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Looking for a supplier - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I usually have an "October prep regimen", that involves sharpening and hot scraping, possibly (if needed) some wax remover and structure renewal, then more waxing up to the point of deciding what wax I am going to need for the first week of skiing for each ski. Down to only 2.5 pairs though (the .5 is semi-retired depending on the shape of the hill on day one. Might not be a day 2 for them if things are okay.) Last year I had four pair, so things took longer. Now that I am simplifying I might not start to late in the month.

 

 

:D  I've still 9 pair to go :D

post #32 of 55

heli 002.JPG

 

Yellow and Red Slidewright waxes - work for me and I pass everyone on downhill schussing and go bye them suprisingly fast on roads etc. Don't race anymore but stuff really works.

post #33 of 55

That purple Race Base Medium that you have in the back was a go-to of mine for quite a long time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
 

heli 002.JPG

 

Yellow and Red Slidewright waxes - work for me and I pass everyone on downhill schussing and go bye them suprisingly fast on roads etc. Don't race anymore but stuff really works.

post #34 of 55

Thanks. That's too bad. I wonder why they discontinued that product. 

post #35 of 55

I switched to Hertel Super Hot Sauce last season after years of using Swix waxes. I really liked how it performed, and I loved how easy it was to scrape off after hot waxing. What I didn't like was the significant drop-off in performance when it's really cold -- my skis would barely move on the flats when it was 0 degrees F. or colder. I still have some Swix CH4 for when it's that cold.

post #36 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldMember View Post
 

 

I usually wax every Friday evening during the season. We have a tuning room in our condo with two benches that is the gathering spot for the guys in the building on Friday nights. Most of the guys use different waxes for the conditions and are very particular but are also with racing backgrounds, some racing in the Master's program at Schweitzer. That's fine; I get it. For me, I don't race and am happy with Hertel. No real thinking about what's going to be the best application for any given day. I'm generally the fastest guy on the cat track back to lunch on Saturdays and that's good enough for me. :D

 

If I were racing and that much more particular, I'd probably use Podium wax from some buddies in Sandpoint. https://www.podiumwax.com/ I've used it occasionally and liked it but, it's a race wax and holds for about a half day. If you wanted to use it on a regular basis, it takes daily waxing to really perform. Too much work and thought... 

Sounds familiar!  I also ski at Schweitzer and have a condo.  I have a tuning room/ski room in the garage and many gather around on Friday evenings for some wax and beers.  I have been using bulk wax from racewax.com - as well samples from PURL and Zoom.  I don't race - all are fine what we need.  Let's hope for more snow this year!

post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post


That said, I still feel the need to use the Base Renew wax from time to time to get the deep soft wax penetration one needs in a good sintered base.  Hard wax needs something under it to adhere too.   No matter what you hear it's like this.  All hard wax only leads to base burn as it only stays at the surface and once it wears off you burn!

I have waxed and hot box preped. skis for folks who did actually not like the extra speed they had. Some folks like a "speed controlled" ski. From my extensive experience I can say most all of these folks are just average skiers who just don't ski aggressively at all.

I think this explains some observations I made last year. When using Renew as the base prep, I did not get base burn like earlier in my waxing experience and the wax job seemed to last longer. I get it from Race Place. I still use the standard all-temp wax from Race Wax on top as I still have quite a bit of it. No complaints, but I probably will try Zoom once I finish up my current supply.

I was concerned about the speed factor you mentioned as well, but found the skis were easier to control when waxed. I'm still an average skier, but once I got used to the speed, it was a win-win!


See, now you are "getting it"  Base Renew is awesome.  Soft wax because of smaller molecule size always goes deeper into the base even if there is some harder wax still in (or on) the ski base.

And absolutely a well waxed ski will rotate easier.  Zoom is the bomb!

post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post

I've been waiting on waxing and tuning work to get our skis stone ground to correct for concavity that developed last winter. Does this develop with humidity and temperature cycling? I thought it best to wait until the fall sets in and things cool off a little. Did get the itch over the summer to do some prep work on my son's twin-tips which still are flat. biggrin.gif

I've been storing our skis in a small dehumidified workshop room in my basement where I set up the tuning/waxing bench. Due to size constraints, I created one from a 12"x5' board I can mount on my miter saw table. Works pretty well as a multi-purpose tool.


Small concave portion is no big deal as long as both skis are relatively equal.  Not only will grinding take away from the skis lifespan, but much work is needed after a grind to bring the ski up to potential speed.

 

Think about that before you spend your money that way.

 

I will say it again.  All this must be perfectly flat stuff is pure poppycock!

post #39 of 55

I'm not a racer or a wax nerd, but all-temp Purl or Hertl has worked fine for me. You can usually find lb bricks on ebay or amazon for $20-30. I also go with grocery story paraffin (about $3 for a lb) for hot scrapes, cause I'm cheap like that.  

post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post


Small concave portion is no big deal as long as both skis are relatively equal.  Not only will grinding take away from the skis lifespan, but much work is needed after a grind to bring the ski up to potential speed.

Think about that before you spend your money that way.

I will say it again.  All this must be perfectly flat stuff is pure poppycock!

Yes, I was wondering how much work would be needed to clean out the structure in the base after stone grinds. I've read it takes more wax and scrape cycles than a recreational skier like myself will tolerate. Your thoughts?

The nuisance factor of scraping wax is increased by concavity IMO. They scraped down a lot faster when these skis were new and flat. Yes, I used a true bar.
post #41 of 55
I just use the end of the scraper which is narrower. Not worrying about mild concavity.
post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post
 
Yes, I was wondering how much work would be needed to clean out the structure in the base after stone grinds. I've read it takes more wax and scrape cycles than a recreational skier like myself will tolerate. Your thoughts?

