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Would you buy a moldable liner in two different sizes or thickness? - Page 2

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 

. I'd rather just have a replacement stock liner if a zipfit or foam liner was out of the budget.

 

Yeh, the current RS130 liners frex are really, really sweet. 

post #32 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post
 

Your product knowledge awesome. Tom at Intution feels the only shell for me with the room I need in the toe box is the Dreamliner. He said if I was working with a good boot fitter I might be able to use the Pro Tongue but the heel has to be fit correctly or the foot is pushed forward. I see several posts about the the liner being pretty painful for the first 2-3 times you ski. I wonder what size sock I should use. I use silk ultra thin socks but for this process maybe a thicker sock is needed. In addition I was going to cut off the front of a wool sock and add it to my toes then the cap to make sure I have room in the toebox. 

 

Forgive me if I missed this in the shuffle, but are you planning to mold the liner yourself? If you have the option to work with a boot fitter who has experience molding Intuition liners that'll be a very wise $40 or so spent.

 

See what others with have to say, but my take is if you start with your usual thin sock if/as the liner packs out a bit over time you can then go to a slightly thicker sock to snug the fit back up.

 

And yes, Tuna really knows his sh*t!     ;-)

Cannot find a competent boot fitter near me. 

post #33 of 39

Then you have three choices. All involve some patience. None involve doing your own heating, which without experience doing it will be at best suboptimal and at worst catastrophic.  

 

1) If these are Dreamliners (which I own for my RS130's), then they do not require heating. Read up on them at the Intuition site. Dreamliners alone among Intuitions are designed not to be heated or molded, and IME do better without it. (I've tried it both ways.) So what you do is put them into your boots, and ski them. They will be super snug (ideally) for the first two or three days, then just a bit too tight for another day or two, then just right for several seasons. If you heat them, you'll reduce the break-in, but also the lifespan.

 

Incidentally, despite the name, they're decently firm and supportive liners, not plushy soft by any means. About a neutral density IMO, meaning they won't increase the flex of your boots 5-15 pts like most Intuitions. They won't last quite as long as some other models, like the Power Wrap, but they still should be good for 100-150 days minimum unless you race. Finally, make sure with Intuition that you should have the same size as your shell. I had to size up one notch for my shell to create more room for my forefoot; a larger liner means the foam pushes inward instead of getting stretched outward. Each brand of shell will be different; Langes run small. 

 

1) Wait on tweaks assuming you have had the shell stretched for your forefoot issues. If your home mountain has a shop, it'll probably be better than a bog box store down by the strip mall. And you won't know if you even need tweaks until you've used these for a week. Give it time. I'd be surprised if you need any. Keep in mind that if you thin out a liner, then the nice hard shell is that much closer to your bone. Bunions or 6th toes are a shell problem, not a liner problem, and you don't want to sacrifice liner as a quick and dirty solution.

 

2) Travel if necessary. If you've spent this many hours agonizing over which liner, which boot, which ski, which (fill in the blank), and keeping in mind that time = money via opportunity costs, and keeping in mind that the Intuitions are an investment, and they lose some give every heating or molding cycle, then accept that you may have to hop in your car and drive to the nearest decent shop. Even if it's in the next state. This will involve checking here about where that might be, calling, arranging an appointment, and taking a Saturday or Thursday night or whatever to get it done. Man up. 

post #34 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Then you have three choices. All involve some patience. None involve doing your own heating, which without experience doing it will be at best suboptimal and at worst catastrophic.  

 

1) If these are Dreamliners (which I own for my RS130's), then they do not require heating. Read up on them at the Intuition site. Dreamliners alone among Intuitions are designed not to be heated or molded, and IME do better without it. (I've tried it both ways.) So what you do is put them into your boots, and ski them. They will be super snug (ideally) for the first two or three days, then just a bit too tight for another day or two, then just right for several seasons. If you heat them, you'll reduce the break-in, but also the lifespan.

 

Incidentally, despite the name, they're decently firm and supportive liners, not plushy soft by any means. About a neutral density IMO, meaning they won't increase the flex of your boots 5-15 pts like most Intuitions. They won't last quite as long as some other models, like the Power Wrap, but they still should be good for 100-150 days minimum unless you race. Finally, make sure with Intuition that you should have the same size as your shell. I had to size up one notch for my shell to create more room for my forefoot; a larger liner means the foam pushes inward instead of getting stretched outward. Each brand of shell will be different; Langes run small. 

 

1) Wait on tweaks assuming you have had the shell stretched for your forefoot issues. If your home mountain has a shop, it'll probably be better than a bog box store down by the strip mall. And you won't know if you even need tweaks until you've used these for a week. Give it time. I'd be surprised if you need any. Keep in mind that if you thin out a liner, then the nice hard shell is that much closer to your bone. Bunions or 6th toes are a shell problem, not a liner problem, and you don't want to sacrifice liner as a quick and dirty solution.

 

2) Travel if necessary. If you've spent this many hours agonizing over which liner, which boot, which ski, which (fill in the blank), and keeping in mind that time = money via opportunity costs, and keeping in mind that the Intuitions are an investment, and they lose some give every heating or molding cycle, then accept that you may have to hop in your car and drive to the nearest decent shop. Even if it's in the next state. This will involve checking here about where that might be, calling, arranging an appointment, and taking a Saturday or Thursday night or whatever to get it done. Man up. 

Thanks, Tom from Intuition has recommended the Dreamliner and for me to heat mold it. I fit boots for 10 years but that was over 20 years ago. My current boots are punched out where they need to be.

post #35 of 39

OK, all good, then, will defer to Intuition. If you heat them inside shells, be careful about folds or creases when you put your foot in, may help to have two people, one to pull your boots apart. And lubricant helps. There are some excellent threads over at TGR about how well, or not, the rice bag method goes, some nice tips. Good luck. 

post #36 of 39
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your help.

post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

... last spring I bought a pair of Intuition Luxury liners online, and had them heat-molded by a local boot fitter I work with.

 

My liners are tongue style with a drawstring. Never had one of those before, and initial impression is good - once foot is in it's nice to be able to cinch the liner tight before buckling the boot and tightening the power strap. But where do you typically stash the extra drawstring/etc? Seems like the obvious spot between inside of tongue and calf could be a problem.

 

I will experiment to see what might work best, but am curious what others do.

post #38 of 39

Out of the boot, behind the power strap works for me. 

post #39 of 39
Thread Starter 
I just received mine and I was thinking the exact same thing where do I put these strings. Another question is I always place my booster over the tongue not the outside shell I wonder if that's going to work okay.
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