or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

AT Setup?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I just purchased a new pair of skis that will be used 95%+ percent of the time for lift serviced terrain.  If the weather treats us right this winter here in the Northeast, they will spend their time off the groomers.  My plan had been to put a pair of normal bindings on them but a friend of mine is trying to convince me to spend the extra money and get an AT setup.  I recently purchased new boots so the bindings would need to be compatible with traditional alpine boots.  Does it make sense to consider an AT binding or should I just stick with the original plan?  If there are AT bindings that I should consider, which ones.  

 

About me: I'm 5' 9" and 155lbs.  I want to spend more time in the backcountry but with three preteens and season passes we'll be spending the majority of our 30-40 days at the resort.  Realistically, a few days of backcountry a year would be a good year. 

post #2 of 15
if you are only going to use the AT setup three days a season & you have new traditional alpine boots, why not just opt for the Tyrolia Ambition 12 binding. I have talked with a few guys who have used this binding in Vermont, with good results. If you were to consider using the AT setup for many more days during season, only then would I consider going with a lighter AT boot and binding setup.

For this season, I have removed my Tyrolia Attack 13 bindings from my Dynastar Cham HM 97's and will be converting the Chams to an AT setup with Tyrolia Ambitions and my Lange RX 130's for a bit of a change up at Sugarbush. The Attack 13's have been relocated to new Atomic Vantage 90 cti's.

Good Luck.
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gostan View Post

if you are only going to use the AT setup three days a season & you have new traditional alpine boots, why not just opt for the Tyrolia Ambition 12 binding. I have talked with a few guys who have used this binding in Vermont, with good results. If you were to consider using the AT setup for many more days during season, only then would I consider going with a lighter AT boot and binding setup.

For this season, I have removed my Tyrolia Attack 13 bindings from my Dynastar Cham HM 97's and will be converting the Chams to an AT setup with Tyrolia Ambitions and my Lange RX 130's for a bit of a change up at Sugarbush. The Attack 13's have been relocated to new Atomic Vantage 90 cti's.

Good Luck.


Have you made this switch yet, and skied the Ambitions? I'm considering them and would love to hear your impressions. Thanks!

post #4 of 15
Maybe look at Salomon/Scott guardians as well.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by kvd23 View Post


Have you made this switch yet, and skied the Ambitions? I'm considering them and would love to hear your impressions. Thanks!
Unfortunately, i have only been out on my ice skis as there is only manmade snow with minimum terrain open in Vermont @ Sugarbush. MRG has not yet opened.
post #6 of 15
There are a bunch of frame bindings that would work.
What skis?
post #7 of 15

I have Baron's mounted on a pair of Vokyl Bridges. The binding works fine for minor AT stuff, but if I were more serious or planned on spending more time hiking/skiing, I'd opt for a lighter setup.  I use my regular alpine boots and again, they work fine as long as I'm not climbing for much over an hour.  For you, and the limited amount of time you expect to spend in the back country, I would prioritize with the frontside performance.

post #8 of 15

If going uphill means anything, go lighter.  Say Marker Tout 10/12 if you are stuck with alpine boots and frame bindings.  If you are serious about AT, go tech/Dynafit and save yourself years of denial that you need those beefy boots etc.....  Except when running gates, I skied last season exclusively on tech bindings/boots.

post #9 of 15
If you are only bc skiing 3 days a year you could just get trekkers.

I would not reconend skiing inbounds on a tech binding, but some people do it. A binding with minimal elasticity isnt the best choice inbounds.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

If you are only bc skiing 3 days a year you could just get trekkers.

 

 

No, just no.  Unless you are into inflicting needless pain on yourself.

post #11 of 15
Agreed, totally misses the point.
post #12 of 15
I dont know how long tours in the NE are, but that is an option. I wouldn't spend the money for an AT binding to do a few short tours a year in alpine boots, but thats me. It cant be worse than a splitboard.

The other option is to just buy a used touring ski with bindings, which might actually be cheaper.
Edited by clink83 - 12/20/15 at 4:04pm
post #13 of 15
I agree with Clink, although I've never used the Trekkers. If using your ski mostly frontside and ant better touring I'd get a pair of Atomic Trackers /Salomon Guardians. They are heavy but ski downhill like a regular alpine binding and they have a touring mode. I have these on my hard snow / everyday driver setup. I haven't turned with them yet but like how they ski. Tyrolia Adrenalines are also good but stack height is higher and thus downhill feel isn't quite as good. Most others compromise downhill performance, which I don't suggest f you mostly ski in bounds.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwrivers View Post

I agree with Clink, although I've never used the Trekkers. 

 

How can you agree with someone when you have never used?

 

FWIW, Trekkers, i.e. these things

 

are designed to inflict maximum pain and ensure you have a shitty day out.  I have used them once and would prefer to pull my toenails out with pliers than ever use them again.

 

I have also used Dukes for a couple of years in the mistaken belief I needed a beefy binding for the downhill. Uphill they are a PITA, being heavy and having a pivot point 2cm below your toes.

 

It took six years of stupidity and wasted money before I finally went to Dynafit and have given up nothing in downhill performance.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman View Post

How can you agree with someone when you have never used?

FWIW, Trekkers, i.e. these things



are designed to inflict maximum pain and ensure you have a shitty day out.  I have used them once and would prefer to pull my toenails out with pliers than ever use them again.

I have also used Dukes for a couple of years in the mistaken belief I needed a beefy binding for the downhill. Uphill they are a PITA, being heavy and having a pivot point 2cm below your toes.

It took six years of stupidity and wasted money before I finally went to Dynafit and have given up nothing in downhill performance.
I can agree because the OP does not plan to tour much so I feel the best option is to get a downhill binding that works best for the majority of his use. Get what works best for what he will do most, and make do on the few tours he does. If Trekkers are truly torture then skip the Trekkers and get a Guardian. I have used Tyria Adrenalines and now Guardians, and they are fine, but heavy. Not great for long tours and the weight and stack height (at least of the Adrenalines) are a pain as a downhill binding. I still use these on my alpine skis as I go out of bounds sometimes, but I sometimes wish I just had downhill bindings.

I have Dynafits on my touring setup, and although I love them for touring, I don't want to ski them inbounds much, if at all. I definitely would not recommend them for someone skiing most of the time in bounds. They have little elasticity and are very jarring, and I've released a few times unexpectedly. No doubt that was user error but there is something to be said for clicking into an alpine clamp and knowing you are good to go.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion