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Considering a massive vechicle change

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I currently own a 2013 Ford F150 Super Crew 6.5 Bed with an off road package (locking diff). Its been the best winter vehicle I've ever owned extremely damp, heavy goes through anything, lots of storage for skis and equipment. 

 

A month ago I purchased a much nicer home and the sale of my home fell through which led to a large price reduction so I didn't have to carry both. 

 

Long story short I'm considering unloading my truck, purchasing a coworkers 2011 Volt which would result in 0 car payment and Id be able to roll to work virtually free (work has free charging stations). My only real concern is this winter (Connecticut), I drive my daughter to ski lessons each weekend in state. My town is by the shore but is very hilly. Can I get by with 2wd???

post #2 of 15

With 4 good snow tires and good driving habits, absolutely. For an extra level of security, carry chains in the car. Hopefully you will get enough snow to need them. 

post #3 of 15

Can I get by with 2wd???

 

Lots of folks do.  If you want some insurance, get a set of 4 Michelin X ice or equivalent snow tires. They do make a huge difference in traction and stopping on ice and snow.

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

Yeah I've been spoiled with 4wd... I'll definitely consider snow tires. 

post #5 of 15

While I now have an AWD vehicle, I've used snows on a FWD car for a long time and the only time I ever had a problem was when I high centered the thing on an unplowed road (stupid me!).  Otherwise, it works great.  I remember that right after I bought my last set of snows I got to the ski area for the first time and tried braking hard on sheet ice in the parking lot.  The thing stopped dead in a straight line (no ABS on that car).  I was happy and impressed.

post #6 of 15

Do you get that much snow in Connecticut? 

 

I grew up in NJ and we'd get maybe one or two storms a year - and half the time, they'd declare state of emergency and you'd have a very good reason to go nowhere. 

post #7 of 15

I live in the NW hills of CT.  Lots of snow, slush, ice, variable conditions that CT can produce.  Have had a AWD car for the past 25 years, but I've also owned 2WD for most of that time.  Now I've given up 4WD or AWD completely.  Most recently, I bought a VW Sportswagen FWD car and fitted it with 4 true snow tires that I put on and off for the season.  No problems at all for the last two winters.  Most (not all, but most) of the problems in bad conditions can be traced to bad driving.  Easy on the gas, easy on the brakes, leave lots of room b/w and around other vehicles.  

 

Some 2WD cars are more problematic than others; my old Honda Civic just didn't have enough weight to plow deep stuff. But get a reasonable car, fit it with 4 dedicated snows, and you'll be fine 90% of the time.  

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

I live in the NW hills of CT.  Lots of snow, slush, ice, variable conditions that CT can produce.  Have had a AWD car for the past 25 years, but I've also owned 2WD for most of that time.  Now I've given up 4WD or AWD completely.  Most recently, I bought a VW Sportswagen FWD car and fitted it with 4 true snow tires that I put on and off for the season.  No problems at all for the last two winters.  Most (not all, but most) of the problems in bad conditions can be traced to bad driving.  Easy on the gas, easy on the brakes, leave lots of room b/w and around other vehicles.  

 

Some 2WD cars are more problematic than others; my old Honda Civic just didn't have enough weight to plow deep stuff. But get a reasonable car, fit it with 4 dedicated snows, and you'll be fine 90% of the time.  

Well I'll be coming through your way every weekend to Sundown. Thanks for the reply. 

 

JoeUT, last year we got 65 inches at BDL and normally average around 40 inches.

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdrew9 View Post
 

Well I'll be coming through your way every weekend to Sundown. Thanks for the reply. 

 

The other consideration is that most roads (Rte 8 + Rte 44) to Sundown are considered major arteries and kept up reasonably well. Your biggest issues -- if you have any -- will be the curve right before Sundown on Ratlum Road and escaping the parking lot if it snows a lot during the day.  

 

Best of luck; as I said, I have been completely satisfied trading 4WD for mileage gains.  

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 

Should I be considering a studded tire or just a regular snow tire?

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdrew9 View Post
 

Should I be considering a studded tire or just a regular snow tire?


Regular snow tires.  (Live in CT, avid skier, driven to ski resorts during the worst storms of the last three years).

 

For reference - I managed to get up an un-plowed Vermont access road with about 4-6 inches of fresh over a packed snow base in my 2WD car using high quality snow tires (that were about 4/5ths through their lifespan) this past winter. Ski sundown's a cakewalk in comparison - you'll be fine with real snows, and if you carry chains+shovel+gravel you'll be good for anything that'll hit CT.

post #12 of 15

Put some X-ice IIIs on it and you will not have any problems until the snow is a couple of inches higher than the floor pan.  Then you will get hung up as the car won't have the weight to plow through it.  It doesn't have the ground clearance your truck has.  It also doesn't have the momentum, so you will need more speed to get through deep drifts.   Also there will be some control issues on deep snow as the lighter car will tend to ride on the snow instead of cutting through it.  It's kind of like walking on a squishy mat instead of a hard floor.  I went through a similar, but not quite as bad transition going from a full-sized Caprice Wagon to a tiny Pontiac Wave G3.

post #13 of 15

2011, huh?    Don't forget to read up on Engine Assisted Heating and how to set that threshold.

post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

2011, huh?    Don't forget to read up on Engine Assisted Heating and how to set that threshold.

Yes 2011, bad move? I don't know much about hybrid/electric vehicles but the financials certainly make sense. 

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdrew9 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

2011, huh?    Don't forget to read up on Engine Assisted Heating and how to set that threshold.

Yes 2011, bad move? I don't know much about hybrid/electric vehicles but the financials certainly make sense. 

 

Not 'bad move', just different from what you're used to - heating the cabin in cold weather is a major battery suck so there's all sorts of workarounds like preheating while still charging (not going to happen in a ski area lot), using the seat heat instead of cabin heat (annoying when glass fogs) , and forcing the engine to fire up to heat the cabin.       That last sounds worse than it is; you actually want the gas engine to fire up just so the fuel doesn't go bad from sitting in the tank too long.

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