think it is).

Basically, if binding has a greater lateral release, you could go with lower DIN (like -0.5 to -1.0).

but that is probably not an option since OP has a demo binding and demo have very small lateral release (am I correct?)

post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg S View Post
 

it is also depends on the binding (I think it is).

Basically, if binding has a greater lateral release, you could go with lower DIN (like -0.5 to -1.0).

 

I think you are referring to what some people do with bindings that have a high "elasticity" ( bindings that allow large deflections without triggering a release event). 

post #34 of 41

I would argue that when you're still skiing relatively tame terrain, as @prologix is, the lower DIN setting associated with skier type 1 or 2 makes sense. You're not skiing anything where losing a ski is in itself a dangerous proposition. Torquing your knee is the biggest risk. As one progresses, one starts getting into terrain where losing a ski introduces a certain amount of physical danger. That's why newbies are typically given skier type 1, and more advanced skiers typically end up at 3. 

 

It may be helpful, or not, to point out that there's a formula, but a lot of experienced skiers (not me) set their own DINs and have preferences that don't align with the formula. You'll hear people talking about DINs of 10 or more - typically for people doing big jumps.

 

A few years ago, I was skiing some mank and found my ski starting to torque my leg. I quickly went from "Crap, I'm going to lose my ski!" to "Crap, my ski isn't coming off!" The binding did eventually release, and my knee was slightly tweaked - it bothered me a little bit all summer - but not badly damaged. If you're not skiing steeps, I don't see why you wouldn't want the binding set so that the ski comes the F off in that situation. 

post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by prologix View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

mark yourself as III 


Type 3 = din 8

 

Is this a work up to thing like I start say at 6, then 6.5 and so on to 8 or just have the shop set to 8 and pray.

 

Edit: Sorry I forgot to mention I am an engineer, and as such believe outcomes can be predicted if only I have the right information.

Remember YOU have to sign of on the paperwork. Type III is for a person that wants retention over release and skis at a high speed. You will be mostly on blues and greensand slower to moderate speed and do not have that much experience under your belt. Bindings are not the smartest creatures and know only the force that is put into them. That is additional information that will help you decide what to tell the person behind the desk who will either be setting your bindings or passing them to the tech that will. 

post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Remember YOU have to sign of on the paperwork. Type III is for a person that wants retention over release and skis at a high speed. You will be mostly on blues and greensand slower to moderate speed and do not have that much experience under your belt. Bindings are not the smartest creatures and know only the force that is put into them. That is additional information that will help you decide what to tell the person behind the desk who will either be setting your bindings or passing them to the tech that will. 

One thing to keep in mind - it is always easier to increase DIN because your ski is releasingtoo much than to rehab a torn ACL.

Don't be talked into thinking that a higher DIN means you are a better skier. You can ski aggressively with a "low" DIN if you have good technique.

Keep the DIN at recommended levels to start (5 or 6 sounds reasonable based on the DIN chart). If it releases when you would have preferred it to stay on, go to the lodge and increase the DIN half a level. Repeat until it only releases when you want it to release.

Especially at beginner and low intermediate levels on PA greens and blues, ski release is very important to prevent tweaking your leg.
post #37 of 41

".... You can ski aggressively with a "low" DIN if you have good technique..."

 

that was my point... with good binding elasticity, you could set a lower DIN and get away without pre-releases. So, in your case, you would probably could use din 5-6 even you think that your weight should dictate higher DIN. But again... please contact your shop/binding tech for final DIN settings.

post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by prologix View Post
 

Per www.dinsetting.com : Skier weight 210+, Height 5’11”-6"4", Age 10-49, Skier type:1 or 2, boot sole length: More than 331, Salomon Binding
Skier type 1 = Din 5.5
Skier type 2 = Din 6.5

 

Now how do I compensate for the formula being only for the little people near 210lbs?

That's not how it works. 

 

The Height/ Weight/ Age is used to predict bone density. Being too heavy for your height doesn't mean your bones are more dense. (I hope that doesn't sound mean, it's just how it works)

post #39 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
The Height/ Weight/ Age is used to predict bone density. Being too heavy for your height doesn't mean your bones are more dense. (I hope that doesn't sound mean, it's just how it works)

Thanks, that makes sense.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg S View Post
 

".... You can ski aggressively with a "low" DIN if you have good technique..."

 

that was my point... with good binding elasticity, you could set a lower DIN and get away without pre-releases. So, in your case, you would probably could use din 5-6 even you think that your weight should dictate higher DIN. But again... please contact your shop/binding tech for final DIN settings.

Bringing the skis in to the shop and discussing DIN, promise.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thefortrees View Post

Don't be talked into thinking that a higher DIN means you are a better skier. You can ski aggressively with a "low" DIN if you have good technique.tweaking your leg.

Developing good technique and not tweaking my leg are both goals of mine.

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

I would argue that when you're still skiing relatively tame terrain, as @prologix is, the lower DIN setting associated with skier type 1 or 2 makes sense. You're not skiing anything where losing a ski is in itself a dangerous proposition. Torquing your knee is the biggest risk. As one progresses, one starts getting into terrain where losing a ski introduces a certain amount of physical danger.

 

This ^^

 

For now, err on the side of easy release.  As you get better, you can dial up your DIN incrementally. 

 

I've been on both sides of this issue.  I once chattered out of a binding on a GS course and could have easily shot into the trees if the timing had been just a shade different.  Next year, I over-compensated my DIN setting (from 10 to 14), caught an edge, and tore the sh-- out of my ACL.  Bindings never released, despite loads of torque and some head-over-heels tumbling.  I'm back to 10 or 11 now.

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 


Congrats!  Just take it easy the first day or two.  I think you should be fine given that you are willing to invest in lessons.

 

In case you haven't seen it before, here are some basic balance exercises that I do all the time.  I do the static version when I'm waiting around for a few minutes whatever reason.  Building up control little by little takes consistency, but not a lot of physical effort.  I learned a few years about how I could help my skiing by having better balance while rehabbing from a knee injury (not skiing).

 

 

Thanks for that!

One other balance exercise I have found helpful came from my Physical Therapist while rehabbing from a hip muscle injury:

... Simply stand on one leg on a bozu ball...

....... Sounds easy.  It ain't (at least not for me).  But it triggers a lot of muscles from the hips to the toes.  You can feel them firing...

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Yet another help pick ski thread. [2nd season, in PA]