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Copper vs Winter Park comparison

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
This is the time of year when our group pulls starts planning our ski trip.

Usually we go to SLC but flight prices out of Buffalo have inched up quite a bit and the timing doesn't seem to work well with the ski and fly same day like we usually do. Last year we went to CO and went to Copper, Snowmass, Highlands, and Loveland. Overall, we thought we liked SLC a lot better, but conditions might have had something to do with it as CO was having some thaw-freeze issues. We thought Copper and Loveland were more fun than Aspen as the trees are too tight in Aspen, and the snow quality was worse. Also Copper has some fun long cruising off the Super Bee chairs which was probably the highlight of the trip, given sub-par snow.

So based on cost/flight limitations we may consider going back to CO. Copper would be high on the list, but Winter Park also looks interesting given it rates high for tree skiing. Also it appears to be a little more budget friendly for lodging. For either resort we'd get a 4 pack to save on $.

Comparing the two, how do the compare in the following:

Cruisers- does WP have some fun long cruisers if we get cursed with snow like last year? By long I'm thinking 2000ft+ vert like the Super Bee chair.

Snow- Copper is higher, so is WP generally inferior for snow mid-winter?

Trees- are the WP trees as good as advertised? How do they stack up against Copper or even Brighton or Snowbird?

Moguls- are the moguls as prevalent at WP as they say? Most of us are on snowboards and moguls aren't that fun.

Crowds- Copper was pretty good on a non-holiday Friday in February... How does WP compare?

Is there anything else of note to compare?
Edited by JoeSchmoe - 9/13/15 at 3:51pm
post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post

This is the time of year when our group pulls starts planning our ski trip.

Usually we go to SLC but flight prices out of Buffalo have inched up quite a bit and the timing doesn't seem to work well with the ski and fly same day like we usually do. Last year we went to CO and went to Copper, Snowmass, Highlands, and Loveland. Overall, we thought we liked SLC a lot better, but conditions might have had something to do with it as CO was having some thaw-freeze issues. We thought Copper and Loveland were more fun than Aspen as the trees are too tight in Aspen, and the snow quality was worse. Also Copper has some fun long cruising off the Super Bee chairs which was probably the highlight of the trip, given sub-par snow.

So based on cost/flight limitations we may consider going back to CO. Copper would be high on the list, but Winter Park also looks interesting given it rates high for tree skiing. Also it appears to be a little more budget friendly for lodging. For either resort we'd get a 4 pack to save on $.

Comparing the two, how do the compare in the following:

Cruisers- does WP have some fun long cruisers if we get cursed with snow like last year? By long I'm thinking 2000ft+ vert like the Super Bee chair.

Snow- Copper is higher, so is WP generally inferior for snow mid-winter?
My vote goes to WP on this YMMV

Trees- are the WP trees as good as advertised? How do they stack up against Copper or even Brighton or Snowbird?
Yes, but I like 'em tight.

Moguls- are the moguls as prevalent at WP as they say? Most of us are on snowboards and moguls aren't that fun.
Yes.

Crowds- Copper was pretty good on a non-holiday Friday in February... How does WP compare?
Copper is the place to be on the weekends.  Both are generally fine weekdays IMO.

Is there anything else of note to compare?
I know lots of boarders who dig WP/MJ but I sure can't figure out why.  Tons of bumps, tons of flat runouts.  I've heard that there's a lack of steep cruisers as well.   Others can confirm or deny.
post #3 of 26
My extremely dated observations,
MJ usually had better snow.
post #4 of 26
Mary Jane has better bumps. MJ/WP has better trees.

Copper has better steeps, cruisers, and high alpine bowls.

Personally, I get bored quickly at WP. I'd much rather ski Copper. YMMV.

Mike
post #5 of 26

Since the OP is from Canada and the Canadian dollar is rapidly dropping in value to the point that a trip to the US costs an additional 30%, my question is: why doesn't the OP's group take a trip to western Canada?

post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

My extremely dated observations,
MJ usually had better snow.

