or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Keeping your kids warm this ski season
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Keeping your kids warm this ski season

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I have an 11 year old boy who's feet get awfully cold in the winter time.  My wife and I've have tried double socks on cold days and it still doesn't work.  I wanted to ask everyones advice for ideas.  Has anyone tried the electric socks and if so do they work?  

Anyway, looking for advice.

post #2 of 13

Make sure their boot liners are warm and dry before they ski.  Keep their socks warm and dry and put them on at the mountain (wear separate socks in the car).  One sock is better than two, two can reduce circulation.  Apply Hot Hands or similar chemical warmers above and/or below the feet within the boots.  If all that  fails look into Hotronics warmers and the Boot Glove.  Electric socks help but are expensive and uncomfortable.

post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by hirustler View Post

Make sure their boot liners are warm and dry before they ski.  Keep their socks warm and dry and put them on at the mountain (wear separate socks in the car).  One sock is better than two, two can reduce circulation.  Apply Hot Hands or similar chemical warmers above and/or below the feet within the boots.  If all that  fails look into Hotronics warmers and the Boot Glove.  Electric socks help but are expensive and uncomfortable.

Hotronics are north of $200...

What's jr. wearing on his head and neck?
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 


Helmet.  We picked up a pair of small woman mittens for him in neutral color.  We tried electric mittens last year and they were crap

post #5 of 13

I find that changing socks at lunch time can be helpful.  Even when it's pretty cold, my feet sweat a bit so the socks can be a little damp.  If I don't feel like changing, taking boots off while I'm eating helps too.

 

Wearing a vest to help keep the core warm can help.

post #6 of 13

Do you have or use a boot dryer/boot warmer.  Not a $200 foot warmer, but these are $50-$80 standalone device used before/after skiing.

 

Dryer: These makes sure  the boots get dry, but also warm the boot.

 

Warmer: Run the device first thing in the morning before skiing to warm the boot before you even hit the slopes.  If you need to drive to the resort, get a power inverter and run your warmer in the car.

 

Most devices do both, but some are more dryer oriented/ others are more warmer oriented

 

Recommended stuff to take a look at:

Dryer/Warmers:

Hotronics SnapDry, therm ic refresher are the dryers 1st, and warmers 2nd.  Will dry your boots in say 4hrs.  Start it up again first thing in the morning

 

Warmer/Dryers: e.g. dryguys circulator and clones are the foot shaped things you stick in your boots.  These are warmers first, but also dry by leaving them on overnight.

 

People here also swear by Hot Gear Bag which also accomplishes the same task, but is more expensive.

 

Dry warm boots will not only be obviously warm, but also start the day off more flexible, so fit and circulation stays good and there is no coldness that saps all your warmth and snowball into pain.

post #7 of 13
Keep core & head really warm and more warm blood goes to the extremities. If boots are too tight (or too thick socks) circulation is bad & now cold feet. Sprinkling pepper in the socks will help too...but not so much it crunches when you walk.
post #8 of 13
While Hotronics are expensive they work. I've had the same pair for 10 years and have only had to replace the heating elements when I've moved them to new boots so at $20 a year they are very worth it. However, I agree that not doubling socks and making sure the boots are dry and warm upon start are critical. Baby powder in the boots can help. If you use chemical hand warmers put them on top of the foot as the blood flows closer to the skin and is warmed as it goes out to the toes. As far as the hands, use chemical hand on top and make sure they are dry as well. I recently picked up a bunch from Sierra Trading Post for $.63 each. Watch for their specials to get them that cheap.
post #9 of 13

what kind of socks have been tried?  


Before dropping $200, hopefully you have tried at least a pair of merino wool socks designed for skiing (e.g. smartwool socks, ~$10-$20) and not just using 2pairs of the 10for$6 costco specials.  

post #10 of 13

Light nylon socks are all that's needed. The boot insulates the foot. If you don't let the natural heat from the foot escape to warm the inside of the boot the insulation is worthless. Heavy socks prevent the natural heat from warming the inside of the boot. Try it you might be surprised.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by steamboat1 View Post

Light nylon socks are all that's needed. The boot insulates the foot. If you don't let the natural heat from the foot escape to warm the inside of the boot the insulation is worthless. Heavy socks prevent the natural heat from warming the inside of the boot. Try it you might be surprised.

I'm with you on not needing thick socks because the boot should be providing plenty of insulation. But what you've stated is not how heat works. Letting heat get away from you're feet CANNOT provide better warmth through some warming of the boot. All insulation of any kind does is prevent heat from escaping faster than it otherwise would. Heat will always move from a hotter area to a cooler one ... so it will always move from your foot, through your sock, into the boot, and out into the cold air.

The only way to have a warm boot heat your foot would be to preheat it to warmer than your skin temp - which is what the electronic ones do.

Thick socks could cause poorer circulation which could cause the foot to feel colder. They could also trap more moisture which could do the same.

But other than those things, more insulation will keep in more heat and be warmer.

I'm of the thinking that cold feet are more likely the result of poor circulation due to ill-fitting boots, a cold core, or moisture.

Some people do have naturally poor circulation even with all other measures taken care of, and do still very cold feet.
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 

My son has poor circulation in his feet

post #13 of 13

Found a related thread that might have a few useful suggestions.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/129736/help-w-children-w-cold-hands-and-feet

 

Also, added the tag for "Cold Feet" under Topics Discussed (right hand column).  Click on it for a list of relevant threads.  Forgot that tag existed.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Keeping your kids warm this ski season