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Little Areas That Rock! - Page 4

post #91 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spooky View Post
 

Yea,  I have. Great stuff. Makes me home sick for BC.

Ha.. I am not from there and live and a native New Yorker (NYC) and that video makes me homesick for BC too.  Jordan makes some amazing videos.. He inspires me and has sent me a few good comments from time to time. A solid guy and look forward to one day meeting him. 

post #92 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Its been a tuff time for all these resorts. Hopefully it will be a good snow year in the pnw. Back in the day the lodge had a Shakespearen theme and produce some good racers.

Yes, we hope so too for this area.. Last year was rough there. 

post #93 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralba View Post

 

 

Our family has yet to make it out West. We hope to this year. 

 

Out of curiosity, if you do make it out west, would you go for smaller mom/pop type places or the big resorts seeing as it would be your first time? Lots of good choices for both...

post #94 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

 

Out of curiosity, if you do make it out west, would you go for smaller mom/pop type places or the big resorts seeing as it would be your first time? Lots of good choices for both...

Good question.. Some of our friends were talking about a place called Silverton - don't know much about it at all and they say it's off the beaten path. I have been to Breck in the past. I was thinking of checking out Eldora since I like the drive and have friends that live near there from NYC. We prefer the less commercialized places but, if the skiing is good, we for sure will give anything a try. Any place you would suggest? 

post #95 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralba View Post
 

Good question.. Some of our friends were talking about a place called Silverton - don't know much about it at all and they say it's off the beaten path. I have been to Breck in the past. I was thinking of checking out Eldora since I like the drive and have friends that live near there from NYC. We prefer the less commercialized places but, if the skiing is good, we for sure will give anything a try. Any place you would suggest? 

Yes on Silverton! If you like that sort of thing it's incredible and really an experience unique to North America. If you are taking the family ralba the Durango/Silverton/Telluride trip would be perfect. There is also heli drops at Silverton, a cat opp out of Silverton and Purgatory, and a heli op in Telluride. Silverton might not be a spot for the whole fam, it depends on ability. There is no easy skiing there! If you hit it right this combo trip is seriously the jam. Forget the Summit I70 corridor if the San Juans are going off imo. The San Juans are some of the most beautiful mountains in the lower 48 and there aren't crowds like the other Colorado resorts. The towns are classic Colorado mountain mining towns with huge 13 and 14 thousand foot peaks surrounding them.

 

Durango isn't so dramatic but it's a very cool town and Purg is a great family skiing mountain. This might be the year for that area.  

 

Ouray, a town in between Silverton and Telluride is often called the Switzerland of America. The have a huge hot springs complex. It would be a nice stop after a day or two at Silverton before going around to Telluride. 

post #96 of 126

Required reading for anyone who is considering Silverton but has never been there:

http://www.epicski.com/t/27621/silverton

If you live at sea level don't even think about skiing SiIverton until you have spent close to a week sleeping at 8,000+ feet.  60% of Silverton's clientele lives in Colorado.  And you should have extensive experience in steep terrain and variable ungroomed snow.  I post these caveats because ralba lives in NYC.

post #97 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralba View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

 

Out of curiosity, if you do make it out west, would you go for smaller mom/pop type places or the big resorts seeing as it would be your first time? Lots of good choices for both...

Good question.. Some of our friends were talking about a place called Silverton - don't know much about it at all and they say it's off the beaten path. I have been to Breck in the past. I was thinking of checking out Eldora since I like the drive and have friends that live near there from NYC. We prefer the less commercialized places but, if the skiing is good, we for sure will give anything a try. Any place you would suggest? 

 

Seeing your videos in the past I was thinking you were looking for a family style resort with lost of long cruisers. Please correct me if I am wrong about that? Definitely NOT what you would find at Silverton. I was thinking of something in the middle of mom/pop and huge resort. Maybe Grand Targhee or Snowbasin?

post #98 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

Required reading for anyone who is considering Silverton but has never been there:

http://www.epicski.com/t/27621/silverton

If you live at sea level don't even think about skiing SiIverton until you have spent close to a week sleeping at 8,000+ feet.  60% of Silverton's clientele lives in Colorado.  And you should have extensive experience in steep terrain and variable ungroomed snow.  I post these caveats because ralba lives in NYC.