My experience is that if its snowing MJ will get better snow but if it hasnt snowed in a few days then Copper will have better conditions. Im with Mike in that i much prefer Copper so Im a little biased and that probably affects my opinion. Ive never really gotten the whole WP/MJ vibe. The tree skiing is no comparison though......WP is much better.
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
Dano,
Even with poor dollar, my calc's show a trip to the US to be cheaper. If you can give me some advice on how to get shoestring budget deals on the Canadian side, I'd be happy for it. Here's how my numbers shake down:

Flight- a flight west to Canada is low to mid $500's plus baggage fees. Detroit to Denver is low $200's US or maybe $300CN including bags on Southwest.

Tix- a winter Park 4 pack is $179US or about $250CN. Can I ski 4 days on this side for that?

Lodging- there are some inexpensive hotels and condos around WP that can be had for about 100 US per night. How does Canadian lodging compare.

Other- gas, food, beer still seems to be about equal even when you factor in the exchange.
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post

Dano,
Even with poor dollar, my calc's show a trip to the US to be cheaper. If you can give me some advice on how to get shoestring budget deals on the Canadian side, I'd be happy for it. Here's how my numbers shake down:

Flight- a flight west to Canada is low to mid $500's plus baggage fees. Detroit to Denver is low $200's US or maybe $300CN including bags on Southwest.

Tix- a winter Park 4 pack is $179US or about $250CN. Can I ski 4 days on this side for that?

Lodging- there are some inexpensive hotels and condos around WP that can be had for about 100 US per night. How does Canadian lodging compare.

Other- gas, food, beer still seems to be about equal even when you factor in the exchange.

 

You have definitely found some deals, especially flights and lift tickets. Most major US resorts like Aspen, Breckenridge, Jackson Hole, Snowbird etc are over $100US per lift ticket so the WP deal is excellent and I guess it won't be too crowded if you go mid week.

post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post


Cruisers- does WP have some fun long cruisers if we get cursed with snow like last year? By long I'm thinking 2000ft+ vert like the Super Bee chair.

Snow- Copper is higher, so is WP generally inferior for snow mid-winter?

Trees- are the WP trees as good as advertised? How do they stack up against Copper or even Brighton or Snowbird?

Moguls- are the moguls as prevalent at WP as they say? Most of us are on snowboards and moguls aren't that fun.

Crowds- Copper was pretty good on a non-holiday Friday in February... How does WP compare?

Is there anything else of note to compare?

 

Cruisers - WP is meh.  A few decent ones, but not long continuous fall line stuff.  Rather broken up and segmented.  Nothing too challenging, but there are a few if you seek them.

 

Snow - Haven't been there enough to compare, but WP was fine, particularly compared to Ontario snow

 

Trees - WP was a blast.  Something for everyone.  Even got my wife and kids lapping Pioneer chair in Vasquez.  Was practically empty and untouched lines in there.

 

Moguls - WP/MJ......ENDLESS.  You want bumps, it's nirvana there.  If you don't want bumps, then most of that entire mountainside is off limits

 

Crowds - no clue.  We went mid-week, non holiday time.  All of Colorado was pretty much empty.

 

Other - WP has flat areas which are brutal for snowboarders.  Quite a few areas, actually.  

 

Other more - WP is very segmented in terms of skiing areas and abilities.  They're fairly self-contained.  If you don't like bumps, then MJ is out.  If you don't like tight trees then Eagle Wind is out.  If you're not into beginner stuff, then 2/3 of WP side is out.  Cirque is good for advanced/expert but runs are not accessible; you do one run and then it's a slog to get up Eagle Wind, down and across, then back up to Parsenn, then across back to the Cirque.  Frankly, it's very user un-friendly.

 

What does this mean?  We had fun at WP, bu it is not awesome for snowboarders, and tends to break up groups, leaving a few areas to do, and you end up doing much of the same.  By contrast, our experience at Steamboat and limited time at Copper was you could go pretty much anywhere; there was something for everyone off most chairs.  The mountains weren't as segmented, and flat traverses weren't really a problem.

 

On the upside, Winter Park is inexpensive and has a small town for some semblance of night life/apres.  Copper has......condos. 

 

 

 

Side note: flights from Ontario to Western Canada are indeed brutal, in terms of pricing.  Like, stupid expensive. Even with the crappy exchange rates, flying out of Buffalo or Detroit is way cheaper, especially for a family of 4, for example.  Once in Alberta/BC, it's accessible and somewhat reasonable pricing for the most part, but we found flights to be prohibitive.  Canada has some of the best skiing anywhere (and gorgeous scenery and friendly people), yet flights continue to kill it for us.  And when we booked, CDN $$ was within 5%, it was a no-brainer.  Even now, it's still better in the States.  Even here in the East, I'm looking at Placid/Whiteface rather than Tremblant for this coming season.  I love Canada, but holy crap it's just not smart money compared to most US resorts.

 

Oh the other hand: to our American neighbours, with your awesome $$ exchange rate, come to Canada for your ski trip!  We're already getting the snow! Thumbs Up

post #10 of 26

Good advice above... a few thoughts I'll add:

 

One catch on the four packs you might not have noticed:  you can buy a WP four pack online but you can only renew a Copper four pack online.  The first time you buy a Copper four pack you need to be here in Colorado, then you can renew your Copper four packs online in subsequent years.

 

It's really hard to beat the long cruisers at Copper off the Super Bee, almost anywhere.  The runs are great and it's an 8 min ride for 2300 vertical feet on a six pack that rarely see lines.

 

Neither WP or Copper will be crowed on weekdays.  As the Denver masses head up on weekends, Copper will be much less crowded than WP with no lines 99% of the time on the expert lifts, but some lines on the more popular lifts.   

 

On lodging: note that the Town of Winter Park and the Winter Park ski area some distance apart (10 mins by bus).   I'd think lodging at WP ski area and Copper village should be similar in cost.   Staying in the Town of Winter Park is really comparable to staying in Frisco and skiing Copper.  All are good options, but if it fits your budget I much prefer staying ski-in-ski-out, as the experience is so much nicer.  I think one of the great things about Copper and WP is their overall lower cost allows folks to pay a bit more for lodging so they can stay where they can walk to the lifts.

 

On snow: Mary Jane has better snow than Copper, but Copper has similar snow to Winter Park in my experience.   It all depends on the year, though, as some years WP/MJ does better than Copper, and some the other way around.  

 

@JoeSchmoe  when are you thinking about coming?   That can change things a bit too.

post #11 of 26

Cruisers- Way better at Copper. The whole front side, outside of the Kokomo area, is perfect for the groomer zoomer crowd. 

 

Snow- 350" at WP, 280" at Copper, plus you get upslope potential at WP.  Copper will ski better a week after a storm. WP will also have alot more wind and closures in the alpine.

 

Trees- All of WP has great trees. Don't sleep on the WP side, Vasquez ridge, lower Cirque. Great stuff. Copper trees are pretty sub par IMHO.

 

Moguls- WP moguls can get huge. If you like that stuff, go to WP. Moguls just mean too many people have already skied your line. :)

 

Crowds- Copper much better.

post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 
Okay, i think ive been talked out of winter park and I didn't realize Copper 4-packs were a no go now. I did see though keystone / AB have 4 packs now. I remember liking keystone for both cruising and trees plus I've never been to AB, but really want to go. I'm going to see what the group thinks.
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

Good advice above... a few thoughts I'll add:

 

One catch on the four packs you might not have noticed:  you can buy a WP four pack online but you can only renew a Copper four pack online.  The first time you buy a Copper four pack you need to be here in Colorado, then you can renew your Copper four packs online in subsequent years.

 

 

 

And as much as I love Copper this is another one of those things I just don't understand.  I guess they have their reason but if you go for the season pass it does not have to be in person.  Not sure why they won't allow someone from out of the area to send a photo and waiver for the 4 pack and just go by guest services when they get there.

 

Are you purchasing a NEW Season Pass?
If so, we will need a photo of you and a signed 2015/2016 Liability Waiver, which can be completed ONLINE
If we have both the photo and a signed waiver prior to 9/20/2015, your season pass will be mailed to you on 9/21/2015.  If received after this date, you will need to stop by Copper Mountain Guest Services to pick up your pass.

post #14 of 26

Winter Park is my home mountain.  I really love it, but if you are a snowboarder and out for a once a year trip I would go to Copper.  WP has quiet a few flat areas.  They are all manageable once you know about them but can cause irritation. 

post #15 of 26
Copper is the place to go if you want more than bumps and groomers. Great tree runs, even off the "beginner lift," American Eagle. Coppers back bowls are amazing. And above tree line on the front side houses some fun cliff drops and steeps in the Union Meadows and Enchanted Forest areas. Plus there's Woodward copper if you are a park fan. MJ has fun trees, but the rest of the mountain gets old quick...
post #16 of 26
If you are on a tighter budget and want something different, look into some four packs for both Loveland and A-Basin. If I was basing my expectations on the groomed stuff off Super Bee just as a baseline (meaning, you want at least some long groomers no matter the new snow luck or not), I think both Loveland and A-Basin would make for fun and different days. That is super accessible if you stay in Keystone as a-Basin is 7 miles up Loveland Pass and Loveland another 7 miles over the pass.

A-Basin and Loveland deliver very different high alpine experiences, and Keystone would provide that "base" terrain mix. Plus, if this settles in as a classic El Niño with Front Range impact, Loveland is on the east side of the Front Range and A-Basin sits right on the other side. Rolling the dice for a big storm cycle, the more you go west from the continental divide, the more you move away from the potential bullseye. Assuming you are coming in Feb again, that's when the dry Jan cycle starts to swing towards bigger spring storms, and at least some of those are likely to be coming out of the southwest hitting the Front Range, which also strands many day trippers because Denver gets hammered unlike typical storms out of the northwest where it is dry in the urban corridor while snowing in ski country.

Hitting storm cycles on a preplanned trip is a statistically low probability thing, but if you are coming to CO, I'd stay as close to the Divide as possible. WP is good there, except the benchiness of the terrain, and you aren't close to other stuff for micro-climate chasing. I'd sell 'em on Keystone-AB and take a bet on Loveland in terms of maximum potential of a really memorable trip.
post #17 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

If you are on a tighter budget and want something different, look into some four packs for both Loveland and A-Basin. If I was basing my expectations on the groomed stuff off Super Bee just as a baseline (meaning, you want at least some long groomers no matter the new snow luck or not), I think both Loveland and A-Basin would make for fun and different days. That is super accessible if you stay in Keystone as a-Basin is 7 miles up Loveland Pass and Loveland another 7 miles over the pass.

A-Basin and Loveland deliver very different high alpine experiences, and Keystone would provide that "base" terrain mix. Plus, if this settles in as a classic El Niño with Front Range impact, Loveland is on the east side of the Front Range and A-Basin sits right on the other side. Rolling the dice for a big storm cycle, the more you go west from the continental divide, the more you move away from the potential bullseye. Assuming you are coming in Feb again, that's when the dry Jan cycle starts to swing towards bigger spring storms, and at least some of those are likely to be coming out of the southwest hitting the Front Range, which also strands many day trippers because Denver gets hammered unlike typical storms out of the northwest where it is dry in the urban corridor while snowing in ski country.

Hitting storm cycles on a preplanned trip is a statistically low probability thing, but if you are coming to CO, I'd stay as close to the Divide as possible. WP is good there, except the benchiness of the terrain, and you aren't close to other stuff for micro-climate chasing. I'd sell 'em on Keystone-AB and take a bet on Loveland in terms of maximum potential of a really memorable trip.

 

We went to Loveland using the 4-packs last year.  We liked it for sure, and would go back, but we only do 4-day trips and have settled on the Keystone / A-Basin 4-packs.  

 

You're right about the snow at Loveland being different.  There were traces of snow everywhere on the ride in back from Glenwood Springs where we based ourselves for skiing Aspen.  At the peak of Loveland, the snow seemed to be more intense.  I'd say they had close to 3-4" on average with more in areas favoured by wind (less in other areas though).  I assumed it could have been snowing worse further west at that time too, but your bullseye explanation seems to be about right.

post #18 of 26

It's true that you have to go in person to buy the Four Packs at Copper, but you can still beat the mountain's pricing if you buy your lodging/lift tickets together. Copper runs specials on Lodging/Lift Tickets through their hotels, but if you go the Condo/VRBO route like my group, just find a rental through one of their approved partners and you can get special lift ticket pricing- I got a quote for this season at 4 Days for $280 from one of the condo companies, which I still thought was a great price. Also, they throw in their line-skipping 'Secret Pass' for free that lets you jump to the front of the lift lines when you book through the lodging companies:

