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Skis for a Clydesdale

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

I am new to skiing and this forum. I am very new to skiing but would like to start this year. I did ski once at Bear Valley in the early 1980's when I had less rings on my trunk (tall and skinny) but only had rentals to use. I am 6'5 and 300 pounds. I am a definite beginner. I won't be doping anything crazy but would like to ski some more advanced runs at some point going low and slow like the old fogey I am. I also have size 16 shoes so I don't know if boot sizes are the same as shoe sizes. I appreciate any help you guys can give me. 

post #2 of 20

1  Find a recommendation for a bootfitter near to you and get some boots properly fitted for you - that will cost but is the best money you'll spend.

 

2 Skis - standard rental fodder may be a bit too floppy for you so talk to the bootfitter who has assessed you about what skis you should be looking to rent.  Remember standard advice won't apply as a ski that is wider/longer/stiffer than the norm for a beginner may well behave the same for you.

 

3 Lessons Lessons Lessons

post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

I am new to skiing and this forum. I am very new to skiing but would like to start this year. I did ski once at Bear Valley in the early 1980's when I had less rings on my trunk (tall and skinny) but only had rentals to use. I am 6'5 and 300 pounds. I am a definite beginner. I won't be doping anything crazy but would like to ski some more advanced runs at some point going low and slow like the old fogey I am. I also have size 16 shoes so I don't know if boot sizes are the same as shoe sizes. I appreciate any help you guys can give me. 


Welcome to EpicSki!  What region are you planning to ski in?  Any good ski shops near you?

 

I have a good friend who is not quite your size but has big feet.  Based on his experience, renting boots and skis is probably not going to work.  The first time he tried renting as an adult (30 years ago), even after the resort rental guys found boots that more or less fit, they didn't have any bindings set up to handle boots that long.  It was a small place in the southeast, but may be the case elsewhere.

 

Paging @XLTL 

post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 

I live just down the hill from Big Bear in southern California. We have some good ski shops within an hour or so. But with California not even thinking that we will be getting snow because of the drought no one is stocking much yet. I will definitely be taking lots of lessons or upping my insurance plan. :). I think getting a custom fit is the best route even though more expensive than off the rack. 

post #5 of 20

Boots will be a problem.  Post a question about your size, and the fact that you're a beginner, on the Ask The Boot Guys sub-forum.  Boots are the most important piece of equipment, they need to fit just right, they need the right flex for the skier's size, ability, and skiing style, and you don't want boots that don't work right for you.

 

For skis, you might need to rent higher cost demo skis or buy used skis.  Find some used ones that might fill the bill and ask here first.  You need skis with enough backbone in them to handle your height (leverage) and weight, but not too much so they end up taking you for a ride.

post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

 I also have size 16 shoes so I don't know if boot sizes are the same as shoe sizes. 

 

It has yet to be clearly stated in this thread: they are not, and you should not expect correspondence, and you should not expect them to fit like shoes. 

post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

I live just down the hill from Big Bear in southern California. We have some good ski shops within an hour or so. But with California not even thinking that we will be getting snow because of the drought no one is stocking much yet. I will definitely be taking lots of lessons or upping my insurance plan. :). I think getting a custom fit is the best route even though more expensive than off the rack. 


A bit of an aside, but you might introduce yourself in the newly created meetup thread for Big Bear.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/142952/big-bear-2015-2016

 

There is also an active thread for Mammoth if you think you might get there for a few days.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/142494/mammoth-mountain-for-2015-2016

 

The concept of a "boot fitter" takes a while to understand.  It's rare even for folks with average size feet to be able to simply buy ski boots "off the rack" that they end up really happy with.  The number of variables in terms of low volume, high volume, low arch, high arch, skinny legs, big calves, are overwhelming.  A good boot fitter considers several factors besides the length and width of feet before pulling out a few models for someone to try.  What's really different is what happens after the customer uses the boots a few times.  Properly fitted boots can be tweaked in a variety of ways for no charge.  Usually for at least a year, if not for the lifetime of the boots.

 

Have you stopped in a ski shop yet?  A good shop usually has boots from previous years.  For a first pair of boots, "new old stock" can be the way to go.  Although for your size that's less likely to be an option.

post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the information. I will go to the Big Bear/Mammoth threads tonight. I haven't been to a ski shop as it seems that I have a choice between REI, other sporting goods shops, and maybe one private out fitter. Not too much in the land of the drought and sun I guess. Many of the stores I called strictly do snow boarding so not much help there. I might have to take a weekend off and head up to Utah to see my uncle and hit a shop. Finding boots might be a lot like Inspector Clouseau looking for the Pink Panther. I appreciate all the responses. 

post #9 of 20

Where in Utah is your uncle?   That might be a top notch plan.

