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What makes a ski "Classic" - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

The 207cm was a common length for SL. Atomic,Elan,Head,Rossi and Hart.
I liked the 210cm GS skis.

 

I seem to remember having 207cm Fischers also. 

post #32 of 46
No doubt. Most skis ran - 190,195,200,203,205,207,210,ect. Did buy a pair of Head Deep Powder 213cm from thrift store. But the 223cm were the ski of choice for powder.
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

No doubt. Most skis ran - 190,195,200,203,205,207,210,ect. Did buy a pair of Head Deep Powder 213cm from thrift store. But the 223cm were the ski of choice for powder.

What's incredible is that systematically across the ski industry that the solution to powder and off piste skiing was seen to be make it longer rather than considering that there were other variables that could be played with like width and shape.

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 

What's incredible is that systematically across the ski industry that the solution to powder and off piste skiing was seen to be make it longer rather than considering that there were other variables that could be played with like width and shape.

 

It wasn't until snowboards came along that it dawned on ski manufacturers that width and shape could have a bearing on ski performance. Without snowboarding, we might all still be on 210 straight skis. 

post #35 of 46
post #36 of 46

Oh - I agree on the snowboarding part.  Which is why I don't have much respect for the idea of really progressive thinking within the big ski cos

post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 

Oh - I agree on the snowboarding part.  Which is why I don't have much respect for the idea of really progressive thinking within the big ski cos

 

So long as that qualifier is clear, I'll not argue.     There were plays with width and shape long long long before the Spatula.    Just no traction in the market.

post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

So long as that qualifier is clear, I'll not argue.     There were plays with width and shape long long long before the Spatula.    Just no traction in the market.

I think the Explosiv or Powder Plus/K2 Four/SCX cut off is a reasonable one.  Before then people were playing but no one was putting serious effort into selling it to customers and/or convincing a reactionary technical skiing constituency.  

 

If I look at history I guess I see the real turning points being Bode racing on the Four and the entry into the ski market of Salomon who were prepared to try lots of relatively wacky ideas (or at least mass market ideas that were out there) and throw plenty of marketing muscle behind it.

 

Between the X Scream, 1080, Pocket and AK Rocket they did a lot to really create some mass market ski categories IMV.  One might argue that K2 were at about the same place at the same time in the US with the Mod X - Lawnchair range

post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

So long as that qualifier is clear, I'll not argue.     There were plays with width and shape long long long before the Spatula.    Just no traction in the market.

I think the Explosiv or Powder Plus/K2 Four/SCX cut off is a reasonable one.  Before then people were playing but no one was putting serious effort into selling it to customers and/or convincing a reactionary technical skiing constituency.  

 

 

I'm troubled by this statement in two ways -

1) It seems to be arguing from the conclusion.   We have no way to judge other than by market effects, and we are compelled into dismissing such things as Miller powder designs and Japanese reverse sidecut designs and 1970's 70mmish waists and turned up tails by what, today, are major companies,  as 'not serious effort'. 

2) I see the inertia continuing past the cut off.    Witness how slowly 75mm++ waisted short-turn carvers were adopted - it was a case of Atomic and sevenish dwarf companies who put their heart and soul into their design (Snowrider, Phantom, Odyssey ...) 

post #40 of 46

Probably not a true classic because it never gained popularity but Fischer came out with a wide ski with conventional sidecut in the mid 1970s: Fischer Fats, possibly the first fat ski.

post #41 of 46

Honorable mention at the very least for the US Army's "White Elephants". That was the ski of the 10th Mountain Division and used by them with up-dates right through the 70's. Suspect it was the first ski of many skiers in the 40's-early 60's. Not a good ski but it has a classic place in the history of US skiing.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

Probably not a true classic because it never gained popularity but Fischer came out with a wide ski with conventional sidecut in the mid 1970s: Fischer Fats, possibly the first fat ski.

There were several others from this vintage that tried to change the game with shorter lengths flexes and side-cuts. Miller Soft, shorter lengths wider and softer flex. Head Shorts; short wide Head Standard. Dynamic VR27?; lots of World Cup coaches were roaring around on it about 72 especially the French. These folks and no doubt others tried to change the game but it just was not time yet. 

 

There has never been a shortage of people asking, "what if?" in this sport.

post #42 of 46
Hi stranger. We called them The White Rockets & Mickey Mouse boots.
Edited by slider - 10/12/15 at 1:43pm
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

Probably not a true classic because it never gained popularity but Fischer came out with a wide ski with conventional sidecut in the mid 1970s: Fischer Fats, possibly the first fat ski.

do you have pics? links?  exact year(s) I would love some more info about these.  thanks.

post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by royal View Post
 

do you have pics? links?  exact year(s) I would love some more info about these.  thanks.

 

Nope. I was a lifty in '75 and remember seeing them and I remember the name Fischer Fats.

post #45 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

No love for Hexcels.


Slider

 

Hexcel Comp is on my list.  In the original navy blue and lime green.  Light and strong as good as any.

post #46 of 46

Since I own a pair, I nominate the hart ballet.

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