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What is it, at the root, that makes someone like one ski vs another? And do the "gear reviews" have it right? - Page 3

post #61 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattT View Post
 

For me at the root of it what makes me choose one ski versus another is how good of skier it makes me look like on the chairlift. A ski needs to make people who don't know much about skiing wonder to them self "that guys probably sponsored. I wish I looked as cool as him"

 

I've got a couple of lift cred anecdotes.  One was my first time at Alta where the guy I hopped on a lift with was eyeing my skis and we talked a bit about them and I asked him about his Las Lenas trip having spotted the sticker on his skis.  By the top he was taking me a tour of a few stashes of great windblown that I'd never have found by just regular poking around.

 

Other one was a patroller at Squaw tipping me off as to a lift opening and a particular line that was skiing well, unsolicited.  I asked him how he knew I wasn't just a holiday gaper and he pointed at my well trashed Factions and said "Gapers don't have skis like that". Just goes to show you can fool some of the people some of the time....


Edited by fatbob - 9/9/15 at 2:47am
post #62 of 77


1. Does a "skier" vs "one who skis" (no matter how frequently or infrequently) like a certain brand or type of ski? Do manufacturers cater the person who "skis" rather than skiers?

 

For me the answer is yes and no.  I have certain go-to brands but if they don't have what I am looking for I look elsewhere.

 

 

2. How important is what we read on forums, in magazines, or see on tv (or even from our peer group) to our personal decision making? (I know I get into the "herd" mentality myself.)

 

Magazines and forums are useful to narrow down choices.  My first fat skis were a pair of Solomon Pocket Rockets.  Loved them!  I was on the fence about buying them based on some negative reviews (probably mostly here on Epicski), but one day I was skiing at Jay Peak and saw a patroller exiting the woods with a huge grin on his face.  On his feet were strapped a pair of Sollie Pocket Rockets.  That's when I decided to buy.  

 

 

3. Are people honest with themselves and their gear consultant on how and what they ski? For example, I skied 30 some odd days last year. VERY few of the runs I did were off-trail (even on trips I took) vs on groomers. Yet, I skied (the majority of time) on 95mm waisted skis. Also, I have noted MANY people over-estimate their ability to staff who is really trying to help them choose a good product for THEMSELVES.

 

I agree that a lot of people overstate their abilities.  Personally, I like a light and playful ski that is easy to turn and forgiving.  Though I consider myself to be an expert I often buy skis rated advanced because I like 'em a bit soft. I think that "skiers" mostly know what they like and are more likely to do the research and find a ski that fits their style while "one who skis" is more likely to be swayed by the testers and by the salesman's recommendations. 

 

post #63 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

 

I think people are clueless about their actual ability and many think they ski better than they do, women included. 

Example: 

I will openly admit that I elevated my ability at the time when I first joined EpicSki and I've written about it in a few places here. 

I thought that I was an advanced skier because I kept up with the guys I was skiing with.  It wasn't until I started taking lessons and slowed things down a bit that I realized that I was a struggling intermediate at best.  

Now I state my ability as "lower advance female skier"  The thing is, I know now what I don't know.  I need to know more.   I ski with women from time to time who are in the same boat that I was in 10 years ago. 

 

My point:  few people know what their skill level is, really.   Men and women can both be clueless.

 

I have to admit... At the end of last season, a friend filmed me and boy oh boy! Whar I saw was so different that how it feel when I ski! Beurk! I'm still in shock! :eek

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattT View Post
 

For me at the root of it what makes me choose one ski versus another is how good of skier it makes me look like on the chairlift. A ski needs to make people who don't know much about skiing wonder to them self "that guys probably sponsored. I wish I looked as cool as him"

:)

 

One thing I realized trying all those skis ( I'm a demo day addict...) is that it is important to try the skis in the conditions you're planning to use them but also in about the same degre of difficulty... I realized that 2 years ago after buying a pair of skis that I really liked when I tried them on a small hill nearby... Completly different story when I brought them on a bigger mountain...:(

post #64 of 77
Thread Starter 
I don't think I overstate my ability. Admittedly, I'm pretty crappy compared to many people I've skied with.