True for sure but they do have groups that are slower paced and for the less experienced. I have watched ralba's vids and I don't think that Silverton is over his head, the elevation might hurt a little but if he is in a slow paced group I know he would do just fine. That's why I suggested the trifecta of Purg/Silverton/T-Ride. ralba and his buds or just himself can go get a day in at Silverton while the fam hangs back at Purg. After a couple or three days at Purg then pack up and head off the Telluride with a mid drive stop at the Ouray hot springs. For a first time out west out of NYC I think this would be a super sick family trip. 

post #99 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Not at all small, but just learned about Castle Mountain between Banff and Lake Louise in another thread.  Definitely seems to be "under the radar" given how much people ask about LL/Sunshine.  Castle is the only ski resort with on hill lodging options that I've seen that includes winter camping (no power hookup) on their website, along with hostel and hotel rooms, and condos/houses.  Run by locals who saved the place from closure a while back.

 

Castle Mountain reminds me of Powder Mountain . . . shorter season because it's all natural snow . . . very few people.  But a lot more vertical than PowMow.

 

^^^The right mountain, but the wrong location. There is a Castle Mountain between Banff and Lake Louise but it is not the one that you ski at. The Castle Mountain ski area (once called West Castle) is about 2.5 hours south of Calgary and 2 hours east and south of Fernie. This is a serious mountain and should be on every serious skier's bucket list.

 

Here is my TR from 2013:

 

On my way to the Big Sky Gathering, I stopped at Castle Mountain in southern Alberta for the first time, about 2.5 hours from Calgary and 4 hours from Whitefish.

 

While there I had a long conversation with the snow plow operator who is one of an association of 130 skiers who own Castle Mountain Resort. He mentioned several times during our conversation “don’t tell anyone about this place”. So in order to read the rest of this TR you must swear an oath to not ski or tell anyone about Castle Mountain.

 

Castle is a serious skier’s mountain, with 4 fixed grip chairlifts and a t-bar that sometimes runs. One chair is for beginners, one is for intermediates and the other two chairs are a lower mountain triple and an upper mountain double chair that offer some blue runs and a lot of black and double black runs. Both chairs cover approx. 1400 vertical feet each. Getting off the top chair puts you on a long skiway in either direction. It is somewhat similar to Snowbird in this regard but there is no back side Mineral Basin equivalent, just a long skiway and a matter of picking the bowl or chute to drop into and then back to the top lift or all the way to the bottom. If you take the skiway to the skier’s right of the chair it eventually takes you to “The Chutes” for 2500’ to 2800’ (black and double black) continuous vertical runs to the bottom onto a fast skiway back to the lifts.

 

There are over 3000 acres and just 90k skier visits per season, with most skiers showing up from Calgary on weekends and very, very empty on weekdays. According to the parking lot plow man, Castle is about 20k skier visits short of breaking even each year but most of the owners association don’t care because the money that they receive for providing water and sewer to the houses, cabins, townhomes and year round RVs, makes up the resort’s operating shortfall. Some of these homes may or may not be available for nightly/weekly rental and there is a hostel at Castle and one pub, one daylodge/cafeteria.

 

When I arrived at 5pm on a Sunday it was snowing hard with 8-10” in the parking lot. It snowed for a few more hours and the next day the overnight snow report was only a few inches, but close to a foot in the past 24hrs. It turned out that the upper chair had broke down on Sunday, but was working by Monday with boot top everywhere up top and ankle deep on the lower Mountain. Not a lot of upper mountain trees and normally a lot of wind, but no wind on Monday and Tuesday. Wednesday was very windy with the upper chair not running due to wind. A local that I talked to said it was an above average year for keeping the lift open with less than a half dozen wind closures for the season.

 

 

Mount Haig 85k .jpg file

 

It should come as no surprise to learn that the nearest town, Pincher Creek, is the windmill capital of Canada and the farthest thing from a ski town you are ever likely to encounter. It is about 20-30 minutes from Castle and has a Best Western Motel.

