or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Glove or Mitten Suggestions for Cold Hands
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Glove or Mitten Suggestions for Cold Hands - Page 2

post #31 of 59

So, surprisingly, the best liner/underglove I've ever found is a Burton synthetic. They do fall apart eventually because they're thin, just like silk, but I have always had dry hands with them - they wick better than anything I've experienced. And they're not expensive.  http://www.burton.com/default/touchscreen-liner/W16-103191.html?cgid=mens-snowboard-glove-liners  .. last season I stocked up on several extra pairs. Evo has them for less than $10 right now: http://www.evo.com/outlet/gloves/burton-touchscreen-liner-14.aspx

post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

So, surprisingly, the best liner/underglove I've ever found is a Burton synthetic. They do fall apart eventually because they're thin, just like silk, but I have always had dry hands with them - they wick better than anything I've experienced. And they're not expensive.  http://www.burton.com/default/touchscreen-liner/W16-103191.html?cgid=mens-snowboard-glove-liners  .. last season I stocked up on several extra pairs. Evo has them for less than $10 right now: http://www.evo.com/outlet/gloves/burton-touchscreen-liner-14.aspx

Great signature!

post #33 of 59
Thread Starter 

My hesitation with FTP is that I have gone the value route before only to run into things that have really been cheap.

 

All the thought processes behind the gloves on their website make a lot of sense. And the online response after a year is that they are quality.

 

Having been skunked in the past has me hedging towards one of the Hestra models, which FTP seems to try and directly compare itself too frequently and use as somewhat of a baseline.

 

The FTP advantage is that even at full price getting both a glove and mitten would give me some versatility in various temps.

 

I am a resort skier, so I can always leave one in the bag back at a lodge if I need to swap things out.

 

The BD Mercury Mitt would be in my price range, and they are getting some love for being warm.

post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralVT08 View Post
 

My hesitation with FTP is that I have gone the value route before only to run into things that have really been cheap.

 

All the thought processes behind the gloves on their website make a lot of sense. And the online response after a year is that they are quality.

 

Having been skunked in the past has me hedging towards one of the Hestra models, which FTP seems to try and directly compare itself too frequently and use as somewhat of a baseline.

 

The FTP advantage is that even at full price getting both a glove and mitten would give me some versatility in various temps.

 

I am a resort skier, so I can always leave one in the bag back at a lodge if I need to swap things out.

 

The BD Mercury Mitt would be in my price range, and they are getting some love for being warm.

 

I just don't believe the FTP story about them being warm. *So many times* I have had people with, I guess, functional circulation in their hands, or whatever, tell me that such and such glove or mitten is super warm. Only to find that they were barely better than wet tissue paper for me. Google "hunter's reflex." I hate those people.

post #35 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

I just don't believe the FTP story about them being warm. *So many times* I have had people with, I guess, functional circulation in their hands, or whatever, tell me that such and such glove or mitten is super warm. Only to find that they were barely better than wet tissue paper for me.

That has been a concern of mine as well. That is one reason why I asked about direct comparisons. @Bob Lee  noted the FTP are not as warm as the BD Guide, and that makes sense given they are about 50 grams less in insulation and not as burly in construction.

 

Jumping up form a Costco glove is obviously going to make a big difference. The key here is trying to figure out the best use of my money.

 

FTP sounds like they have a lot going for them. Hestra seems to have both a decent price within the higher end glove market, and a long term quality reputation.

post #36 of 59
FTP gloves are warm and well made, and they're an exceptional value, but they're not as warm as the BD Guide.

If you can afford the BD gloves and suffer from cold hands, you won't regret spending the money when you're out on the hill.
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralVT08 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

I just don't believe the FTP story about them being warm. *So many times* I have had people with, I guess, functional circulation in their hands, or whatever, tell me that such and such glove or mitten is super warm. Only to find that they were barely better than wet tissue paper for me.

