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MA Jon Olsson freesking GS 2011

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone! Have been reading EpicSki Forums last year. Time to start posting. :)  I'm a 47 year old skier who raced in my youth. Had 80-100 ski days every year from 5 yo to 20 yo. Then I stopped skiing until I was 44 and now I'm back at it. Superfun! Tryin to find my way back too good skiing and beginning thinkin about masters racing (GS) just for fun.

 

But the MA I'm requesting is not my own skiing. Found this nice video on VIMEO of Jon Olsson freeskiing GS postseason 2010/2011. Guess he is on old r>27 m GS-skis here. Jon won the Nor-Am GS title 2009/2010 I think. 2011 he had started racing Europa Cup. His FIS-points at the time of the video is somewhere around 12-15 I think.

Just want to hear what u guys have to say about his skiing in this video. Whats good? Whats could be better?...and so on. 

 

Link:  https://vimeo.com/26336405

 

 

Mod note: embedded video

post #2 of 22

Hi Vikingskier,

 

Looks to me like some kind of stacking drill, beautifully done but probably not typical freeskiing.  I only watched this once through but it is worth going back to for sure, thanks for posting!

 

 

Great things we can watch & take away from this:

 

 

near perfect balance fore & aft... notice how still & relaxed he leaves his upper body.

near perfect balance laterally...  watch how parallel his legs are & how he maintains equal edge angles throughout & pressure to the outside ski.

 

his transition between turns is patient & relaxed...  he never lets the skis get away from him, occasionally he needs to make a pullback move to stay with it but he never seems to over-do it.  This also allows him to get high edge angles BEFORE the pressure happens.

 

the power/carving phase of the turn is also patient & allowed to develop...  see his inside leg get progressively shorter as he gets deeper into the arc.  his counter & angulation smoothly blend as the forces build.

 

 

Towards the end he seems to beginn moving a little more dynamically, but until he starts involving some pole action he is limited in how much he can move his mass aggressively into the new turn

 

It is also interesting to note that he seems to use an extension type transition exclusively in this video.  Considering that I am pretty sure he was getting some coaching from an advocate of a different movement pattern during this period, I am a bit surprised.  To me, this merely shows that there is more than one way to skin a cat ;).

 

Thanks,

JF


Edited by 4ster - 10/8/15 at 6:55am
post #3 of 22

Appears that he is doing a drill in that clip. Here he is in a course on 35m skis.

 

 

 

and here in a Lambo

 

post #4 of 22
Quote:

Originally Posted by VikingSkier View Post
....

Link:  https://vimeo.com/26336405

 

 

Mod note: embedded video

 

He doesn't use a pole plant in order to intentionally isolate the effect of outside shoulder lift.

Watch from 53sec onward.  He's got his poles in hand but does not use them.

 

With each initiation he does a three part thing with his new (soon-to-be) outside half.  

--He lifts his new outside shoulder.  

--He lifts its elbow and he moves it somewhat backwards, slightly shifting the shoulder backwards along with it.

--He extends the leg below them while that ski is still on its little toe edge. 

I think this video is meant to focus on capturing the effects of that movement pattern.

post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

--He extends the leg below them while that ski is still on its little toe edge. 

Yes, I would agree this is probably his main focus for most of these runs.
The fact that he doesn't involve his arms & poles is probably to allow him to isolate his early weight shift & leg extension to the new turn.
Watch how involved his arm & pole action become in the gates video.
post #6 of 22

Or is he working on holding counter and angulation through the transition?

post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post
....Here he is in a course on 35m skis.

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
--He extends the leg below them while that ski is still on its little toe edge. 
Yes, I would agree this is probably his main focus for most of these runs.
The fact that he doesn't involve his arms & poles is probably to allow him to isolate his early weight shift & leg extension to the new turn.
Watch how involved his arm & pole action become in the gates video.


There's a LOT of arm movement as he moves through those gates.  Anyone find that odd?

post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 


There's a LOT of arm movement as he moves through those gates.  Anyone find that odd?

 

No.

 

post #9 of 22

What I see is down pressure over his centrifugal buildup under a wide and stable arm and shoulder carriage. From what I may understand, with coordinated timing, the result of opposing vectors blasts energy to the ski which, in turn, transmits shiny and colorful nerve impulses to the brain's pleasure center.

post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post
 

 

No.

 

They are both not just dropping but swinging back the inside arm as they pass the gate and am guessing that it is either to create upper body rotational inertia for the new turn or to nullify upper body counter rotational inertia from the old turn, or both. Most WC racers have the upper body discipline to be able to throw arms like that while maintaining the precision balance that is required by everything else. Either it is that or that they both just got out of the same dance class and are still enjoying the moment.

 

Arms present as useful cantilevers in other situations such as a forward reach and lift for getting a touch more forward or raising the outside arm to initiate inclination. This type of arm movement is also useful for saying hello to a friend on your way down a championship course. 

post #11 of 22

Ever ski GS? You get that inside arm out of the effing way or you break sh!t - sometimes to a detriment of the turn, but it beats a broken hand... these guys are better at it than 'normal' people.

post #12 of 22
Even with protection, clipping a pole hurts like a heluvaskier.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Even with protection, clipping a pole hurts like a heluvaskier.

 

Is that a selfie?

post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post

Is that a selfie?

No. I don't see a selfie stick.

"Can't live and hold a camera, someone has to tape this"
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post


No. I don't see a selfie stick.
 

 

One of those  "Follow Me" drones could do it.

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post

One of those  "Follow Me" drones could do it.

Seems this was filmed prior to the invention of drones... Possibly digital cameras.
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post


Seems this was filmed prior to the invention of drones... Possibly digital cameras.

 

I'm betting Slider still looks like that!

post #18 of 22
Master of the yardsale.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Master of the yardsale.

But, you weren't wearing goggles. biggrin.gif

Edit: tricky.... Well played
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post

 

One of those  "Follow Me" drones could do it.


I'd prefer the "Follow Him" model.  

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post
 

 

One of those  "Follow Me" drones could do it.

 

This thing looks awesome, but the maximum follow speed is 25mph. That's a bit slow for shadowing race turns, plus it doesn't avoid objects while following. On the right trail it would still work very well though I'd imagine. 

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

Ever ski GS? You get that inside arm out of the effing way or you break sh!t - sometimes to a detriment of the turn, but it beats a broken hand... these guys are better at it than 'normal' people.

Yes, and with a bamboo initiation. Protection is a good point however, still, the arm movement certainly punctuates his upper body technique and I swear that it can be observed that it perpetuates a residual effect. That of which would throw most of us off where we want to be. On anyone other than a wc racer, it would just look undisciplined.
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