That said, I know what I like and what works for me....

Oh yeah, I can tell is a person is good or not at skiing before they even go down hill by watching them do things like putting boots on, walking with skis, skating, poling, and resting with their skis on.

Conversely, I can immediately spot a gaper.
post #65 of 77

So how would you state your abilities?  Feel free to use any measurement you wish.  

post #66 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post
 

So how would you state your abilities?  Feel free to use any measurement you wish.  

I have skied with Jed, we actually ski pretty similar but he is more on the power side of the scale than myself. He is a solid skier and is pretty good at discerning the differences in ability and gear selection. I do disagree with his lunch selections...mustard on turkey...yuck. 

post #67 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post
 

So how would you state your abilities?  Feel free to use any measurement you wish.  


I've had the benefit of being able to ski with both of my primary "gear consultants" so they know how I ski.


If you don't, video helps. Nowadays, ANYONE that can use this site can upload video to provide feedback. 

 

If you can't pull that off, an honest assessment is available from any ski instructor at any ski area. 

 

If you can't pull THAT off, then one can honestly assess themselves by where they ski, and how they ski.


Of course, the reality of this....is that we will still have people over/understating their abilities. :)

post #68 of 77

You come off as very judgmental of others and impressed with your own ability and I was wondering if you were willing to put it out there as to what level of a skier you are.

post #69 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I have skied with Jed, we actually ski pretty similar but he is more on the power side of the scale than myself. He is a solid skier and is pretty good at discerning the differences in ability and gear selection. I do disagree with his lunch selections...mustard on turkey...yuck. 

 

I am the best skier on the mountain.


And my sandwiches are the best around. Phil's just a hater.

post #70 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post
 

You come off as very judgmental of others and impressed with your own ability and I was wondering if you were willing to put it out there as to what level of a skier you are.


I think you nailed it. I'm super judgmental and I am pretty impressed with my own abilities.

 

I'm probably a level 8 or so skier based on a range from someone who's first time on snow (Level 1) and a world cup ski racer (Level 10).

 

If we're talking recreational skiers only, I'm probably a 9.

post #71 of 77

Thanks for stepping up and to be fair I will too.  If a Big Mountain film star is a 10 then I am an 8 and the gaps between 8 to 9 and 9 to 10 are huge.  On PSIA scale a solid 9.  

 

Just struck a nerve for me about skiing.  Ever since skiing exploded seems there is so much evaluating judging going on in skiing.  You hear the comments in the liftline or on the chair going up-folks skis, boots, clothing are all open for evaluation and then for placing them someplace in a ranking.  For me skiing is about fun and finding challenges to meet.  That is the most important thing to share and where i find myself in the mountains.  So that is why my responses have been a bit jaded.

post #72 of 77

The only times in my experience that I had to think about an ability estimate was when I as an inexperienced ski shopper had to go shopping for skis, when I requested a lesson, and when I had to fill out some form for ski patrol. 

 

I did notice though, some few decades ago, that if I identified myself as "expert" when demonstrating for potential purchase or just renting skis, the ski shop people were more likely to offer me skis that I liked.

 

Speaking of experience, there in lies one of the roots as to what makes someone like one ski vs another, that and what you intend to do with the ski.

 

On my first ski shopping trip, my experience consisted of having skied on very long WWII surplus skis that my dad found on sale at the Sally Ann.  I did not know much about skis, only that the skis I had been on were a big trade-off between high-speed stability and maneuverability.  As I knew that I liked to ski fast, but was a relative newcomer to the sport, the salesman set me up with a pair of 180 cm GS skis (I weighed about a buck ten), they might even have been junior gs skis.  They had fiberglass!  They felt so smooth compared to the old long wooden skis.  I enjoyed that smooth fibre-glass feeling.  They were not stable at high speeds, even the relatively low high speeds I was able to reach on my local 700' hill.  I did not enjoy the feeling that they might rattle off my boots at some inopportune time.  Maybe it was poor technique.  I, being stubborn and not financially well off, made do, although I did enjoy renting the latest greatest every now and then. 