That has been a concern of mine as well. That is one reason why I asked about direct comparisons. @Bob Lee  noted the FTP are not as warm as the BD Guide, and that makes sense given they are about 50 grams less in insulation and not as burly in construction.

 

Jumping up form a Costco glove is obviously going to make a big difference. The key here is trying to figure out the best use of my money.

 

FTP sounds like they have a lot going for them. Hestra seems to have both a decent price within the higher end glove market, and a long term quality reputation.

 

Here's a data point about Hestra. Yes, they are expensive. I managed to rip out the little fabric loop to which the "handcuff" attaches. I contacted them, and they said to send my mittens to them, which I did. They returned the mittens - except they were too big, and pretty smelly - very clearly not my mittens, although they had required the same work. So I contacted them again, asking if I should send them back. Instead, they sent me a new pair of mittens and didn't even want me to return the others - they must have sent a new pair to the other person as well. Then I asked if it would be possible for them to send me a different color, and they said sure! So not only were they going to fix a minor issue with my mittens for free, but when they messed up, they were happy to send me new mittens without asking anything in return (ie, they took my word for the nasty wrong mittens, didn't require that I send them back, etc.)

 

Customer service IMO is one of the list of good reasons for products to be more expensive.

 

I should also mention that I don't think it's easy to rip out that loop - I was at an avy clinic, participating in a race to see who could go from having pack on back to having all the necessary gear ready the fastest - in my haste, the cord between mitten and handcuff got looped around the backpack strap and yanked off. When she saw that, the instructor (Elyse Saugstad) said that even in an avalanche, her Hestras had stayed attached via that strap. So I either got very unlucky, or I am stronger than an avalanche ;-)

 

I've also replaced the liners at least once to improve the loft, essentially getting myself "new" mittens for the price of their liners.

post #38 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

Customer service IMO is one of the list of good reasons for products to be more expensive.

 

 

I've also replaced the liners at least once to improve the loft, essentially getting myself "new" mittens for the price of their liners.

I certainly value customer service myself, and have been willing to pay more for things just because of that.

 

The replaceable liners on the Heli Mitts are a major plus. As has been noted by @L&AirC you can get other inserts to replace of bulk up the insulation.

 

@DesiredUsername also makes the insulation sound like they are top notch, comparing well to the BD Mercury Mitt.

 

Overall there is clearly a small group of gloves from FTP, BD, and Hestra people are endorsing repeatedly.

post #39 of 59
Also my GF loves her Mountain Hardware gloves, outdry shell with removable liners. That said, her hands get sweaty and she often has to remove the liners to dry out at lunch breaks. So warm and insulation is one factor, and breatthability just as important for keeping your hands dry and warm.
post #40 of 59

Lots of good suggestions.  I'll 2nd the suggestion that no matter what glove/mitt you choose wear thin liner gloves.  Bring a spare set and swap them out when your hands start to get damp.  I've had a lot of -30 to -40 days outside and those liner gloves can work magic.  I also carry a spare set (and a spare neck tube) for my kids.  Helps to keep them on the slopes an extra few hours when their 1st pair is damp and the chill is seeping in.

post #41 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanmoreBruce View Post
 

Lots of good suggestions.  I'll 2nd the suggestion that no matter what glove/mitt you choose wear thin liner gloves.  Bring a spare set and swap them out when your hands start to get damp.  I've had a lot of -30 to -40 days outside and those liner gloves can work magic.  I also carry a spare set (and a spare neck tube) for my kids.  Helps to keep them on the slopes an extra few hours when their 1st pair is damp and the chill is seeping in.

I definitely back the extra pair at lunch for hands, neck, and face. Even on an average day sweat and breathe can get a lot of things pretty wet.

 

I also back the general idea with OutDry. It makes little sense for the waterproofing to be on the interior liner--nobody wears their hardshell underneath their midlayer! Hestra's approach with a lot of their gloves with removable liners seems to be the same, though not with the OutDry tech.

post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post
 

................. I wear mittens.  I find them warmer and safer. 