 

 

REI and box stores are quite unlikely to have what you will need.

post #10 of 20

Footloose in Mammoth would be my first choice for boot fitter for you. Weather is still nice right now. Call, make an appointment and make a trip up. It will be worth your while. Remember "custom" does not always mean expensive. For a big guy like you, they very well could have a clearance boot that would work and also remember, a good err the right pair of boots could/should last you through your first 2-3 pair of skis. There is a saying we coined.."You date your skis, but you marry your boots". 

post #11 of 20
With size 15 AA feet, I was able to rent 33.5 mondo boots and 180 cm skis at most Pocono resorts in PA. When I realized they were too big, I downsized to 31.5 boots then bought some Lange RX 100 in that size as my first boots, but I'm 6'7 and 230 lb, so not too stiff for me. However, I recently went to my local shop and tried on down to 29.5 size boots. Those were a hair too short for a performance fit, but the toe box probably could be stretched according to the fitter. Problem is my feet are classic low volume and they don't stock those boots at my local shop in a +100 flex in my size. So I may just wait on new boots until I visit a real mountain with good shops this season. I ski Rossignol Experience 83 skis in 184 cm, which are fine for my size as a beginner ski, but not stout enough for you. I've been demoing more advanced skis, and love them, but most demos around here don't stock +180 cm skis.mad.gif

All this is too say that a regional shop/resort not in a prime area probably can't stock what a Clyde will need. I'm sure Philpug knows what he's talking about concerning the shops in Mammoth.
post #12 of 20
Full disclosure: I had my company physical today and, just turning 57 last week, I've started to shrink. I was only 6'6"!
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

I am new to skiing and this forum. I am very new to skiing but would like to start this year. .....like to ski some more advanced runs at some point going low and slow like the old fogey I am. I also have size 16 shoes so I don't know if boot sizes are the same as shoe sizes. I appreciate any help you guys can give me. 

hahhahahah

 

"Rugby Heretic" ... that says it all. I've hit Steamboat on the Cowboy downhills, those nuts couldn't care less if they fell let alone falling hard, simply a fun time for them. Rugby ... well, might be more nuts than Rodeo Cowboys!

 

Surprised you just don't nail boards onto your feet and not complain of pain!

 

but in serious note, yeah, +1 on Philpugs recommendation, hit a shop early, call em first and let them know your foot. Maybe if not in stock they can get some in before your visit.

 

Not that this relate strictly correct, but size 16 relates roughly to 34 mondo, many here go down 1-2 sizes which often depends on liner thickness. so one can readily think 32 or so.

 

Anyhow, good bootfitter for your size and options would be worthwhile. Given the options even online, I would hedge my bet with a fitter as the price may be only around 25% more .. which I'm really a tight *ss, well, Frugal, but given the options and cost, well worth a bootfitter.

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

I am new to skiing and this forum. I am very new to skiing but would like to start this year. I did ski once at Bear Valley in the early 1980's when I had less rings on my trunk (tall and skinny) but only had rentals to use. I am 6'5 and 300 pounds. I am a definite beginner. I won't be doping anything crazy but would like to ski some more advanced runs at some point going low and slow like the old fogey I am. I also have size 16 shoes so I don't know if boot sizes are the same as shoe sizes. I appreciate any help you guys can give me. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

I live just down the hill from Big Bear in southern California. We have some good ski shops within an hour or so. But with California not even thinking that we will be getting snow because of the drought no one is stocking much yet. I will definitely be taking lots of lessons or upping my insurance plan. :). I think getting a custom fit is the best route even though more expensive than off the rack. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

Thanks for the information. I will go to the Big Bear/Mammoth threads tonight. I haven't been to a ski shop as it seems that I have a choice between REI, other sporting goods shops, and maybe one private out fitter. Not too much in the land of the drought and sun I guess. Many of the stores I called strictly do snow boarding so not much help there. I might have to take a weekend off and head up to Utah to see my uncle and hit a shop. Finding boots might be a lot like Inspector Clouseau looking for the Pink Panther. I appreciate all the responses. 

