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Ski camp/ racing camp or 3 day private lesson? - Page 3

post #61 of 80

All good ideas but it would be really good if you at least took one lesson so someone could actually look at your skiing, take some video and at least get you started in the right direction. You can do drills until the cows come home but without seeing you ski or watching your video, everything is speculation. 


Edited by skier31 - 9/16/15 at 2:33pm
post #62 of 80

I agree with skier31.

 

Instructional videos and books are great.  But there's a reason to have an instructor work with you.  Most of us don't actually know what we are doing half the time.  We can't feel it.  An instructional book or video will show you what you should be doing, but it can't show you what you are actually doing when you try to follow its instructions.  You may think you're succeeding when you're way off.  I speak from experience, both from the video watcher-book reader's side of the issue, and the instructor's perspective.

 

Our best way to know what we are doing is to have an instructor tell us, show us, and/or video us and explain what's actually going on.  Then tell us how to alter it for better results, and then tell us if we are succeeding or not.

 

Instructors know how "blind" we can be to our own bodies.  We've seen people planting their poles only on one side, right pole followed by right pole followed by right pole, while thinking they are alternating them.  It's an innocent mistake, but isn't that odd?   We see people thinking they are not dropping their inside hands/shoulders, when they are doing it very consistently.  People do all kinds of things that they don't know they are doing, and don't do things that they think they are doing.  This lack of feeling what our bodies are doing is natural -- until we develop very intense proprioceptive skills relevant to our goals.  That development takes years of concentration.  

 

An instructor with a good eye who can effectively let you know what you need to know is a great short-cut to learning.  


Edited by LiquidFeet - 9/17/15 at 9:28am
post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

I agree with skier31.

 

Instructional videos and books are great.  But there's a reason to have an instructor work with you.  Most of us don't actually know what we are doing half the time.  We can't feel it.  An instructional book or video will show you what you should be doing, but it can't show you what you are actually doing when you try to follow its instructions.  You may think you're succeeding when you're way off.  I speak from experience, both from the video watcher's and book reader's side of the issue, and the instructor's perspective.

 

Our best way to know what we are doing is to have an instructor tell us, show us, and/or video us and explain what's actually going on.  Then tell us how to alter it for better results.

 

Instructors know how "blind" we can be to our own bodies.  We've seen people planting their poles only on one side, right pole followed by right pole followed by right pole, while thinking they are alternating them.  It's an innocent mistake, but isn't that odd?   We see people thinking they are not dropping their inside hands/shoulders, when they are doing it very consistently.  People do all kinds of things that they don't know they are doing, and don't do things that they think they are doing.  This lack of feeling what our bodies are doing is natural -- until we develop very intense proprioceptive skills relevant to our goals.  That development takes years of concentration.  

 

An instructor with a good eye who can effectively let you know what you need to know is a great short-cut to learning.  

 

No kidding!  I was in a class with a lady who after being videotaped, swore it was not her when we watched her part of the video.

post #64 of 80

Yeah... I'm especially fond of the right hand right hand right hand poling thing.  I've had that happen with a client at least twice.

post #65 of 80
Going from expert to intermediate in one video.
post #66 of 80
Thread Starter 

I still plan on taking a lesson for sure. I just want to get feedback on what to work on and a video of course would be great. I am not one of those guys that thinks just because I am going fast , I am an good skier. I know I need to work on a few items.

post #67 of 80
Our young athletes regularly train on EASY terrain with boots fully unbuckled. Personally, I prefer to have then unbuckle the cuff for flex, but still keep the lower foot snugly in place for "feel".

PS, by unbuckled people generally mean that the boots are buckled at the loosest possible setting rather than having buckles and straps flapping around. This is dangerous.

YES this is a good drill primarily aimed at flexing and closing the ankle.
post #68 of 80

I used to inline skate in an indoor parking garage on weekends when it was closed to cars. It had long smooth wide open concrete slopes to carve turns on. At the bottom of the ground floor slope there is a big office mirror coated window that faced directly up the slope. You could watch yourself carve turns all the way from the top. Instantaneous and accurate real-time feedback like this could be an invaluable learning accelerate for skiing but, perhaps, not as feasible. Maybe in an indoor ski arena.  A video shot by a skier skiing directly behind subject with a live feed to a tablet held by the filmed skier could be possible. I'm sure it has been tried by somebody, somewhere ...

post #69 of 80

one more thing about the stiff boots. make sure you put the strap NOT over the plastic, but just over the liner. that will make them more progressive. and don't over-tighten the buckles. that is creating problems usually. it's much better if the boots give you a progressive feel: if the boot is easy to initiate forward and then gets hard is perfect... if it's just a stiff thing you hit as you want to get forward, that may throw you back.

post #70 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat View Post

Our young athletes regularly train on EASY terrain with boots fully unbuckled. Personally, I prefer to have then unbuckle the cuff for flex, but still keep the lower foot snugly in place for "feel".