 

Rewind back to post #3.   Why do you say they are safer?

post #43 of 59

The warmest things for me were a pair of leather sheepskin mittens. Conventional leather outer skin finish, elasticated cuffs and curved to making gripping easier. I bought them from C&As in the UK in about 1980 and they were still keeping my hands warm on really cold days 30 years later. 

 

I would wear a pair of these stretchy 'magic' gloves as inners in extreme conditions mainly to allow me to remove the mittten without getting my hand[s] cold.

post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

I just don't believe the FTP story about them being warm. *So many times* I have had people with, I guess, functional circulation in their hands, or whatever, tell me that such and such glove or mitten is super warm. Only to find that they were barely better than wet tissue paper for me. Google "hunter's reflex." I hate those people.


Hate is a strong word. Why would I lie about the warmth of my FTP gloves? Besides, how can you hate on Thurman the Ermine?

 

 

I wish Gates hadn't gone under; they made great, reasonably priced gloves/mittens too... 

 

On a side-note; the first Winter we lived in Georgetown, I saw an ermine tackle and kill a field mouse in the yard. Goddammit but they are cute little critters. Cute and DEADLY!!!:eek

Hmm, maybe not the best mascot for a pair of gloves/mittens?

 

Rabbit from the Holy Grail anyone?


Edited by MT Skull - 9/26/15 at 1:23pm
post #45 of 59
I think one issue is we need to separate your hands getting cold vs fingers getting cold my hands are never cold but I always have two or three fingers on one hand it always gets cold
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

I just don't believe the FTP story about them being warm. *So many times* I have had people with, I guess, functional circulation in their hands, or whatever, tell me that such and such glove or mitten is super warm. Only to find that they were barely better than wet tissue paper for me. Google "hunter's reflex." I hate those people.


Hate is a strong word. Why would I lie about the warmth of my FTP gloves? Besides, how can you hate on Thurman the Ermine?

 

 

I wish Gates hadn't gone under; they made great, reasonably priced gloves/mittens too... 

 

On a side-note; the first Winter we lived in Georgetown, I saw an ermine tackle and kill a field mouse in the yard. Goddammit but they are cute little critters. Cute and DEADLY!!!:eek

Hmm, maybe not the best mascot for a pair of gloves/mittens?

 

Rabbit from the Holy Grail anyone?

 

 

They *are* cute, it's true. I meant I hate people with hunter's reflex. You know, like my husband ;-)

post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

 

They *are* cute, it's true. I meant I hate people with hunter's reflex. You know, like my husband ;-)

 

 Are you talking about cold fingers or shooting vermin? Hunter's/hunting response/reaction/reflex", is a syndrome that causes alternating extemity vasoconstriction and vasodilation in response to cold exposure.

post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

 

They *are* cute, it's true. I meant I hate people with hunter's reflex. You know, like my husband ;-)

 

 Are you talking about cold fingers or shooting vermin? Hunter's/hunting response/reaction/reflex", is a syndrome that causes alternating extemity vasoconstriction and vasodilation in response to cold exposure.

 

Yes, that's what I'm talking about.

post #49 of 59

Bought three pairs of gloves/mittens last year after checking this forum and many reviews.  In order of keeping hands warmest:

 

1) Hestra Army Leather Extreme Mittens

2) Free the Powder Short-Cuff Gloves

3) Hestra Fall Line Gloves

 

 

Hestra Army Extreme mittens kept hands toastiest, by far, with downside of dexterity loss.  Not as nimble as the gloves or other mittens I've used.  

Free the Powder gloves were very impressive at keeping hands warm and dry at a really low pricetag.  Best buy of the three.

Hestra Fall Line Gloves look good and are great to ski with, but dampness seeped through and made hands cold.  Still like them but will probably wear them only when temps are above 30 F.

