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Looking for first skis - Intermediate Male skiing Argentenia

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I would need some help choosing my first skis. My current level is low intermmediate, but I want them to be good for at least three seasons. I dont have boots yet, but I will pick them in person.

 

I will use them in Argentina, mostly on piste

 

My data:

Height: 1.84

Weight: 76kg

 

Im looking for something below $400, bindings included.

 

My current picks are:

http://www.levelninesports.com/Head-Rev-78-R-Wprd-11-Bindings?sub_id=36233

http://www.levelninesports.com/Fischer-Progressor-800-Skis-W-Rsx-12-Bindings?sub_id=35643

http://www.levelninesports.com/Salomon-Xdrive-75-Skis-Wz10-Bindings?sub_id=36459

 

 

Thanks

 

Mod note: initial confusion with OP's other thread for his wife

post #2 of 24
Thread Starter 
Why did they merge two posts that are not related?
post #3 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamafe View Post

Why did they merge two posts that are not related?


They are related.  You are looking for your first pair of skis.  You are more likely to get good advice with only one thread.  It's normal for the discussion to cover multiple options.  We are trying to help.  Please have a little patience.  It's pre-season and most people only check in once in a while.

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 
Yes, thats true. But one thread was for me and the other one for my wife. Completely different gear. I dont know how we will know what we are talking about with both threads merged
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamafe View Post

Yes, thats true. But one thread was for me and the other one for my wife. Completely different gear. I dont know how we will know what we are talking about with both threads merged


Sorry I didn't look at the models.  I try to help new members, but do not pay that much attention to skis.  Especially men's skis since I'm a woman.  The way you wrote the posts, it was not at all clear because both said "I need help . . .". I still think it's better to have one thread but I will clarify Post #1.  If that doesn't work, I suggest you start another thread in a week or so.

 

Mod note: threads separated

post #6 of 24

Paging @Philpug 

post #7 of 24

Hi @pamafe  Welcome to EpicSki. 

Its always fun to get your first skis.  

Of the skis you listed, I'd be most concerned with the Progressor for an intermediate.  That's a pretty quick ski. 

The Head Rev 85 may be a better choice if you're looking at the Head Rev line, but I'll defer to the men who've had some experience on it. 

 

@mtcyclist  @markojp @Philpug @Whiteroom  

post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 

Come on guys! Give me some good advice, I have to buy them this month! :)

post #9 of 24

Do you have boot? Usually, it started with boots first, ski second... bad boots would destroy any good skis (and possibly a skier as well).

post #10 of 24

OK, if you do have boots, then I like the Progressor for sure, I'd look for a Salomon X-Drive 80, and maybe a K2 AMP Rictor 82. Take a look at Elan Amphibios if you can. Your price point is tough, but try some other online stores like SkiEssentials, Powder 7, or of course eBay, before you buy. 

 

Put another way, something that will grow with you, that has a bit more upside than two of the skis you mention. The Head REV85 is a great all purpose ski, but is more aimed at softer snow than on-piste. If you intend to be off-piste more than say 20% of your time, that's a good call too. 

post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 

I dont have boots yet. I will buy them personally

post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

OK, if you do have boots, then I like the Progressor for sure, I'd look for a Salomon X-Drive 80, and maybe a K2 AMP Rictor 82. Take a look at Elan Amphibios if you can. Your price point is tough, but try some other online stores like SkiEssentials, Powder 7, or of course eBay, before you buy. 

 

Put another way, something that will grow with you, that has a bit more upside than two of the skis you mention. The Head REV85 is a great all purpose ski, but is more aimed at softer snow than on-piste. If you intend to be off-piste more than say 20% of your time, that's a good call toHi. 

Hi. Thanks for the help.

What do you mean by "if you have the boots, then I like the Progressors"?

I thought I could fit any boot to those, since the site says 

"The RSX 12 bindings come included with a Din Range of 3.5-12 and are adjustable from 257-380mm which covers most men's boot sizes."

 

By the way, my boot size is 27.5 or 28.

 

I dont know how this works, but my idea was that I can buy a system ski with binding online, and then buy the boots personally, to make sure they fit ok. And that the binding will be configurable to match my boot.

 

Is there something Im not considering?

post #13 of 24

Hi - "If you have the boots" means, "if you already have a pair of boots that are good quality, that fit you well." Yes, any boots will fit any system, or binding that you have mounted. Don't worry about buying "a system." A system is just a binding that the company mounted to the ski at the factory.

 

But like many here, I believe that good skiing experiences begin with the boot, not the ski. If your boots are sloppy or hurt, no ski in the world will make it fun. 

 

As far as your idea about buying, sure. Getting the boots in a real store, fitted by a real person, is important. Ideally, at a store near the ski slope. Skis, depends. You should do fine buying online. 

post #14 of 24

From the OP's other thread about skis for his wife:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pamafe View Post
 

Hi Mike,

 

Thanks for the info.