PS, by unbuckled people generally mean that the boots are buckled at the loosest possible setting rather than having buckles and straps flapping around. This is dangerous.

YES this is a good drill primarily aimed at flexing and closing the ankle.


Wait.  I thought "unbuckled" meant unbuckled.  When I've done this drill I unbuckled the buckles.  The booster strap was done up as usual.

Really, all this time everyone means "buckled loosely" when they say "unbuckled?"

post #71 of 80
When I did this drill it was completely unbuckle all 4 and booster straps weren't a thing yet. When I buy boots I generally want the"normal" setting to be on the loosest notch, to allow for stretching or whatever, so buckling to the loosest setting wouldn't even be a drill. It would just be skiing.

Sometimes.i still do this drill on accident when I forget that I haven't yet done up my buckles and I just go. I worry about what's become of my ability until I look down and realize what I've done.
post #72 of 80
Thread Starter 

I find it does help but I wouldn't do it at speed or on a moderate run- where I am having most of my issues. I think having a trained professional ski with me for a day is the best option. 

 

D

post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat View Post

Our young athletes regularly train on EASY terrain with boots fully unbuckled. Personally, I prefer to have then unbuckle the cuff for flex, but still keep the lower foot snugly in place for "feel".

PS, by unbuckled people generally mean that the boots are buckled at the loosest possible setting rather than having buckles and straps flapping around. This is dangerous.

YES this is a good drill primarily aimed at flexing and closing the ankle.


Wait.  I thought "unbuckled" meant unbuckled.  When I've done this drill I unbuckled the buckles.  The booster strap was done up as usual.

Really, all this time everyone means "buckled loosely" when they say "unbuckled?"

 

My unbuckled means the bail is on but the lever (wing) is up. It keeps the buckle from being twisted. The power strap must be secured so the leg is connected to the spine of the boot. If the strap is not secured, there is a good chance to fall out of your boot. :eek

post #74 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

My unbuckled means the bail is on but the lever (wing) is up. It keeps the buckle from being twisted. The power strap must be secured so the leg is connected to the spine of the boot. If the strap is not secured, there is a good chance to fall out of your boot. :eek

yeah - that.

 

now, if you're doing this in a GS course hip to ice, perhaps take them off completely or tape them. i like my knees the way they are :)

 

@yogaman mentioned some ski like this: 

 

but we still have the lateral stiffness 

post #75 of 80

My ankles hurt just watching that clip. :D

 

I am not on groomers much and when I am usually the toe buckle goes down to keep it from snagging.

My take is whatever keep folks happy is OK with me.   

post #76 of 80
My set ups are soft boots soft skis soft snow. Stiff boots stiff skis stiff snow.
post #77 of 80
Thread Starter 
Finally on snow. Anyone have a recommendation for an instructor in colorado ? Keystone , beaver creek or vail
post #78 of 80
Stiff boots are most likely not the main problem, imho. My first run of the day is with no buckles latched and no strap, and in a Head 130...I weigh 155. This doesn't feel like a soft boot at all, it feels like you are skiing in tennis shoes, which requires balance. Btw, 130 lb.women standing 5'7 ski SL in 170's in the WC. Think of your foot as a prosthetic, make the movement's to balance else where.
(Edit: this requires that you are on a flat ski to begin with)
Edited by Tip Ripply - 11/29/15 at 8:02pm
post #79 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tip Ripply View Post

Stiff boots are most likely not the main problem, imho. My first run of the day is with no buckles latched and no strap, and in a Head 130...I weigh 155. This doesn't feel like a soft boot at all, it feels like you are skiing in tennis shoes, which requires balance. Btw, 130 lb.women standing 5'7 ski SL in 170's in the WC. Think of your foot as a prosthetic, make the movement's to balance else where.
(Edit: this requires that you are on a flat ski to begin with)

umm, maybe the soccer world cup???:rolleyes certainly not any ski world cup.......  Particularly since the largest race slalom skis are 165/166 for men.  the WC women are normally on the 157/158. There may be a few amazons on the 165 but most certainly not at 130#...

post #80 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

umm, maybe the soccer world cup???rolleyes.gif  certainly not any ski world cup.......  Particularly since the largest race slalom skis are 165/166 for men.  the WC women are normally on the 157/158. There may be a few amazons on the 165 but most certainly not at 130#...
UMM, boot flex.
Edit to say to Mr. Eye Roller above that the key word was IN, not on.
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