 

Many years later I could afford a top-level ski, and decided to buy a pair.  Since I was still a speed daemon, and my experience included skiing too fast on unstable skis I narrowed down my search using magazine reviews for those skis that were stable at speed.  I demoed many skis and settled on the Kastle SGs.  I did enjoy the quickness of the Dynastar SLs,  but they were not stable at speed.  The Dynastar GS of the day (chicken hearts) were better, but not better enough and they didn't have the quickness of the SL to compensate.   I wasn't impressed enough by the Rossis (7S 4S K ?  VAS damping - liked the Dynastar SLs better).  Fischer RC4 GS came close in terms of stability, but not close enough.

 

Many years later, shopping for shaped skis.  Tried out a whole bunch.  Had enough experience to like both the heavy solid felling of the Atomic SX11 and the quick as thought and lightness of the Solomon Equipe 10 Pilots.   Ended up with something in between.


Edited by Ghost - 9/9/15 at 12:18pm
post #73 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post
 

Thanks for stepping up and to be fair I will too.  If a Big Mountain film star is a 10 then I am an 8 and the gaps between 8 to 9 and 9 to 10 are huge.  On PSIA scale a solid 9.  

 

Just struck a nerve for me about skiing.  Ever since skiing exploded seems there is so much evaluating judging going on in skiing.  You hear the comments in the liftline or on the chair going up-folks skis, boots, clothing are all open for evaluation and then for placing them someplace in a ranking.  For me skiing is about fun and finding challenges to meet.  That is the most important thing to share and where i find myself in the mountains.  So that is why my responses have been a bit jaded.

No kidding regarding the gaps, huh? 

I've skied with former racers that had NorAm points, and compared to them, I couldn't carry their skis from the car to the lifts! My cousin is a former "big mountain film star" guy--and where I would "roll in" off a cornice to a particularly steep and scary line, he would literally back up and air the whole thing.....


Take the famous "corbetts"....where I would side slip in and ski it (and not look like a tool doing it), what I consider a "good skier" would back up and huck the entire thing straight running it. 

 

So yeah, there's HUGE differences in those ability levels... While phil and I ripping around heavenly or northstar at a very high rate of speed looking "rock solid"--and people from the lift would say "whoa, look at those guys"--what I would consider to be a "good skier" would literally fly down, hitting every huge gap (that's not even apparent to me), boosting 360's, back flips, etc. 

 

So yeah, compared to those I consider "good"--honestly I suck.

post #74 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

 

Many years later, shopping for shaped skis.  Tried out a whole bunch.  Had enough experience to like both the heavy solid felling of the Atomic SX11 and the quick as thought and lightness of the Solomon Equipe 10 Pilots.   Ended up with something in between.

 

Did you ever try that Solly Canada-only pseudo-SX ski, the W12 or whatever the name was?

post #75 of 77

I do ski fast with long skis so probably compensating for many things and I know my minds eye is not always the cameras eye.

post #76 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

 

Many years later, shopping for shaped skis.  Tried out a whole bunch.  Had enough experience to like both the heavy solid felling of the Atomic SX11 and the quick as thought and lightness of the Solomon Equipe 10 Pilots.   Ended up with something in between.

 

Did you ever try that Solly Canada-only pseudo-SX ski, the W12 or whatever the name was?


I did try the Solly crossmax, in a few different models and years, but I can't remember if any had the W12 designation.  I found the crossmax skis were OK, but nothing special (the Equipe and Lab skis that got to ski seemed to be a cut above any of the crossmax skis)

post #77 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post

So how would you state your abilities?  Feel free to use any measurement you wish.  

I'm the best skier on the mountain.

Was that a trick question?

Edit: Crap, Jed Peters beat me to it.

More edit:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jed Peters View Post

So yeah, compared to those I consider "good"--honestly I suck.

Who here can't honestly say that?
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