I will be buying the boots while on vacation in FL.  Thats not the best place to buy ski gear for sure, I know.

I was thinking about going to peterglenn and try the boots there. I dont know if they have good fitters, or if they have boot fitters at all.

The rest of the equipment, I was thinking on buying in advance, specially the skis.

But I do understand that the boots are the most important piece of gear.

 

Regards

post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Hi - "If you have the boots" means, "if you already have a pair of boots that are good quality, that fit you well." Yes, any boots will fit any system, or binding that you have mounted. Don't worry about buying "a system." A system is just a binding that the company mounted to the ski at the factory.

 

But like many here, I believe that good skiing experiences begin with the boot, not the ski. If your boots are sloppy or hurt, no ski in the world will make it fun. 

 

As far as your idea about buying, sure. Getting the boots in a real store, fitted by a real person, is important. Ideally, at a store near the ski slope. Skis, depends. You should do fine buying online. 

i will be visiting only FL, and trying the boots at Peterglenn, so "near the slope" is not an option :)

post #16 of 24
If you are going to purchase boots at Peter Glenn, go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis about fitting and terminology several times so you have a decent understanding of how a ski boot should be fitted because the odds are not good that you will find someone there who knows how to do it properly.
post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 

A couple more options to add to the list, that are also in my budget

 

$285

http://www.skis.com/Dynastar-Powertrack-79-Fluid-Skis-with-NX-11-Bindings-2015/382403P,default,pd.html

 

(is 1.66 too short for me?)

 

$337

http://www.skis.com/K2-AMP-80-X-Skis-with-Marker-M3-10-Q-Bindings-2014/392454P,default,pd.html

 

What do you think?

post #18 of 24

It just a wild guess, but I think that very low model of skis (the one which you probably would change in a season or even less) are comes with binding up to 10 DIN, intermediate to advance DIN is 12 and everything 14 and after is expert (14-15-18-20 dins, etc are race/sport related and no need recreation skiers).

Based on this theory, I would look for skis with binding system with din 11 up to 12. The ski guru would correct me if I am wrong.

post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg S View Post
 

It just a wild guess, but I think that very low model of skis (the one which you probably would change in a season or even less) are comes with binding up to 10 DIN, intermediate to advance DIN is 12 and everything 14 and after is expert (14-15-18-20 dins, etc are race/sport related and no need recreation skiers).

Based on this theory, I would look for skis with binding system with din 11 up to 12. The ski guru would correct me if I am wrong.

For what I have seen, the models that have DIN 11 or 12 are those marked as advanced. Then the question is, what would be the cons in buying a ski thats more on the advance side, for someone that is low intermmediate? Is it just a matter of price, or the stiffness also makes it harder to use?

 

Thanks

post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamafe View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg S View Post
 

It just a wild guess, but I think that very low model of skis (the one which you probably would change in a season or even less) are comes with binding up to 10 DIN, intermediate to advance DIN is 12 and everything 14 and after is expert (14-15-18-20 dins, etc are race/sport related and no need recreation skiers).

Based on this theory, I would look for skis with binding system with din 11 up to 12. The ski guru would correct me if I am wrong.

For what I have seen, the models that have DIN 11 or 12 are those marked as advanced. Then the question is, what would be the cons in buying a ski thats more on the advance side, for someone that is low intermmediate? Is it just a matter of price, or the stiffness also makes it harder to use?

 

Thanks


There are pros and cons.

Pro - the ski will actually grab into the snow and turn hard when you put it  on edge.

Con - the ski will actually grab into the snow and turn hard when you put it on edge.

 

Pro - instead of scaring the crap out of you when you ski fast, you will feel like you are in control.

Con - the ski will not scare the crap out of you when you ski fast.

 

Pro - you won't have to buy new skis next year.

Con - you won't have an  excuse to buy new skis next year.

 

Some beginners like advanced skis, some don't.  The ones that don't find the skis "unforgiving", meaning when they put an edge wrong, the ski exerts enough force to trip them up.  It also  can't be muscled out of the turn.  It takes off strongly in whatever direction the skis tipping and pressuring dictates, and if they can't keep up they fall.   The ones that like them feel that they can finally control where they are going instead of just being able to suggest which way to turn and have the ski sort of kinda turning a little, sort of in that direction. 

 

The one true con in getting an ski that is too advanced is that advanced skis need force to  make them bend into a deep (short radius) turn.  If you don't weigh much, this requires some speed.  Learning takes place better at slower speeds.   If you don't already have the turn mechanics down to bend an advanced ski you will learn faster and have more fun on a ski that is easy to bend.   Look for something that is easy to bend, but not easy to twist. 