 

All of these are of very good quality material.  If I had it to do over, would have bought Free the Powder gloves and mittens.  Would have saved money and the FtP mittens would be warm while not as bulky as the Hestra mittens, resulting in a better choice for skiing.

post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiersLeft View Post
 

 

Rewind back to post #3.   Why do you say they are safer?

 

Ever snag a pinkie on something during a tumble?  Not in mittens.

post #51 of 59

Based on this (http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Ski-Gloves-Reviews/ratings) and what people have said here and on other threads, you might want to consider the BD Mercury Mitt, if you're willing to get a mitten.  For a glove, I'd consider the BD guide.  It's rated as highly for warmth as the Hestra, but better for water resistance.  I'm guessing those who complain about the Hestra not keeping their hands warm during skiing might actually be having an issue with water resistance, i.e. with the insulation in their gloves becoming damp.  You'll really notice the latter when digging out a car.


Edited by chemist - 9/26/15 at 11:18pm
post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemist View Post
 

Based on this (http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Ski-Gloves-Reviews/ratings) and what people have said here and on other threads, you might want to consider the BD Mercury Mitt, if you're willing to get a mitten.  For a glove, I'd consider the BD guide.  It's rated as highly for warmth as the Hestra, but better for water resistance.  I'm guessing those who complain about the Hestra not keeping their hands warm during skiing might actually be having an issue with water resistance, i.e. with the insulation in their gloves becoming damp.  You'll really notice the latter when digging out a car.

 

In  my ski crew, we have some Mercury Mitts and some Hestra Helis. They must be pretty similar, because those with the Mercuries seem to think the Helis are warmer, and vice versa!

post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiersLeft View Post
 

 

Rewind back to post #3.   Why do you say they are safer?

 

Ever snag a pinkie on something during a tumble?  Not in mittens.

I usually hear of thumb injuries (jam/snag) which is still an issue with either hand wear, but I see your point.

post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiersLeft View Post
 
Quote:
I usually hear of thumb injuries (jam/snag) which is still an issue with either hand wear, but I see your point.

 

I can attest to the fact that you can still jam your thumb in mittens ;-)

post #55 of 59

I never liked mittens but after a couple of brutal cold northeast seasons I finally compromised and bought the Black Diamond Guide 3-Fingers (lobster) last season. I have to say they are great. I actually think the dexterity ends up being a little better than the gloves because there isn't so much bulk around your outer fingers, and having the index finger separate is really all you need for pole straps, goggles and picking things up. There's even enough room in the larger pocket to pull your index finger in with the others if its extremely cold or you just need to warm it up on the chair. That room also makes it easy to get a heat packet in there, which I ended up doing on a sub zero morning. I still stick with my gloves (Arc'teryx Zenta AR, Marmot Randonee) when the temps are above 15-20F, but the BDs have made me much happier when the temps get bitter.

post #56 of 59

Electric gloves or mittens.  Outdoor Research has good ones.  Carry an extra battery pack.

http://www.outdoorresearch.com/en/lucent-heated-gloves.html

 

Keep in mind how the fingers (& toes) get warmth.  Blood circulation brings this to the extremities.  If the body doesn't send the blood circulation needed, for whatever reason, you'll get cold.  The electrically heated gloves (& insoles) add warmth, not just insulate and save what should be there but sometimes isn't.

post #57 of 59

Hestra Under the cuff leather mittens served me very well last year, and I'm not really a mitten guy. -10 at Stratton and MRG kind of forced the issue.

Sweaty hands weren't an issue, they have individual finger glove liners in the glove.

 

-GR

post #58 of 59

I would also suggest sizing your gloves a little larger so you have more air space and room for liners...

post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

In  my ski crew, we have some Mercury Mitts and some Hestra Helis. They must be pretty similar, because those with the Mercuries seem to think the Helis are warmer, and vice versa!

I have both, and I find that Mercuries are definitely warmer. Helis are more dextrous, though. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Glove or Mitten Suggestions for Cold Hands