Temperature fluctuations can sometimes be a problem, but high winds are the real negative. On those days when the upper chair is not running, it is only a two hour drive to Fernie for an alternate ski day.

 

With very little on hill overnight accommodation, Castle is a good choice for the RVer Skier. $15 to park overnight, $25 with a 15 amp plug in. Washhouse with showers and coin laundry is open 24 hrs.

 

I really enjoyed Castle and it is a good bet that I will be returning there on my way to future EpicSki Gatherings.

 

 

Top of the lower chair 143k .jpg file

 

 

 

Uper chair 112k .jpg file

 

 

I skied Castle again in 2014. This time I showed up the day after a 3 week brutal cold snap had just ended. Monday morning with 20-25cm (8"-10") overnight there were all of about 20 people waiting in line first thing in the morning. It continued snowing all week with almost no one there.

 

This place can be crazy for wind and often times the wind gives the place a refresh overnight without any new snow falling. The locals talk enthusiastically about "skiing the wind sift". The wind causes rock spines to be completely exposed and then you get to ski knee deep wind sift 2 or 3 feet away from completely exposed rock. It can also mean that there are rocks or stumps lurking just beneath the surface.

 

If you are an American and skiing Whitefish and you have a passport then Fernie and most certainly Castle should also be skied. I like to tell people, "Castle is the greatest mountain in North America that you have never heard of.", but the locals and owners don't want you to know this.

post #100 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by UllrIsLord View Post
 

I just love Ski Cooper in Colorado. There's not a whole lot there to challenge you and the lifts are painstakingly slow, but the people are seriously cool, the setting is plain gorgeous, the snow is great and there are some really fun slopes up there. Also, There's a lot of history. It's the same hill where the 10th Mt. Division soldiers from Camp Hale trained during WWII, and there's still some memorabilia from that era. They have a snow cat operation that looks like it would be a lot of fun on a powder day, but I've never tried it.

 

Also +1 for Sunlight as others have mentioned. I had way more fun there than I expected to.

Ski Cooper is one I wanted to mention as well.  We headed up there with some groupon tickets and I was a little bummed to be honest because we weren't going to one of the  3,000 acre super resorts in the same area.  There were a few inches of fresh powder from the night before, but no crowds.  I had probably one of my most memorable times skiing there ever.  It was just so much fun and everyone in our group could ski together even at different skill levels.  It is a great place to go on a powder day because it lasts longer due to less people skiing.  The runs are pretty long and it was just really nice cruising.  On the "back side" I was surprised as it was almost like skiing a bowl.  It was again a super long run and it was a huge snow field to dip around and choose your own adventure.  We are planning on moving back to Colorado and I can see myself taking my kids there to learn.  

 

I have also had lots of good experiences at Monarch Mountain.

post #101 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralba View Post
 

Good question.. Some of our friends were talking about a place called Silverton - don't know much about it at all and they say it's off the beaten path. I have been to Breck in the past. I was thinking of checking out Eldora since I like the drive and have friends that live near there from NYC. We prefer the less commercialized places but, if the skiing is good, we for sure will give anything a try. Any place you would suggest? 

 

Most of the smaller resorts in Colorado are pretty awesome places that suck up almost all of my ski days.

 

Wolf is the best place to ski soft snow in the state, and one of the best in the US by the snowfall/skier visit metric. It gets significantly more snow than any other ski area in the state. I (and others) believe it offers the best tree skiing as well- 1000 of the ski areas 1600 acres is off piste with no cut runs.

 

Silverton is unique. The easiest lines are in line with "approachable" double black terrain at other resorts. No grooming. Guided skiing only except for 2 weeks in December and 2-3 weeks in April.

 

Other small/uncommercialized places of note;

 

Sunlight- terrain that skis very similar to Aspen Mountain (Ajax). It has a lot of good, treed steeps and has some of the best terrain of any of the "local" areas. Snowfall is mediocre but the total lack of crowds allows it easy to find soft snow. 

