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Does your insulation (or mid-layer) impede your shell’s breathability? - Page 2

post #31 of 38

 

I've been skiing, climbing (rock and ice), bacpacking for about 50 years. I've gone from wool, cotton mesh and wool-cotton blend baselayers,  army surplus, 60/40 cloth shells, nonbreathable rain gear, and down (see my avatar for an example) to goretex, fleece--including the first generation brown stuff that still sits in my car when I drive I80 in bad weather--wicking base layers, synthetic puffies. I've spent a day and a night on Mt Washington, where the picture was taken, -10F high, -30F low with winds 100-140mph in the old stuff, -40F temp at Alta, -40 windchill on the Aiguille du Midi, and plenty of spring skiing in California. I can't honestly say that I am any more comfortable now than I was back in the day. Do strenuous activity outdoors in tough weather conditions and you will be uncomfortable from time to time no matter what you are doing, and managing your comfort will depend more on your behavior than on your gear. With resort skiing i figure I'm doing it right if I'm cold on the lift and hot on the run. Best gear advise I can think of--in checking a jacket see how easy it is to operate the zippers and flaps with gloves on. The point of this rant--don't overthink it and don't overspend, especially for resort skiing where comfort and survival are waiting at the lodge.

post #32 of 38

Interesting topic.

 

I find the most important thing in any jacket is that it has pit zips.  Gotta' be able to dump that excess heat.

 

I am amazed when I see high end technical jackets ($200+) that don't have this simple feature. I refuse to buy any outerwear made for physical activity that does not have them.

post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I can't honestly say that I am any more comfortable now than I was back in the day. Do strenuous activity outdoors in tough weather conditions and you will be uncomfortable from time to time no matter what you are doing, and managing your comfort will depend more on your behavior than on your gear. With resort skiing i figure I'm doing it right if I'm cold on the lift and hot on the run. Best gear advise I can think of--in checking a jacket see how easy it is to operate the zippers and flaps with gloves on. The point of this rant--don't overthink it and don't overspend, especially for resort skiing where comfort and survival are waiting at the lodge.

 

True, but you don't want to have to waste time in the lodge warming up if you didn't dress appropriately. It's super frustrating to be under-dressed on a spectacular power day when it's frigid and stormy.

 

So another thumb for me...overdress a bit, but make sure you have the ability to ventilate. You can cool off pretty easily if you're a bit too warm, but if you're cold and miserable and don't have more layers, giving up ski time to warm up in the lodge is the only option.

 

Agree on the zipper point!

post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThrillHill View Post
 

On a related breathability tangent, do any of you guys own/use the Patagonia Nano Air? Finally tried one on last night at my local REI...ohhhhh...it felt so nice. Every article and review I read gives a glowing report. And I like my shiny new gear as much as the next guy, but I have difficulty believing the water vapor transport is better than my trusty Eddie Bauer fleece pullover, or better thermal retention properties under a shell.

 

I definitely lusted after the jacket, but the MSRP of $249.00 seems to offer extreme diminishing returns in regards to it's use as a mid-layer as opposed to a good fleece. But if the breathability performance of the Nano Air is that much more superior, I'm all ears!

 

I have a Patagonia nano air jacket that has become my absolute favorite jacket, although I haven't used it skiing much (yet). I like it for its light weight, softness, stretch, and very wide temperature range. As far as breathability goes, I have yet to feel clammy in it.

 

I recently purchased an Outdoor Research Uberlayer hoodie made of Polartech Alpha and I prefer the Nano Air.

post #35 of 38

I'm a big fan of Arcteryx core loft for my mid layer.  I have both the Atom LT and the Atom AR that I wear under a Goretex pro shell.  The last couple years, I was living in Edmonton and I skied at Marmot Basin where the temps regularly hit -30C.  I would wear an Icebreaker 260 merino wool sweater, the Atom AR jacket and a Beta AR shell jacket.  I never had a problem keeping my core warm.

post #36 of 38

The next question should be - does your pack impede your shell's and your midlayer's breathability?

post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

The next question should be - does your pack impede your shell's and your midlayer's breathability?
Only everywhere it touches my body...
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post


Only everywhere it touches my body...

Well then you just need to layer it efficiently  :duck:

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