or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Value Daily Ski for East Coast?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Value Daily Ski for East Coast?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Me: 6 feet, 170 lb, male, average build but in decent shape

 

Skiing habits: intermediate skier, probably 85-90% on groomed terrain, I just started figuring out some easier mogul trails and more open glades at the end of last season. If it is groomed I feel comfortable on just about any trail I have come across in the East. I do not have the luxury of chasing powder, even living in central VT; digging out from more than 6+ inches of snow is the downside of being local. I would like to improve on bumps, and in trees, and have really enjoyed several 3-4'' early morning snowfalls.

 

Current ski: Rossignoal Exp 83, 176cm, probably 2013 model year, purchased as a used demo with very limited wear. Overall I like the ski compared to rentals I have used, but it does feel a bit long, or at least not as quick as I would want in moguls, trees, and for shorter radius turns (but that may be me more than the ski).

 

I am looking for a daily ski--I can only afford one pair at a time--that will cover the usual East Coast hard groomed stuff I ski most often, but would be complementary, fun, and helpful in the trees and in something like 4-6'' of snow. That may be asking a lot, and even more so my budget is going to be under $700.

 

Any suggestions for a good East Coast daily ski at a good value price?

post #2 of 20

I just picked up the P802 from RMU. It's designed to be an East Coast one ski quiver. You can order the flat ski from Alpine Shop here in Burlington for $500, and pick up an inexpensive binding like the Look PX12 to come in under $700. 

post #3 of 20

Will defer to those who have skied 2016 models for current, but you'll save $ if you buy last year's models new in the next month. Now, the problem: Something that's good in 4-6" of snow and is also grippy on eastern hardpack and good in eastern bumps is already a problem, moreso if you found the E83 to be unwieldy (it's generally considered a very forgiving ski). 

 

I'd suggest the following: 

 

1) The longish feel of your ski in trees is probably more about technique than gear. It's a good length for you, and a moderate flex. Trees are not easy. A few lessons might go a long ways toward making you like it more in tight terrain. 

 

2) If you're still set on a new ski, you might consider something like the 2015 Head REV80, or the Salomon X-Drive 8.0, or the K2 AMP Rictor 82. These all do a decent job of daily driving east cost conditions, all should be available for a price that will allow you to come in under $700 with binding. If you have a few more Yuan to spend, the Blizzard Latigo or Kastle LX82 might be your tickets. 

 

3) Alternatively, you might consider keeping your Rossi's for softer snow and dropping down to a real carver (67-72 mm) for firm days. 

post #4 of 20

Actually the Rossi E83 should be a decent ski for what you describe.  Not sure its worth looking for a similar ski hoping that it will magically change things.  Beyond's suggestion to add a narrower carver for the firm groomers does make some sense.  But I suspect a few lessons and lots of hours on the slopes is what will help the most. 

post #5 of 20

Have you considered moving into a wider ski with a much more significant rocker profile?  Staying on a ski like the Experience 83 won't help you progress too rapidly in bumps, trees, etc.  If you were going to stay in the Rossi world, I would say look at the Sin 7.  It might seem unnecessarily wide, but if you already feel comfortable on groomed terrain and are really looking to improve your ability off-piste, I think a ski like the Sin 7 could be the ticket.  

 

The Blizzard Latigo was mentioned as an option as well, but for that 4-6" of fresh snow I don't think it's going to give you the stability you need.  I would at least look at the Blizzard Bushwacker (the next width up in the line) or even the Blizzard Kabookie.  

 

I would be leery of getting another ski in the 80-90mm under foot category.  The Experience 83, as mentioned above, is a good ski for you on paper.  I would be nervous you'd feel the same way on anything else in that category.  That being said, sometimes moving from an 83mm waist ski to something much wider can be a little bit overwhelming for some.  Before you pull the trigger I might suggest waiting until the season starts and trying to get on a couple demos.

post #6 of 20

I might echo SkiEssentials.  I'm not sure another ski in the high 70's mid 80's is going to get you what you want.  If fresh(ish) and trees are on your to-do list, you want a different type of ski -- wider and one with rocker.  I myself have two east-coast skis: one, a hard-snow 78-wide carver and the other a soft-snow 95-wide ski.  I've taken both to the mountain on some days and even switched -- carver for hard-pack groomers in the morning and wider/softer ski for chopped and softened crud in the afternoon.  Or... reversed this order for powder days.  