 

http://www.coppercolorado.com/summer/plan_and_buy/lodging/cmlodgingpartners.html

 

FWIW- I have been to Copper, Winter Park, Steamboat, Keystone, Loveland and A Basin, and I personally liked Copper the best. They're all great, to be fair, but for me the back bowls and the terrain under the Super Bee lift put Copper above the rest. We went on New Years week, and still never waited in a line on Super Bee. The longest lines were on Timberline Express- even longer than the main lifts at the base.

post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylewegman1 View Post
 

It's true that you have to go in person to buy the Four Packs at Copper, but you can still beat the mountain's pricing if you buy your lodging/lift tickets together. Copper runs specials on Lodging/Lift Tickets through their hotels, but if you go the Condo/VRBO route like my group, just find a rental through one of their approved partners and you can get special lift ticket pricing- I got a quote for this season at 4 Days for $280 from one of the condo companies, which I still thought was a great price. Also, they throw in their line-skipping 'Secret Pass' for free that lets you jump to the front of the lift lines when you book through the lodging companies:

 

http://www.coppercolorado.com/summer/plan_and_buy/lodging/cmlodgingpartners.html

 

FWIW- I have been to Copper, Winter Park, Steamboat, Keystone, Loveland and A Basin, and I personally liked Copper the best. They're all great, to be fair, but for me the back bowls and the terrain under the Super Bee lift put Copper above the rest. We went on New Years week, and still never waited in a line on Super Bee. The longest lines were on Timberline Express- even longer than the main lifts at the base.

 

We did the trip a few weeks back.  We stayed in a great condo in the Keystone Village, and skied there 3 days, with 1 at A-Basin.  Keystone was fun, but skis smaller than its stated acreage.  We were seriously underwhelmed by A-Basin. The slow lifts and layout just didn't do it for us.  The stuff off Pali was a little too steep for us, given how bad we were sucking wind from the altitude.  Zuma was too mellow, unless you wanted to traverse a long ways for some relatively short shots.  We did get 9" that day, and had some Epic runs though... it just got old fast...maybe if we had a guide we'd have liked it more.  

 

I've now hit 9 resorts in Colorado and will concur that Copper is the favourite.  The altitude got us all over the 4 days with no one quite sleeping well.  I think there's a big difference in sleeping once you get over 9000ft.  My wife and I sleep at 8000ft in the summer and had zero issues. 

 

All that said Utah>>>Colorado.  After two years of CO, I REALLY miss Snowbird and Brighton... from a skiing / snowboarding / altitude perspective, there's really no comparison.  Unless the Canadian dollar goes completely in the toilet, I know where we're going next year.

post #20 of 26
FYI. New budget airline flying out of Smaller airports. One of the routes is Hamilton to Kelowna 300RT. No clue in baggage fees.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post
 

 

We did the trip a few weeks back.  We stayed in a great condo in the Keystone Village, and skied there 3 days, with 1 at A-Basin.  Keystone was fun, but skis smaller than its stated acreage.  We were seriously underwhelmed by A-Basin. The slow lifts and layout just didn't do it for us.  The stuff off Pali was a little too steep for us, given how bad we were sucking wind from the altitude.  Zuma was too mellow, unless you wanted to traverse a long ways for some relatively short shots.  We did get 9" that day, and had some Epic runs though... it just got old fast...maybe if we had a guide we'd have liked it more.  

 

I've now hit 9 resorts in Colorado and will concur that Copper is the favourite.  The altitude got us all over the 4 days with no one quite sleeping well.  I think there's a big difference in sleeping once you get over 9000ft.  My wife and I sleep at 8000ft in the summer and had zero issues. 

 

All that said Utah>>>Colorado.  After two years of CO, I REALLY miss Snowbird and Brighton... from a skiing / snowboarding / altitude perspective, there's really no comparison.  Unless the Canadian dollar goes completely in the toilet, I know where we're going next year.


Cool! We did a trip to Keystone with the same agenda last season. I agree Keystone stats are highly inflated- I would guess that, of their stated "3,000" acres, close to 1,000 are only accessible by Snowcat/hike. I also was annoyed by the VERY slow lifts at A Basin (especially the ones from mid-mountain to peak) and some pretty long lines at the base/Montezuma lifts, but the atmosphere was definitely unique and we had fun challenging ourselves on Pali. I personally had a blast in Montezuma Bowl and played around over there almost the whole day.