 

As to bindings, the higher DIN bindings are more robust, not just the spring, but the casings too.  I always buy the higher DIN bindings for that reason, but I won't buy a binding that does not have my Chart DIN setting within it's range.

 

I think you would do well with a Kästle LX72 in a 170 cm length, but you won't find that for under $400.

 

Of the skis on your list, the Progressor 800 is the best bet.


Edited by Ghost - 9/23/15 at 10:04am
post #22 of 24


Between those two, I suggest you go with the Nomad.

post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


There are pros and cons.

Pro - the ski will actually grab into the snow and turn hard when you put it  on edge.

Con - the ski will actually grab into the snow and turn hard when you put it on edge.

 

Pro - instead of scaring the crap out of you when you ski fast, you will feel like you are in control

Con - the ski will not scare the crap out of you when you ski fast

 

Pro - you won't have to buy new skis next year.

Con - you wont have an  excuse to buy new skis next year.

 

Some beginners like advanced skis, some don't.  The ones that don't find the skis "unforgiving", meaning when they put an edge wrong, the ski exerts enough force to trip them up.  It also and can't be muscled out of the turn.  It takes off strongly in whatever direction the skis tipping and pressuring dictates, and if they can't keep up they fall.   The ones that like them feel that they can finally control where they are going instead of just being able to suggest which way to turn and have the ski sort of kinda turning a little, sort of in that direction. 

 

The one true con in getting an ski that is too advanced is that advanced skis need force to  make them bend into a deep (short radius) turn.  If you don't weight much, this requires some speed.  Learning takes place better at slower speeds.   If you don't already have the turn mechanics down to bend an advanced ski you will learn faster and have more fun on a ski that is easy to bend.   Look for something that is easy to bend, but not easy to twist. 

 

As to bindings, the higher DIN bindings are more robust, not just the spring, but the casings too.  I always buy the higher DIN bindings for that reason, but I won't buy a binding that does not have my Chart DIN setting within it's range.

 

I think you would do well with a Kästle LX72 in a 170 cm length, but you won't find that for under $400.

 

Of the skis on your list, the Progressor 800 is the best bet.

 

Wow! Thanks a lot for your answer. Very complete and clarifying.

What do you think of the last two I posted?

 

1.66m or 1.73m

http://www.skis.com/Dynastar-Powertrack-79-Fluid-Skis-with-NX-11-Bindings-2015/382403P,default,pd.html

1.67m or 1.74m

http://www.skis.com/Atomic-Nomad-Blackeye-Skis-with-XTO-12-Bindings-2015/360560P,default,pd.html

 

 

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamafe View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


There are pros and cons.

Pro - the ski will actually grab into the snow and turn hard when you put it  on edge.

Con - the ski will actually grab into the snow and turn hard when you put it on edge.

 

Pro - instead of scaring the crap out of you when you ski fast, you will feel like you are in control

Con - the ski will not scare the crap out of you when you ski fast

 

Pro - you won't have to buy new skis next year.

Con - you wont have an  excuse to buy new skis next year.

 

Some beginners like advanced skis, some don't.  The ones that don't find the skis "unforgiving", meaning when they put an edge wrong, the ski exerts enough force to trip them up.  It also and can't be muscled out of the turn.  It takes off strongly in whatever direction the skis tipping and pressuring dictates, and if they can't keep up they fall.   The ones that like them feel that they can finally control where they are going instead of just being able to suggest which way to turn and have the ski sort of kinda turning a little, sort of in that direction. 

 

The one true con in getting an ski that is too advanced is that advanced skis need force to  make them bend into a deep (short radius) turn.  If you don't weight much, this requires some speed.  Learning takes place better at slower speeds.   If you don't already have the turn mechanics down to bend an advanced ski you will learn faster and have more fun on a ski that is easy to bend.   Look for something that is easy to bend, but not easy to twist. 

 

As to bindings, the higher DIN bindings are more robust, not just the spring, but the casings too.  I always buy the higher DIN bindings for that reason, but I won't buy a binding that does not have my Chart DIN setting within it's range.

 

I think you would do well with a Kästle LX72 in a 170 cm length, but you won't find that for under $400.

 

Of the skis on your list, the Progressor 800 is the best bet.

 

Wow! Thanks a lot for your answer. Very complete and clarifying.

What do you think of the last two I posted?

 

1.66m or 1.73m

http://www.skis.com/Dynastar-Powertrack-79-Fluid-Skis-with-NX-11-Bindings-2015/382403P,default,pd.html

1.67m or 1.74m

http://www.skis.com/Atomic-Nomad-Blackeye-Skis-with-XTO-12-Bindings-2015/360560P,default,pd.html

 

 


Nomad.   1.67 cm if you prefer to make smaller turns, and 174 cm if you like to ski a little faster with wider turns. 

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