I'd suggest demo-ing a different type of ski and keeping the Rossi for your groomer days. 

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 

I am not shocked at all that technique is going to get me further than a new pair of skis. My Dad learned to ski on widths in the 60s and lengths above 210, so obviously a lot has to do with ability before the ski comes into question.

 

Part of what I was hoping to find out is if there was much of a performance difference in those skis listed as All Mountain Front or Mixed Snow East. They are all in the 88-90 range and at least seem build for a bit more off the groomed stuff skiing, while still holding strong in the hard stuff.

 

Potentially getting something used again in the future, could have brought one of those skis into my price range.

 

What I hear in the various post indicating however is that moving from an 80-84mm to an 88-90 ski is not going to bring that great of a difference in bumps and trees. Am I correct there?

 

I appreciate all the input. Folks on EpicSki have been extremely forthcoming and helpful talking about gear, lessons, and resorts when I have had questions. Very grateful for the community input.

post #8 of 20

I agree with everyone else that your current ski is a good length and width. 

 

You aren't going to see much of a difference between an 80-84mm ski vs. an 88-90mm ski.

post #9 of 20

I think you are generally right in your conclusion.  I might note, however, that it's about more than waist width.  Some skis are built to hold an edge and carve and others are more ready to skid/slarve/pivot, which is what you will want as you begin to work with un-groomed and trees.  These categories tend to align with width, but not absolutely.  A Kastle MX88 will hold a lot more resolutely than Rev80.  But....width aside, I think we are concerned about your best interests.  Are you willing to give up some edge hold on hard snow?  If so, you could go a bit wider and softer and more rockered as some of the other posters have suggested.  But if you go too far this direction, you might feel you lost out zooming on the groomers.  Carving and edge hold tend to be opposed to some of the characteristics that will serve you well in the trees -- especially at the introductory level.  

 

That's why a couple of us have suggested buying a completely different ski and not hoping you can really do it all with only one.

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimH View Post
 

Actually the Rossi E83 should be a decent ski for what you describe.  Not sure its worth looking for a similar ski hoping that it will magically change things.  Beyond's suggestion to add a narrower carver for the firm groomers does make some sense.  But I suspect a few lessons and lots of hours on the slopes is what will help the most. 

 

 

^^^ This is just about spot on.  For what you describe, and where you're planning to ski, the Rossi E83 is towards the top of the list of skis I would recommend, and 176 is the right length.  Anything else would just involve swapping out one ski for another in the same category. 

post #11 of 20
My daily driver for EC if going to be the Salomon Q85 this season. I don't always want to be charging on the Labs.

I think it's quite underrated as a tool: flat tail, just stiff enough & sweet shape. Carve or close down the radius.


Also avail for ~$250 in last years colors.


*full disclose I've got a hookup via @ExoticSkis test crew ; but who are we kidding I ski what I want.
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 

So what would be an option that is a bit wider, softer, with more rocker, that gives up some grip on hard snow but not a ton?

 

Any suggestions on a tree/bump/minor powder ski I might be able to find super cheap at ski swap?

 

Plans sounds probably best to continue with what I have and invest in days on the hill and lessons. But, I would like to be informed and be able to keep my eyes open for a deal if I found one.

post #13 of 20

What you're stating sounds a lot like me 7-8 years ago when I was still buying bargain boots.  Did you buy your current boots from someone who knows how to fit ski boots?  I wasted an

unbelievable amount of money trying to buy improvement with skis when what I really needed was boots that fit my feet.  Getting boots that fit properly improved my skiing a lot, the very first day.

post #14 of 20

I can't comment on the E83, not having skied that particular ski, but I have skied the K2 AMP Rictor, and if you do want to swap it out for a similar ski, that would be a good one for you to try.  It is a really easy-going ski with lots of forgiveness and easy to ski.  It won't hold a hard and fast turn line like some other on-piste orientated skis, but that's it's only real downside.

post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 

I do have boots that feel good--snug. Technical Mach 1 90s. I got them on sale, but I basically tried on every boot the store had, and these fit the snuggest. I have not had any noticeable movement in the boots.