 

Back to the point of this thread- Looking at a late March trip with myself and a few snowboarders, we're debating between WP and Copper. I of course vote Copper but the current pricing looks like it will end up costing us a bit more....

 

I'm a skier travelling with snowboarders, and I've never boarded before. Do you guys think some snowboarders from the south that only get out to CO once a year will still enjoy 3 days at Winter Park? They don't like bumps or catwalks (obviously) but I can't speak for how annoying that gets to snowboarders. I don't mind using my poles a bit. If they'll still have fun, we'll go the cheaper route and do WP, but debating about whether the extra money is worth it for Copper. My thought is that they're used to riding on a 60 acre hill with 250 ft of vertical, so WP will still feel like Disneyland to them.

post #22 of 26
^^^You just need to know where the long flats are, probably staying of Pioneer entirely.

I've come completely to the other view on these "slow" lifts accessing high alpine terrain. That's how they stay open in storms and wind, and I love open terrain high alpine skiing. WP has no fixed grip upper mountain system except for Eagle Wind that you can't access easily without a detachable, and so the upper mountain is constantly closed. Loveland is the same as A-Basin - if almost your entire mountain is above treeline, then you have to design for wind.

Copper has it best I think - they are fixed where they need to be and detachable getting there, but that's just terrain and unfortunately WP needs to move way more people around Parsenn, so it gets a mix of closed and too many skiers except on quiet days where the entire upper mountain can have perfect snow, a fast lift, and as many laps as you want.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

^^^You just need to know where the long flats are, probably staying of Pioneer entirely.

I've come completely to the other view on these "slow" lifts accessing high alpine terrain. That's how they stay open in storms and wind, and I love open terrain high alpine skiing. WP has no fixed grip upper mountain system except for Eagle Wind that you can't access easily without a detachable, and so the upper mountain is constantly closed. Loveland is the same as A-Basin - if almost your entire mountain is above treeline, then you have to design for wind.

Copper has it best I think - they are fixed where they need to be and detachable getting there, but that's just terrain and unfortunately WP needs to move way more people around Parsenn, so it gets a mix of closed and too many skiers except on quiet days where the entire upper mountain can have perfect snow, a fast lift, and as many laps as you want.

 

Don't you realize that on a windy day a chairlift can be run at a slower speed regardless of whether it is fixed grip or high speed detachable? Gondolas because of the bulk of the cabins can be a greater problem on windy days. At places with chronic high winds such as Whitehorn 1 at Lake Louise they have a surface platter lift.

 

What fixed grip, slow running chairs really do is preserve powder lines by delivering less skiers per hour so it takes longer to ski the area off, but you get less runs per hour as well.

post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

^^^You just need to know where the long flats are, probably staying of Pioneer entirely.

I've come completely to the other view on these "slow" lifts accessing high alpine terrain. That's how they stay open in storms and wind, and I love open terrain high alpine skiing. WP has no fixed grip upper mountain system except for Eagle Wind that you can't access easily without a detachable, and so the upper mountain is constantly closed. Loveland is the same as A-Basin - if almost your entire mountain is above treeline, then you have to design for wind.

Copper has it best I think - they are fixed where they need to be and detachable getting there, but that's just terrain and unfortunately WP needs to move way more people around Parsenn, so it gets a mix of closed and too many skiers except on quiet days where the entire upper mountain can have perfect snow, a fast lift, and as many laps as you want.

I've been to Loveland and found most of the slow lifts to be on high angles so the overall ride time is quick. Zuma and the two upper mountain lifts at A-Basin are very long and don't cover much vert per foot travelled. The end result is crazy slow ride times.
post #25 of 26
@JoeSchmoe
One bit of perspective on flight pricing.

DTW to SLC is only served by delta. It is a hub to hub route which generally has monopoly pricing.

There are 5 airlines flying DEN-DTW, including frontier and southwest. The presence of frontier will generally keep fares more competitive
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
There's now some directs out of YYZ that have come down to realistic levels. Thats looking like plan A right now. I saw some for $350US. Hopefully the dollar recovers at least partially.
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