Completely forgot about this Beginner Zone thread by a young big guy.  Those Clydes who answered learned as older adults.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/132661/beginner-big-guy-a-beginner-zone-thread

 

The tag for "Clydesdale Ski Gear" under Topics Discussed is a link to a list of relevant threads.  Tags are added manually, so the threads are usually pretty helpful.

post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 

@  cantunamunch...My uncle is in St. George. 

 

@ pete...I have slowed my injuries to a trickle by working with a local youth rugby team. When I tell them I have had broken ribs, a detached retina, dislocated my ankle twice, fractured a cheek bone, and that doesn't count the minor injuries some never show up again. If they do show up I know they are as crazy as they can be. My primary care doctor knows me so well he invites me to his Christmas party. :) 

 

To everyone who has posted advice...I do appreciate it very much and will hopefully see some of you on the slopes. You will know me...I am the one with boards nailed to my feet. 


Edited by Rugby Heretic - 10/8/15 at 7:54am
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

He is in St. George


Assuming you mean St. George, UT, that's 4 hours from SLC.  Seems like checking with Footloose at Mammoth makes more sense.  Phil is one of the more knowledgeable guys around EpicSki when it comes to gear.

post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 

1  Find a recommendation for a bootfitter near to you and get some boots properly fitted for you - that will cost but is the best money you'll spend.

 

2 Skis - standard rental fodder may be a bit too floppy for you so talk to the bootfitter who has assessed you about what skis you should be looking to rent.  Remember standard advice won't apply as a ski that is wider/longer/stiffer than the norm for a beginner may well behave the same for you.

 

3 Lessons Lessons Lessons

 

^^^ Great foundation for a good start

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

I live just down the hill from Big Bear in southern California. We have some good ski shops within an hour or so. But with California not even thinking that we will be getting snow because of the drought no one is stocking much yet. I will definitely be taking lots of lessons or upping my insurance plan. :). I think getting a custom fit is the best route even though more expensive than off the rack. 

Is there a possibility to get up to Mammoth? 

If you can get to Mammoth, you should get to Footloose. Footloose Sports 

 

If you don't get anything else at this time, getting set up with good boots that fit you well is essential to your success. 

 

*I'll check with some of my resources to see if there is a bootfitter closer to you. 

post #18 of 20

Big +1 to what Philpug said. Footloose in Mammoth is a great shop.

 

I'm in soCal, too, and having bought boots in the past from REI, I'd say stay clear. The expertise is not there. There is one shop in the Valley (Studio City) that is open limited hours. The owner has fans and detractors, the latter due to his Soup Nazi 'tude in the world of selling ski boots. There is one ski shop in Santa Monica, I think it's still there, and I believe SureFoot has a store somewhere out there on the Westside. Again, lots of fans & detractors for the Surefoot business model.

 

Anyway, best wishes, let's hope for lots of snow in the southland.

:Ott

 

p.s. I bought my current boots at Snowind Sports in Reno a few years ago and got them adjusted last season at Footloose. Skiing opens up great travel opportunities!

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 


Assuming you mean St. George, UT, that's 4 hours from SLC.  Seems like checking with Footloose at Mammoth makes more sense.  Phil is one of the more knowledgeable guys around EpicSki when it comes to gear.

 


Dunno - anyone got any recommendations for a Bootfitter at Brian Head.  I remember stopping by & having a chat with a store owner who was an 1860 Munich fan when I went through - Georgi?

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rugby Heretic View Post
 

@  cantunamunch...My uncle is in St. George. 

 

@ pete...I have slowed my injuries to a trickle by working with a local youth rugby team. When I tell them I have had broken ribs, a detached retina, dislocated my ankle twice, fractured a cheek bone, and that doesn't count the minor injuries some never show up again. If they do show up I know they are as crazy as they can be. My primary care doctor knows me so well he invites me to his Christmas party. :) 

 

To everyone who has posted advice...I do appreciate it very much and will hopefully see some of you on the slopes. You will know me...I am the one with boards nailed to my feet. 

 

@Rugby Heretic

 

Well, better your MD invites you to Christmas parties than your Proctologist!

 

Yeah, I just started watching Rugby and still trying to figure it out. I can claim to be a fan of the Blacks and not just because their leaders but that my spouse lived in NZ as exchange in High School.

 

My bud used to play, he was shorter, stocky and a thick neck that left him as the Hooker. He didn't hold out as you did, 3-4 broken smaller bones and finally a collar bone told him it was time to call it quits.

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