 

Monarch. Good snow. The very high elevation makes most snow that falls here absolute blower. The mountain is short at only 1100 vert, but has good fall line skiing that will get you 800 vert of solid advanced skiing. Great vibe, friendly people. The Mirkwood area is great- the hike limits traffic and that side windloads to see much more snow than the rest of the resort. If has snowed recently, it will be deep steeps over there.

 

Loveland- Vast open bowls. Most of the terrain is mild, but chair 1 dishes up great steep moguls and chair 9 dishes up steeper bowl terrain. If you can ski by braille in an open bowl during a storm, it is epic. If you want actual visual cues, you may not like the place- it has a rep for being windy and cold and scary for people that get skittish in low visibility.

 

Arapahoe Basin- just over the ridge from Loveland. A-Basin is more protected than Loveland. Better terrain, but smaller. The Pali chair is legendary, and deserving of the hype. This is the only ski area in Summit County I regularly ski.

 

Ski Cooper- As others have mentioned, the vibe is unbeatable. If a beginner skier wants to build confidence, this is the place. No advanced terrain and no steeps, but plenty of stuff good enough to be fun. As Ski Cooper trends very much to the beginner, if you ever want to feel like a pro skier, come out on a powder day. I've had several days where the amazed comments from the lift line never stopped- and the untracked snow didn't really go anywhere either.

 

Eldora- I don't know what to think about this one. Has a windy-cold reputation, but terrain not as good as most on this list. It beats ski cooper, probably not much of the rest in the terrain dept. A few times a year, it catches and upslope storm where it gets 36" and Breck gets 3"- and it becomes an over-capacity s*&^show.

 

Powderhorn- Never skied there. Like Sunlight, crowds do not exist. Terrain not as good, but more of it with good trees. I haven't heard many bad things.

 

Purgatory- Tough to talk about this one. Previous management over-developed the base area and mismanaged the ski area, pissing a lot of people off. New manager purchased it during the middle of last season, and it really looks like he will run it more focused on the skier. Good lift infrastructure. LOTS of trails. In my opinion, the place is over groomed and I wish they would let a LOT more bump up. Spring bumps on the front face (lower Hades) are some of the best ever. Unlike most Colorado areas, no bowls and only limited gladed skiing. Plenty of advanced runs, but not a lot of true expert stuff. Right now, this place is mecca for a groomer zoomer, but new management may change the grooming routine.

 

Granby Ranch- Just stay away. One of the few ski areas I can't recommend to anyone. Terrain milder than Ski Cooper. You will see ads begging you to buy a timeshare on every lift tower and every wall in the lodge. Crummy snow. Overdeveloped. Basically all the worst parts of skiing. 

 

I can't really talk intelligently about Howelson Hill and I can't imagine somebody travelling out of state for anything smaller than the above, but there is a lot of really good small skiing here.

post #102 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

Required reading for anyone who is considering Silverton but has never been there:

http://www.epicski.com/t/27621/silverton

If you live at sea level don't even think about skiing SiIverton until you have spent close to a week sleeping at 8,000+ feet.  60% of Silverton's clientele lives in Colorado.  And you should have extensive experience in steep terrain and variable ungroomed snow.  I post these caveats because ralba lives in NYC.

 

Experiences like that thread are why I just don't have any interest in skiing Silverton during guided season. Despite what their website says, the vast number of people I talk to get 4 runs in on a guided day- and the experience is often marching past virgin snow to harvest skied up snow further out. People that get more laps in tend to be totally acclimated, used to charging up a bootpack, and with enough people to fill a group. If you are taking a group full of strangers, you can expect some of your group will be slow hiking, some will be slow skiing, and lots of people will be aggravated by being in groups with both and forced to march at the pace of others past good snow.