 

Cleaning is easy.    Flattening the sharp structure tops is hard.    That's been one of Jacques'  arguments for using a steel scraper for a long time now.    

It's a pretty solid argument, imo, with the notice that rec skiers need to develop a touch for a scraper that could easily leave gouges. 

post #43 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Cleaning is easy.    Flattening the sharp structure tops is hard.    That's been one of Jacques'  arguments for using a steel scraper for a long time now.

It's a pretty solid argument, imo, with the notice that rec skiers need to develop a touch for a scraper that could easily leave gouges. 

Ah, that makes sense, thanks for the info! I thought I had read that the threads that pull out of the p-tex base during grinding have to worked off to get them to detach.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I just use the end of the scraper which is narrower. Not worrying about mild concavity.

Yes, I do the same, but perhaps worry too much about gouging the base.
post #44 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Cleaning is easy.    Flattening the sharp structure tops is hard.    That's been one of Jacques'  arguments for using a steel scraper for a long time now.

It's a pretty solid argument, imo, with the notice that rec skiers need to develop a touch for a scraper that could easily leave gouges. 
 I thought I had read that the threads that pull out of the p-tex base during grinding have to worked off to get them to detach.
 

 

That's Fibertex' job.    Made much, much easier and faster if one loads the 6x9 pad into a sheet sander. 

post #45 of 55
"Small concave portion is no big deal as long as both skis are relatively equal."

WTF?! It's a huge deal! Especially if you're on hard or packed snow!
post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbtbakkes View Post


WTF?! It's a huge deal! Especially if you're on hard or packed snow!

 

Not really- on snow like that you are expected to be on edge, the concave part is off the snow entirely.   
 

post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I just use the end of the scraper which is narrower. Not worrying about mild concavity.

Yes, I do the same, but perhaps worry too much about gouging the base.

 

Not much worries, unless you use a steel scraper like Jacque. The plastic scraper is much softer then the sintered ptex base.   

post #48 of 55

Also, FWIW, always be mindful of how much you're flexing your scraper when you scrape.  Keep your thumbs to the outer edges of your scraper, not in the middle, or you can concave the base before it ever hits the snow.

post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Not really- on snow like that you are expected to be on edge, the concave part is off the snow entirely.   

 
Then don't let them run flat
post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post


Small concave portion is no big deal as long as both skis are relatively equal.  Not only will grinding take away from the skis lifespan, but much work is needed after a grind to bring the ski up to potential speed.

Think about that before you spend your money that way.

I will say it again.  All this must be perfectly flat stuff is pure poppycock!

Yes, I was wondering how much work would be needed to clean out the structure in the base after stone grinds. I've read it takes more wax and scrape cycles than a recreational skier like myself will tolerate. Your thoughts?

The nuisance factor of scraping wax is increased by concavity IMO. They scraped down a lot faster when these skis were new and flat. Yes, I used a true bar.


 Lot's of work post.  Steel scrape, Fiber pad, sequence of brushing, wax and keep doing it besides the steel scrape.  Wax holds down the hairs.  Then good brushing brings them back up.  I look at the ski with bright light.  Looking across the base.  If after brushing I see micro hairs I do it again until I can't see anymore after brushing.

 

The ski should be flat on the outer thirds, or relatively so.  Small concave parts are mot that hard to clean out after scraping with plastic dish scrubbers and then brush.

 

Sure, if it's that bad then grind if you want, but you can't grind away a deep pocket.    Good luck.

post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post
 
Yes, I was wondering how much work would be needed to clean out the structure in the base after stone grinds. I've read it takes more wax and scrape cycles than a recreational skier like myself will tolerate. Your thoughts?

 

Cleaning is easy.    Flattening the sharp structure tops is hard.    That's been one of Jacques'  arguments for using a steel scraper for a long time now.    

It's a pretty solid argument, imo, with the notice that rec skiers need to develop a touch for a scraper that could easily leave gouges. 


It does take some practice.  Main thing is if the scraper hits a burr on the base edge you must stop and work on that and maybe the bevel a bit with a stone,  One must pay good attention to the metal edge where it meets the plastic!

post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbtbakkes View Post

"Small concave portion is no big deal as long as both skis are relatively equal."

WTF?! It's a huge deal! Especially if you're on hard or packed snow!

 

Hmmm............never bothered me.  The base shape has a lot to do with how a ski handles.  Want easy "playful" or super quick engagement?  I ski all conditions.

post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I just use the end of the scraper which is narrower. Not worrying about mild concavity.

Yes, I do the same, but perhaps worry too much about gouging the base.

 

Not much worries, unless you use a steel scraper like Jacque. The plastic scraper is much softer then the sintered ptex base.   


I don't clean out a low spot with steel.  That's a plastic job for sure.

post #54 of 55

Hertel is ok unless it's cold -15C and lower.

 

Toko universal bulk LF pink from artechski is 10$/250g and works great on anything. the black one is good base wax and cold wax as well.

post #55 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

OP is in Colorado.    A company local to him http://www.purlwax.com/Snowboard_Wax.html    makes really good CH waxes, that perform better in CO snow than Hertel, better than CH6 and CH7.       I'd either go with Dominator or the local guy, with the understanding that Dominator may require some experimentation on his part. 

(I am speaking as someone who has about 11 lbs of Hertel Hot Sauce, FC739 both old pre-2010 formula and new formula, and Spring Solution in a drawer.   It really mostly gets used on ski swap skis these days.   It makes bases super glossy, fo' sho'  biggrin.gif )

PS Now that China has cornered the world moly and tungsten markets it will be interesting to see how anti-friction additives change.  

A big second for Purl
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