 

I did not purchase them at a speciality shop, and so I also have not had any custom work done to try and dial them in any further than the basic fit and buckle adjustments.

 

My wife switched from $50 used rental boots, to new boots around the same time I purchased mine, and she noticed the biggest difference the first run she took in them.

 

Boots are obviously key---check large bolded article at the top of the Gear Discussion thread.

post #16 of 20

Those boots sound pretty soft in flex for your weight but could be fine if they fit correctly.  I'm guessing you aren't putting too much force on the tongues anyway which is probably most of the problem.  If you turn your skis by leaning back and twisting, you'll be able to turn them on groomers but when you have new snow, bumps, etc.  that won't work anymore.  You'll NEED to pressure the tips, link turns, keep speed up etc. to make them turn.  The backseat twisting thing is a hard habit to break and will take a lot of concerted effort on your part but the results are worth it and the journey is fun.

 

Back to boots...have you done a shell fit?

post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 

I can't say how much force I am putting on the tongues. I try to ski with shins in constant contact with the tongue--mentally picturing trying to keep a quarter pinned between me and the boot. Read that as a helpful tip somewhere.

 

Considering I am not sure what a shell fit is, I am not sure.

 

When I tried on boots I tried them on with and without the liners. Implemented the finger spacing method behind the heel noted several places about trying on boots. I am not expert so a lot of that in the past was trying to apply what I had read about as I could, when I could afford budget gear.

 

Skiing isn't cheap, so I try and shave pennies and dollars where I seemingly can. Hiking the same mountains during the summer is a heck of a lot cheaper!

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralVT08 View Post
 

So what would be an option that is a bit wider, softer, with more rocker, that gives up some grip on hard snow but not a ton?

 

Any suggestions on a tree/bump/minor powder ski I might be able to find super cheap at ski swap?

 

Plans sounds probably best to continue with what I have and invest in days on the hill and lessons. But, I would like to be informed and be able to keep my eyes open for a deal if I found one.

 

I would consider the Salomon Q-98, Blizzard Kabookie, and Rossignol Sin 7.  They're all sitting right in the 98mm under foot category, so won't give up a ton of edge hold on firm snow (with some variation between the three skis).  This category has a lot of skis with metal in the construction, but these three options do not, which I think is important for you considering where you are in your progression.  A ski with metal would hinder your progression in moguls, trees, and powder as you'll be working much harder to manipulate a heavier ski.

 

The Sin 7 is historically hard to find at a big discount, but you should have some luck finding a Kabookie or Q-98.  (For example: http://www.skiessentials.com/skis/men-s-skis/men-s-freeride-skis/2015-salomon-q-98-skis-w-axial3-120-bindings.html)

 

You are correct in saying moving from a ~84mm waist to a ~90mm waist is not going provide a significant difference in the skis ability in softer snow and variable terrain. 

post #19 of 20

Sorry for the assumption.  Sounds like you are on your way. 

 

It seems to me that a ski like the Bushwacker would be a great candidate.  You could ski a 173 or 180.  You should be able to find a new pair for under $400.  Add some pivot 12's and you have a great setup for $100 less than you were looking to spend.

post #20 of 20
I am not sure why the updated Atomic Vantage series for 2016 should not be in the mix. The Vantage 95 and 105 have no metal and the 90 CTI and 100CTI are a bit stiffer, but do it all. I will be skiing the 90 CTI at Sugarbush this season, but would have opted for the 100 CTI if I did not already have a wider ski for the softer days.

The Atomics do not get a lot of love here at Epic, but the entire line is perfect for VT, and the price is right.. Good luck choosing.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Value Daily Ski for East Coast?