 

April unguided is great. There is a ton of terrain right off the lifts, and it is top-shelf. If snow has come down recently, you can find lots of untracked within 5 minutes of the lift. You do need to be VERY careful that you understand where you are, as a lot of innocent looking lines cliff out- I recommend people scout lines using Google Earth before their visits, and searching youtube for the specific named line you are interested in- you will find plenty of video indicating where guides take mortals to avoid cliffing out. 

post #103 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

Experiences like that thread are why I just don't have any interest in skiing Silverton during guided season. Despite what their website says, the vast number of people I talk to get 4 runs in on a guided day- and the experience is often marching past virgin snow to harvest skied up snow further out. People that get more laps in tend to be totally acclimated, used to charging up a bootpack, and with enough people to fill a group. If you are taking a group full of strangers, you can expect some of your group will be slow hiking, some will be slow skiing, and lots of people will be aggravated by being in groups with both and forced to march at the pace of others past good snow.

 

April unguided is great. There is a ton of terrain right off the lifts, and it is top-shelf. If snow has come down recently, you can find lots of untracked within 5 minutes of the lift. You do need to be VERY careful that you understand where you are, as a lot of innocent looking lines cliff out- I recommend people scout lines using Google Earth before their visits, and searching youtube for the specific named line you are interested in- you will find plenty of video indicating where guides take mortals to avoid cliffing out. 

Thanks for the great and valuable information. A Basin is also on my list of places and Loveland too.  So Silverton isn't the place I should bring the family it sounds.. We have done some side-country here and it cliffed out enough that getting back was a pain... 

 

Copper I have been by there too but, sadly in the Spring. The place looks awesome. 

post #104 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

Required reading for anyone who is considering Silverton but has never been there:

http://www.epicski.com/t/27621/silverton

If you live at sea level don't even think about skiing SiIverton until you have spent close to a week sleeping at 8,000+ feet.  60% of Silverton's clientele lives in Colorado.  And you should have extensive experience in steep terrain and variable ungroomed snow.  I post these caveats because ralba lives in NYC.

Thanks Tony.. After reading some more post, looks like we need to spend some time at elevation and it may not be the right place to ski with a family - though I am sure they would be up for an adventure, our ability should be tested out on some perhaps less complicated terrain 1st. We ski plenty of steep stuff in the East and prefer ungroomed here ala Mad River Glen but, that is also very different skiing then say what to expect out West. 

post #105 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

For those who haven't heard of Mount Bohemia in Michigan, here's a good article with pics with the title "U.P. Extreme" as in Upper Peninsula.  It's a long way from anywhere.  As much snowfall as Stowe and about the same acreage, with no snowmaking and no beginner terrain at all.  Adding snow cat terrain for 2015-16.  Didn't know about the $99 season pass.

 

http://www.skinet.com/skiing/articles/extreme

Joey Wallis - a friend of mine won the Warren Miller comp we were both in - Midwest Powder Mecca  - see if you have not seen yet.. 

 

post #106 of 126

Absolutely awesome write up.  We lived in Colorado Springs for only about 2 or 3 years, but we are moving back.  Thanks so much for all of that info.  I have wanted to get out to Wolf.  I always noticed they would get a big snow in October and we would be jones-ing to go and if nothing else it signaled that our favorite time of year was upon us again!  I've done Loveland quite a bit, but I can't wait to try A-Basin.  I've heard alot about it, but you moved it higher on my list.  I would definitely like to get out to get out to Wolf Creek as well.  I will also add Sunlight to my list.  Here's to hoping we can move soon!  Thanks again.

post #107 of 126
Thread Starter 
post #108 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post
 

From page 238, the year 2003.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/15643/little-areas-that-rock


Not sure what you mean by "page 238" since the 2002-03 thread has only 19 posts.  Back then the OP asked for stories about off-the-beaten track places with lift tickets under $30.  This 2015 version is far more fun.

 

These are the posts from the old threads that were news to me.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobP View Post

New Zealand is littered with little ski area oozing character and some fantastic skiing too.

Fox Peak, Broken River, Craigieburn, Dobson, Temple Basin, Cheeseman, My Olympus, Tukino, Maunganui...all great little places with cheap skiing, no crowds, hardcore locals and friendly atmospheres.

Tukino is located on the east side of Mt Ruapehu. It is accessed up an horrific road that can only be accessed by full on 4wd vehicles (Landrovers etc) with chains on all four. Your average SUV or 4wd sedan will fall by the wayside long before you get near the snow.

As Kiwiski has mentioned, Fox Peak has the narrowest and most dangerous road I have ever been on.

[ December 02, 2002, 01:34 AM: Message edited by: TheRockSkier ]

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by powpig View Post

A few years ago I ski'd a little place right outside of Pocatello, ID called Pebble Creek. Was pretty impressed!
Over 2000' vert! Just 650 acres but more than half rated advanced!
Made powder laps in The Glades all morning!
Definitely under $30.
Go check it out!

Lost Trail on the Idaho/Montana border is another good one!
Montana SnoBowl by Missoula has 2600' vert. Would love to hit it with good conditions top to bottom. Not sure this place qualifies, looks like a lift ticket will cost $31 this year.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Skier View Post

Catamount in NY/MA (on the border) ROCKS!

Click Here

$44 on weekends, but meets the $30 limit on weekdays at $29!

[img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
 
post #109 of 126
Thread Starter 

Page 238 of this forum. I doubt there are many places that offer a 30 dollar lift ticket these days. That thread is almost 13 years old! 

post #110 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

Experiences like that thread are why I just don't have any interest in skiing Silverton during guided season. Despite what their website says, the vast number of people I talk to get 4 runs in on a guided day- and the experience is often marching past virgin snow to harvest skied up snow further out. People that get more laps in tend to be totally acclimated, used to charging up a bootpack, and with enough people to fill a group. If you are taking a group full of strangers, you can expect some of your group will be slow hiking, some will be slow skiing, and lots of people will be aggravated by being in groups with both and forced to march at the pace of others past good snow.

 

April unguided is great. There is a ton of terrain right off the lifts, and it is top-shelf. If snow has come down recently, you can find lots of untracked within 5 minutes of the lift. You do need to be VERY careful that you understand where you are, as a lot of innocent looking lines cliff out- I recommend people scout lines using Google Earth before their visits, and searching youtube for the specific named line you are interested in- you will find plenty of video indicating where guides take mortals to avoid cliffing out. 

If it just snowed a lot you are missing out! I have always got 5 or 6 laps. I only go there if a big storm hits them the days prior to Thursday. The days I have been there are DEEP, like waste deep powder skiing on huge terrain. Sure some parts of runs are a little tracked towards the end of the day but so what. I have never left unhappy about the experience. 

post #111 of 126

A friend and I are hitting Salt Lake City Feb 6  and are keen to try out a few areas around Utah,Idaho etc   before meeting up with more friends at Breckenridge on Feb 19

I've done JH ,GT,Snow Basin, Pow Mow ,Alta ,Snowbird, Brighton,Solitude ,Canyons etc on previous trips

I will certainly be trying hard to get back to GT,it was great in Feb this year 

We've got the MCP and Epic passes to do Alta, JH ,Beaver, Vail, Aspen,Breck etc as prt of our road trip and aren't looking for the biggest or absolute best areas all the time

 

We are both advanced skiers,my mate is probably an expert,but we don't do bumps,we don't understand them !! We don't get them at our home field of Turoa NZ

Any suggestions as to where else is worth a look? Sun Valley? Powderhorn? 

post #112 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by rojoke View Post
 

Any suggestions as to where else is worth a look? Sun Valley? Powderhorn? 

Powderhorn (see http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=11239&p=70649 ) and Sunlight (near Glenwood Springs - http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=11240&p=70650 ) both qualify. Sun Valley does not qualify as a little area, but it is on MCP.

 

Two others near Salt Lake City worth checking out are Sundance (beautiful views of Mt. Timpanogos and if other SLC areas are too firm, Sundance will usually softens) and Beaver Mountain (could be hit on way to JHMR). No high speed lifts at either AFAIK.

post #113 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by rojoke View Post
 

A friend and I are hitting Salt Lake City Feb 6  and are keen to try out a few areas around Utah,Idaho etc   before meeting up with more friends at Breckenridge on Feb 19

I've done JH ,GT,Snow Basin, Pow Mow ,Alta ,Snowbird, Brighton,Solitude ,Canyons etc on previous trips

I will certainly be trying hard to get back to GT,it was great in Feb this year 

We've got the MCP and Epic passes to do Alta, JH ,Beaver, Vail, Aspen,Breck etc as prt of our road trip and aren't looking for the biggest or absolute best areas all the time

 

We are both advanced skiers,my mate is probably an expert,but we don't do bumps,we don't understand them !! We don't get them at our home field of Turoa NZ

Any suggestions as to where else is worth a look? Sun Valley? Powderhorn? 

 

 

SUN VALLEY! Best high speed cruising in North America. As long as you are in control and not endangering others, then go as fast as you want and the ski patrol will not bother you. I got this info from a Sun Valley ski instructor that I shared a chair lift ride with.

 

Sun Valley doesn't get tons or snow but has lots of snow making and great grooming, great lift capacity.

 

Also north of SV on the way to Hamilton Montana, right on the Continental Divide is Lost Trail Powder Mountain. I haven't skied it myself but plan to on the way to SV if I can time it correctly as it is one of those small places that is only open 3 or 4 days per week.

post #114 of 126

Found my 2012 trip report that combines an afternoon at Sundance with the following day at Brighton at http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=10133&p=64891

 

I agree with DanoT that Lost Trail qualifies as a little area that rocks, but it is a long way from anywhere else you are going. Report from last day of Feb. 2015 there at http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=11737&p=73667


Edited by tseeb - 10/13/15 at 8:44pm
post #115 of 126

Probably mentioned a few pages/years back (as it can't be "that" unknown), but Fernie rocks!:beercheer:

 

On your way in or out, reserve a seat at Island Lake and stay an extra week!

post #116 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfo1 View Post
 

Probably mentioned a few pages/years back (as it can't be "that" unknown), but Fernie rocks!:beercheer:

 

On your way in or out, reserve a seat at Island Lake and stay an extra week!

 

With 3500' vertical, 142 runs & 5 bowls and 7 chair lifts, Fernie is not exactly little. While there I trust you took the 2 hour trip to Castle Mtn? Now that place really rocks. However, If you stayed in Fernie the whole time, then I know nothing, we never had this conversation, move along. j/k. See my post #99 for more info on Castle.

post #117 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

 

With 3500' vertical, 142 runs & 5 bowls and 7 chair lifts, Fernie is not exactly little. While there I trust you took the 2 hour trip to Castle Mtn? Now that place really rocks. However, If you stayed in Fernie the whole time, then I know nothing, we never had this conversation, move along. j/k. See my post #99 for more info on Castle.


Stayed a few days after a week at Island Lake. Talk about small! Not one lift, anywhere.

post #118 of 126

I was working in Cedar Rapids IA for 18 months back in 2013 and bought a season pass to Sundown in Dubuque.

http://sundownmtn.com/

Unpretentious and the people were all so friendly. 

post #119 of 126

Today we were toodling around Central/Eastern Washington and came across Badger Mountain Ski Area.  It's in the middle of wheat country and the terrain is flat or gently rolling, except for Badger Mountain, which isn't tall, but it's pretty steep for a little hill.  I would rate the main run down as a single black, but I've seen some areas rate things that steep as doubles.  It's maybe 500' of vertical (stress on the maybe) but it knocked me out with the terrain.  I could spend a day here exploring the tight, steep trees and moguls that must form here.  No snow today.  The elevation is about 2500' or so, I imagine.  We just were driving along and saw a sign for it that said it was 4 miles away.  We almost missed it.  Below are some pics.

 

From the entrance that was gated with barbed wire to keep out the cows, I suppose.

 

Looking down the only lift, a T-bar, from the top.  The town in the far distance is Waterville, WA.  Had a great lunch there at the Coyote Pass Cafe, the seafood chowder was the best I can ever remember having, and I'm a chowder head.  The wife's ruben was HUGE.

 

The "warming hut" on top.  A sign says "no fires."

post #120 of 126
I too have eaten lunch at the Coyote in Waterville, indeed un unexpectedly fine dining experience.
I saw the sign for Badger but never ventured the 4 miles.
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